Skip to main content

Full text of "Passionist : bulletin of Holy Cross Province."

See other formats


BULLETIN OP HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 





• 

i 


1 VP J** 














-7 


| 








&k- 


*/ 










<* ■ :& 


fifo. 




t i9 






r^'wai*^ 










lli f M 










( 


# 






'■ i i 




THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished quarterly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each March, 
June, September, and Decem- 
ber. Financed by free-will of- 
ferings of its readers. There 
is no Copyright. The paper is 
a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. Contributions of our 
Missionaries to the Mission- 
ary Forum are invited. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Vox Patris 1 

Saint Gabriel 2 

New Mission Unit 10 

Passionist Diet 15 

Prayer 19 

Ius Particulare 26 

Obituaries 29 

Customs 33 

News 39 

Holy Cross Province 42 

Eastern Province 52 

Varia 65 

Works of Ministry 70 

Who is Who 79 



VOX PATRIS 



PAUL OF THE CROSS, General of 
the Congregation of the Most Holy 

. Passion of Jesus Christ. 

M 



BECAUSE of our sins and ingrati- 
tude, because of the abuse of the 
divine mercy by the greater part 
the world, even more seriously by 
se whom the Lord has invited to 
i^ave sin and to follow along the way 
of His Divine, precepts while the world 
v walks ever more proudly and ungrate- 
fully along the way of perdition, God's 
wrath has been provoked to chastise 
us with the present calamities, the 
threat of almost universal famine and 
want and may God keep us from a 
worse one. Yet it is right, even neces- 
sary that each and everyone submit to 
the divine scourge and take care to 
placate God with penance. This per- 
tains to Religious more than anyone 
else, who should submit to the divine 
scourge with voluntary mortification, 
abstaining from food and from every- 
thing else superfluous, so that their 
aid may be some kind of relief to the 
poor people who are suffering from 
hunger, putting into practice what the 
Holy Doctor St. Leo counsels: Fiat re- 
fectio pauperis abstinentia ieunantis. 

Therefore, seeing that our Retreat 
here at San Angelo cannot maintain 
the Religious with the usual abun- 
dance rightly supplied in the past, we 
have convoked a special Chapter of 
the older priests of this Retreat, in 
order to consult with them de modo 
tenendi to rule this Religious Com- 
munity. With their advice the follow- 
ing regulation has been established 
which may serve as a norm for the 
other Retreats of the Congregation 
as we urge them to try to adopt these 
holy counsels: 




1. It seems expedient that the bread 
be made from whole wheat, but sepa- 
rating it very carefully from the bran, 
and the loaves which were larger be- 
fore should now be made smaller. 

2. Gluttony is the hypocrite of the 
stomach, and he who does not mortify 
his appetite cannot come to mortify 
his other passions nor acquire any 
other virtue; and so we counsel es- 
pecially that the pittance be dimin- 
ished to at least a third less than the 
usual one and we order the same in 
regard to the oil. Thus you can meet 
the needs, while suffering this little 
inconvenience of poverty with greater 
merit. 

"). We also counsel in this common 
calamity, in order to be able to give 
still more alms to the poor, absten- 
ance from any collation in the morn- 
ing. If anyone feels especially weak 
he is advised to take a little more of 
what is customary, but only what is 
BUffcient to strengthen his stomach a 
little, leaving the rest to the pool- for 
the love of God. 

(Cont. on p. 9) 



THE 

VOCATION 

OF 

SAINT 
GABRIEL 

A 

NEW 

ASPECT 

h 

fx. Rag**,, e.V. 




JOHN BEEVER'S Storm of Glory 
has attracted much attention. 
The story of St. Therese's superior, 
Mother Gonzaga, now revealed for 
the first time, has proven almost 
sensational. Some may have sus- 
pected that all was not as it should 
have been in Lisieux's Carmel; but 
few anticipated the state of things 



Decisive moment in the vocation of St. 
Gabriel: the procession at Spoleto. 

under Mother Gonzaga as described 
by Beevers. 

The present study on St. Gabriel 
by no means pretends to be another 
Storm of Glory. But the reading 
of the Processes for St. Gabriel's 
canonization seemed to us to give 
a new picture of his vocation. The 
statements made by members of 



his own family (and who better 
than they knew the story of those 
early years?) did not agree per- 
fectly with the usual picture of his 
vocation. We decided to read fur- 
ther. The result is the present stu- 
dy, which offers a critical analysis 
of the years of St. Gabriel's life be- 
fore his entry to the Novitiate at 
Morrovalle. 

Before we attempt a presenta- 
tion of the vocation of St. Gabriel 
as seen in the Processes, let us first 
briefly recall the usual account giv- 
en by some of the Biographers. 



Young Francis Possenti felt 
called to the religious life. In fact, 
several times sickness indicated to 
him that God was calling. But 
Francis was young, attracted by 
the world, given to pleasant living. 
Some day he would bid farewell, 
but for the present he would con- 
tinue his worldly, frivolous life. 
Even his sister's untimely death in 
1855 did not give him the strength 
of will to follow God's call. 

We read in the Life by Hyacinth 
Hage and Nicholas Ward : 

But alas! from day to day he de- 
ferred the fulfillment of his prom- 
ise, until truth to say, Francis was 
once more under the spell of the 
secular world with all its works 
and pomps. He did not indeed pos- 
itively contradict God's inspira- 
tions; not for a moment did he 
doubt his vocation but he was ever 
putting off to a future day the exe- 
cution of his design. 



But perhaps Father Camillus 
gives us the classic picture of young 
Francis toying with Divine Grace : 

The world he had driven from 
him when death hovered near, he 
now permitted to approach closer 
still. And once more it spread out 
before him its thousand sparkling 
toys and with caressing voice, 
coaxed him to return to the enjoy- 
ment of them. At first, he trifled 
lightly with the temptation and 
then gradually succumbed to its 
seductive power. The glamor of 
the stage, the elegancies of the 
drawing-room, the fascination of 
the opera, the excitement of the 
dance, the romance of the novel, 
again became his delight; and it 
was not long until he was once more 
the gay and frivolous youth he 
had been before. 1 

At last Our Lady appeared to 
him, as her image was being car- 
ried through Spoleto in thanksgiv- 
ing for the end of the plague. Mary 
called and this time Francis heeded. 

This is the picture of the young 
Francis — now urged on by grace, 
now wavering. We are all familiar 
with this aspect of his life. And 
yet, is it entirely accurate? Is this 
the complete picture of St. Gabriel's 
vocation? Is it possible that his 
reluctance to accept God's call may 
be over-painted? Let us see .... 



God planted the seed of a voca- 
tion early in St. Gabriel's life. This 
seed was greatly nurtured by the 
two illnesses he underwent. St. 
Gabriel realized tin- seriousness of 



■ We find that similar statements in -eveial paniphlet-live> of St. Oaluiel. I'or example that 

I'y Lady Herbert <>f Lea, hy Reginald Lummer, C.P. and Osmund Thorpe, C.P. 



this question, for he wrote to the 
learned Jesuit, Father Tedeschini. 
We have the latter's reply, dated 
May, 1855. This letter shows us 
that he was seriously considering 
his vocation, as is clear from the 
extract we quote: 

Remember that this project you 
have in mind (the affair of your 
vocation) is a thing to be treated 
of more by prayers and tears before 
God than by anything else. Place 
all your trust and confidence in 
Mary, and do not waver. 

St. Gabriel took these counsels 
to heart. He even planned to be- 




Dr. Michael Possenti, brother of St, Gab- 
riel. In later life he sent his patients to 
his saintly brother with their ills. 



come a Jesuit. But he was not sure. 
He waited. Deep in his soul there 
was arising a new attraction, 
strange and unexpected in the son 
of the Governor, an attraction for 
penance, for a more austere re- 
ligious group. Another Jesuit, Fa- 
ther Bompiani, has told us of this 
phase of his vocation : 

He felt that he was called to the 
Religious State, but for a while he 
dissimulated. At first he was in- 
clining to our Society, but then 
grew cold, and then he was taken 
by the thought of doing penance, 
and turned his heart and thoughts 
to the Congregation of the Passion- 
is ts. 

How did this attraction to pen- 
ance arise ? It would be interesting 
if we knew, but we can only con- 
jecture. At this time there was 
living on Monteluco near Spoleto a 
holy hermit, called the Hermit of 
Cesi. We know from two letters 
which St. Gabriel wrote as a novice 
that he had consulted this hermit in 
regard to his vocation. Perhaps this 
acquaintance stirred up in young 
Gabriel's heart a desire for a more 
austere order than the Society. 
This is possible. 

Another question arises here: 
how did he become acquainted with 
the Passionists? Even his own 
brother Michael was unable to an- 
swer this question. 

I cannot explain how he came to 
choose the Passionists ; all the more 
so since there were no Passionists 
in Spoleto, and as far as I know it 
seems to me that he had no con- 
tacts with them. 



But what is surprising is that two 
other young men left Spoleto at 
this very same time for the Pas- 
sionist Novitiate at Morrovalle. Had 
the Fathers given a mission in or 
near Spoleto? Or had the recent 
beatification of Paul of the Cross 
called the attention of these young 
men to the Congregation? We do 
not know. 



But we must continue with our 
story. St. Gabriel deferred enter- 
ing the Society because of the new 
attraction for penance and for the 
Congregation of the Passion. And 
while he was evolving these ideas 
in his mind, his sister Teresa died 
of the cholera. Her death had a 
profound influence upon him. Let 
us hear Fr. Bompiani's account: 

In the meantime the cholera came 
to Spoleto in 1855. The young 
Possenti loved his sister very much, 
and felt it deeply when she was 
stricken and died. This death 
wounded him to the quick, and his 
thoughts and urgings for his holy 
vocation were greatly enlivened. He 
gave himself more to prayer and 
interior recollection, although his 
external conduct did not vary much. 

His brother Henry also noted the 
change in Francis : 

I remember that his resolution to 
leave the world and become a re- 
ligious received a great impulse by 
the death of his older sister which 
occurred on June 7, 1855, when he 
was seventeen. 

There was also another who not- 
ed the effect of Teresa's death on 
Gabriel — his father. One day he 
asked Francis what was on his 



mind, and to his great amazement 
and sorrow he learnt that Francis 
wanted to enter religion. 

Now Signor Possenti was a good 
man, a faithful Catholic; but at his 
age, he felt that he had done his 
share for God. His oldest boy, 
Aloysius, was a Dominican. Henry 
was studying for the priesthood. 
Michael was planning on Medicine. 
Teresa was dead in the bloom of 
young womanhood. Surely God 
would permit Francis to remain 
with him — to be his comfort and 
joy in his ola age. Besides, Signor 
Possenti was sure that Francis was 
not cut out for the religious life. 
He had none of the characteristics 
of the monk or friar. This thought 
of his could be only a passing whim. 
The elder Possenti felt it his duty 
as a father to drive this futile idea 
from his son's mind. 

Thereupon Signor Possenti de- 
termined upon a course of action 




Santo Possrnti, St. GftDllel'l fathrr. long 

in opposition to his son's vocation. 



which we would call imprudent, but 
which many other fathers have fol- 
lowed in similar circumstances. He 
decided to make Francis feel the 
attractions and pleasures of social 
life. He even sought to interest 
him in the young daughter of a re- 
spectable family. He insisted on 
his going to the theater. He took 
him to social gatherings. This was 
to be the "year of trial." 

All this seems clear from the 
Processes. For example, Father 
Norbert briefly relates: 

During his last year in the world, 
favored by his father, he gave him- 
self to diversions, but he soon tired 
of them. 

More to the point are the testimon- 
ies of his two brothers. Michael 
is brief, but decisive: 

In fact, his father suspected that 
he wished to leave the family for 
the religious life. He deliberately 
took him more frequently to the 
theater and other respectable ga- 
therings. 

Henry gives us the fullest account, 
which admits of little doubt : 

My brother Gabriel began to go 
to entertainments more than ever, 
but his father always accompanied 
him, for when he learned that he 
wished to become a religious, he 
wanted his son first to know the 
life of the world as a proof or not 
of his tenacity of purpose in this 
matter ... In 1855 he seemed to 
love parties even more, but it was 
his father who asked him to go . . . 
and this sort of thing went on until 
the eve of his departure; at that 



time, he explained to his father and 
said to him that the year granted 
to him as a trial was over ; he was 
of the same opinion, and he wanted 
to withdraw from the world, and 
he asked his permission and holy 
blessing. 2 



What was St. Gabriel's reaction 
to this plan of his father? We have 
already quoted Fr. Bompiani as 
saying: "He gave himself more to 
prayer and interior recollection, al- 
though his external conduct did not 
vary much," Henry implies that 
he spent an hour in his room each 
day, according to the earlier counsel 
of Father Tedeschini. Elsewhere 
Henry tells us that he found a 
leathern belt with points of twisted 
steel in Francis' room, which on 
one occasion Henry hid for him. 
He was certain Francis wore this 
instrument of penance. Of Francis' 
theater-going he gives us the fol- 
lowing interesting account: 

On going to the theater in the 
evening, he asked leave of his fa- 
ther to make a visit, and instead he 
went out of the theater to go under 
the portico of the Cathedral to pray 
to Mary, if the doors of the Church 
were closed. Then he would return 
to the theater, to return home with 
his father. 

Thus the year went by: the fa- 
ther thinking to thwart the voca- 
tion of his young son; Francis 
striving to keep its flame alive 
amid the attractions of social life. 
His chief fault during this "year 



2 In the Italian biographies of Father Germano and Bishop Battistelli we find reference to 
the father's opposition. Bishop Battistelli's work is the best life of St. Gabriel that we have 



of trial" seems to lie, not in his 
refusal to grace, but in over affec- 
tion for his father. He did not 
want to hurt him. It was his weak- 
ness. His brother Michael remarks 
on this : 

I know that he had to overcome 
many difficulties to carry out his 
proposal. Some of the difficulties 
were interior: these came from the 
great affection he had for his own, 
separation from them would be 
most painful ; others were external, 
as the opposition from his own fa- 
ther. 

While trying to get the courage 
to renew his request to his father, 
he attended the Procession with 
the Image of Our Lady. Mary 
turned to him and spoke. At once 
he received strength of soul. With 
Mary's help he was able to over- 
come all his weaknesses, and with- 
stand the opposition. He went to 
his director, Father Bompiani. This 
good Jesuit tells us of the visit, of 
the Saint's resolution to become a 
Passionist, of his own reaction to 
it: 

I was delighted with his resolu- 
tion, but I wondered. A frail youth, 
brilliant, sociable, one who enjoyed 
somewhat a good time (but accord- 
ing to all the norms of propriety). 
I considered his proposal for a 
while. I saw that it was not caprice 
nor a movement of fantastic fervor, 
nor ignorance of the difficulties 
which that state of life would bring 
to him. I ended by approving his 
plan. I was glad, and left the af- 
fair up to his father, whose permis- 
sion was needed. 

Francis lost no time. At once 



he wrote to the Provincial of the 
Passionists. In the meantime he 
spoke to his father about his plans, 
one evening after the family Rosa- 
ry. Old Signor Possenti was disap- 
pointed. He played for time. It 
even seems that he did not give 
Gabriel the first reply from the 
Provincial. Finally, he had his 
oldest son, Father Aloysius, the 
Dominican, speak to Gabriel. The 
Processes tell us that Aloysius was 
home for a vacation. However, 
since vacations are rare amongst 
religious in Italy, we are tempted 
to suspect that the anxious father 
"arranged" this vacation for his 
older son, in order that he might 
talk to young Francis and dissuade 
him from his foolish idea. But af- 
ter speaking to Francis, Aloysius 
was won over to his side, and ap- 
proved of his younger brother's 
resolution. 

Signor Possenti reluctantly gave 
his permission, but on certain con- 
ditions. 

Aloysius accompanied him to Lo- 
retto, there to have his vocation 
examined by the Vicar General, 
Msgr. Acquacotta, our maternal 
uncle, a letter explaining the matter 
to the prelate. Francis came forth 
victorious from this trial. He 
stayed at Loretto for a day, and I 
understand that he remained all 
day long in the Chapel of our Lady. 
The next day, if my memory is not 
bad, he left for Morrovalle, and 
there he had to face another testing. 
from another maternal uncle. Fa- 
ther John Baptist, Capuchin. Here 
too he came forth victorious over 
all the difficulties set before him. 



This is the testimony of Henry, his 
brother. 

Thus St. Gabriel won out against 
his father. He entered the novitiate 
on September 10, 1856. In less than 
six years he was a Saint of God. 



As we can see from the above 
account St. Gabriel had to fight to 
become a religious. It was no light 
matter. The idea of being a re- 
ligious had been in his heart for 
years, yet it was something that he 
realized only after a hard struggle. 
But this struggle was not without 
its fruits. The trial made St. Gab- 
riel pray harder, made him appre- 
ciate the more his vocation. It deep- 
ened within his heart his love for 
God and Our Lady. Above all, it 
enabled him to reach perfection in 




a short time. Gabriel was no tyro 
at the spiritual life when he entered 
the novitiate. At the very begin- 
ning his prayer was a matter of 
surprise and wonder to his com- 
panions and superiors. His soul 
had been stripped in this trial, 
prepared for the practise of virtue. 
Filled with generosity and humility, 
Gabriel was able to soar aloft to 
the heights of holiness. Under the 
direction of Father Norbert he was 
to become a Saint. 

Before closing we ought to ob- 
serve that St. Gabriel's one weak- 
ness had been his love for his fa- 
ther and family. It was from his 
father that there arose this opposi- 
tion to his vocation. Now each visit 
from relatives meant for St. Gab- 
riel a renewal of this opposition, a 
remembrance of his affection for 
his own. Each visit became as it 
were a new temptation against his 
vocation. No wonder then that he 
tried to avert these visits, especial- 
ly during the year of his novitiate. 



The profession of St. Gabriel. 



In closing we might ask : how did 
the usual account of his dallying 
with grace arise? where did we get 
this view of his vocation? 

We would answer that this "tra- 
ditional" picture is due to two 
things. First, St. Gabriel himself 
in his humility blamed himself for 
his delay in responding to grace, 
while at the same time in his chari- 
ty he covered over his father's op- 
position. He did not wish to put the 



fault upon a father he loved so 
dearly. Secondly, the "traditional" 
picture is drawn chiefly from the 
testimonies of witnesses who did 
not know St. Gabriel during the 
critical years of his life at home. 
Their accounts of the early years 
are chiefly from hear-say, and, we 
believe, should give way before the 
testimonies of those who knew him 
personally during these years. 

Our picture is based upon the 
most reliable witnesses — the mem- 
bers of his own family. They bet- 
ter than anyone else knew the op- 
position their brother had to face. 
We believe that their testimony J is 
to be preferred to that of others 
who knew him only as an outsider 
or in later years. Our picture is, we 
think, the one to be found in the 
official Processes for his beatifica- 
tion and canonization. We conclude 




The inspiring death of the Saint, less than 
six years after he had entered the No- 
vitiate. 



that it is the only one that is com- 
plete and accurate. 




(Cont. from p. 1) 
4. We counsel that our guests take 
less bread and everything else. Pro- 
cure what is necessary from them 
before the common meal, so as not to 
be forced to give them dinners and 
collations etc. 

We exhort and beseech all to gain 
merit with God by putting into prac- 
tice the present regulation, which will 
bring forth on their blessed souls 
heavenly blessing in abundance. 

We the undersigned, since we know 
these holy counsels proposed by Most 
Rev. Fr. Paul of the Cross, General of 



our Congregation are very fruitful 
and profitable subscribe to this in our 
own hand. 

John Mary of St. Ignatius, 1st Con- 
suitor 
Sebastian of the Purification, Rector 
Candidus of the M. Holy Wounds 

John Baptist of St. Vincent Ferrer 
.... 17(54 

General 
9 




7L 
Missionary 

FORUM 

• IDEALS 

• TRADITIONS 

• TECHNIQUES 

• LETTERS 

• EXAMPLES 

• SUGGESTIONS 



A NEW MISSION UNIT 



IT WOULD not be an exaggera- 
tion to say that, for the past 
couple years, the eyes of Holy Cross 
Province have been focused on the 
praiseworthy attempts of Father 
Hilary, C.P., to perfect a new Mis- 
sion Unit. The old mission trunks 
that have served the Province so 
well for many, many years, are in- 
creasingly harder to get. Moreover, 

10 



their size, weight and mechanical 
draw-backs have led to several in- 
teresting attempts, during the past 
few years, at a more simplified 
unit. When Fr. Hilary and his 
mechanical genius went to work to 
try help solve the difficulties, it 
was of interest to the whole pro- 
vince. Here Father Hilary de- 
scribes the steps that led gradually 



FORUM 




Rev. Fr. Hilary, C. P. 

to the completion and perfection 
of his new Mission Unit. 



"The new Mission Trunk, or Unit, 
is the outgrowth of approximately 
three years of sporadic mental and 
industrial application. Its evolu- 
tion presents an interesting story. 
eJThe objective I first proposed to 
myself was to produce a new unit 
that would retain the same dimen- 
sions of the original, as far as the 
cross and the corpus was concerned, 
and at the same time to reduce the 



total size and weight of the trunk 
and contents to a minimum. 

I began with a cardboard case, 
to serve as a model. My first work- 
ing case was of "mild steel," made 
in a factory in Cedar Rapids, Iowa. 
It proved unsatisfactory. It dented 
too easily; moreover, it was too 
large, as far as the ideal was con- 
cerned. I began to construct one 
myself, trying to achieve the small- 
est possible dimensions : a case that 
would be only eight inches high, ten 







The new .'Mission Unit, showing how the 

compact arrangement allows a smaller 

trunk. 



11 



FORUM 




The Mission Unit, with the various parts 
wrapped for shipment. 

inches wide and thirty-six inches 
long. This length was necessary, 
because of the corpus. I began to 
look for a light, yet durable materi- 
al for the trunk. Aluminum was my 
first choice. From the American 
Aluminum Company in St. Louis 
came the first supply of the materi- 
al. However, aluminum was not 
decided upon until all other possi- 
bilities were exhausted, plastic 
sheeting, plywood, and synthetics. 
In order to reduce the length of 
the case so that it would hold the 



Corpus without any excess space, 
I re-designed the cross to three 
equadimensional upright sections, 
still retaining the original height 
of one hundred inches. The two 
wings were designed to fit into the 
uprights. The first cross was of 
Spanish Mahogany, hollowed out 
in the back to reduce the weight. 
However, this weakened the cross 
and allowed for some rather notice- 
able torque. Later, when I consid- 
ered the possibilities of using metal 
for the cross, it became a spendid 
reality. 

The stand for the cross also 
went through an interesting evolu- 
tion. If they were displayed in a 
museum, there would be exhibited 
four distinct stages. 




Various parts of the new Mission Unit laid 
out separately. 



12 



FORUM 



The first complete case I achieved 
and considered sufficiently accept- 
able for Mission work was made of 
aluminum. The Corpus was one of 
our present ones. Though the total 
weight amounted to only 38 pounds, 
I felt that this could be reduced 
somewhat. I began casting about 
for a lighter material. Then came 
the idea of using magnesium ; it 
was scarcer than scarce on the mar- 
ket at that time. Just about that 
time I picked up a magazine on the 
train, and there found an interest- 
ing article on the Dow Chemical 
Company of Midland, Michigan. I 
wrote to the President for some 
magnesium sheeting, and sufficient 
sample material arrived to con- 
struct an entire case. Further cor- 
respondence with the Company 
brought about an introduction to 
their Chicago representative. 
Through him I was introduced to a 
factory owner who specializes in 
magnesium products. The manu- 
facture of the case was assured, 
according to my working model. 
Since magnesium is a third lighter 
than aluminum, and more rigid, it 
proved the ideal material for the 
trunk, or case. 

Later I learned that a rectangu- 
lar tubing could be processed or 
extruded from magnesium alloy, 
and the idea of the cross manu- 
factured from magnesium became a 
reality. All I needed was a "die." 
This was ordered and the first 



material for the cross arrived. Un- 
fortunately, it was about that time, 
too, that the Government "froze" 
magnesium, and since then, it has 
been very difficult to obtain enough 
tubing to have more units made. 

Next, there came the provocative 
idea of a different Corpus, one made 
of a material that would not dent, 
bend, break, crack or chip its paint. 
It would have to be of a material 
lighter than zinc. A relentless 
search began to find such a materi- 
al, and some company that would 
make the Corpus. I traveled miles 
upon miles in street cars and autos 
in different cities, particularly in 




Fr. Hiiarv 



with the new 
■enabled. 



Crucifix as- 



13 



FORUM 



Chicago. I corresponded with plas- 
tic companies all over the country, 
synthetic manufacturers and doll 
and novelty firms everywhere. In 
Des Moines I went to the Firestone 
Rubber Company Laboratories and 
there the Technician made up batch 
after batch of liquid rubber for me. 
It was in Chicago that I finally 
tracked down what I was seeking, 
and found the synthetic plastic rub- 
ber and a statuary company that 
could make the Corpus. The result 
is a beautiful figure that weighs 
only four and one half pounds. 

To resume, even though neces- 
sary corrections will have to be 
made, and the "bugs" eliminated as 
they appear, for the Unit is still on 
trial, the net result, in dimensions 
and statistics, is the following: 



The over-all weight of case and 
Crucifix combined, or as prepared 
for shipment, is 26 pounds. The 
old Units weigh approximately 100 
pounds. 

The Corpus is a fraction over 
35 inches long, made of indestructi- 
ble plastic rubber. 

The Cross is 100 inches long, 5 
inches wide and 7/8 inches in thick- 
ness. 

The Case or Trunk is 36 inches 
long, 10 inches wide and 8 inches 
high, constructed of magnesium, as 
is the cross. 

The objective at present is to ob- 
tain sufficient material to go ahead 
with the production. Then we shall 
be able to fill the numerous requests 
that have already come in for the 
New Mission Trunk." 

—Rev. Fr. Hilary, C. P. 




Blind obedience plus true and perfect detachment from one's own will are 
the fundamental virtues of the spiritual edifice: without them it is built upon 
sand. 

{Letters, III, 439) 



14 



HEALTH 





and the 

PflSSIOniST DIET 

£totAe>i £im<m Maiy, G. P. 

III. NUTRITION AND THE 
PASSIONIST DIET 

THE PURPOSE of this article 
is to examine Passionist diet- 
ary practices and food customs in 
the light of sound nutritional prin- 
ciples. In general, it can be said 
that our present food customs sub- 
stantially conform to the standards 
of good nutrition. But there is 
room for improvement, as shall be 
pointed out both as regards the 
diet served and the eating habits 
of individuals. Sufficient nourish- 
ment, the main concern of our Holy 
Founder in regard to feeding his 
religious, shall serve as the basis 
for this analysis. 

An adequate diet consists of all 
food elements; — protein, carbohy- 
drates, fats, mineral salts, vitamins, 



We 


are happy to 


welcome one 


of our 


Brothers into print. 


Brother 


Simon 


Mary. 


of the 


Province of St. Paul 


of the 


Cross, 


knows 


whereof he 


speaks. 


His 


words 


speak 


for themselves 









water, and bulk — in sufficient quan- 
tity and correct proportions to 
maintain health. Does the Passion- 
ist diet fulfill this end? In order 
to find the answer we shall briefly 
consider each element as it occurs 
in our diet. 

Carbohydrates 

Even though the sources for pro- 
tein, carbohydrates, and fats are 
considered fuel-foods, carbohy- 
drates are the most efficient energy- 
producing foods. All starches and 
sugars compose the carbohydrate 
group. Among the starches are the 
common foodstuffs derived from 
grains, namely, breakfast food, 
noodles, spaghetti, cakes, pastries, 
breadstuff's, and crackers. Rice, 
wheat flour, cornstarch, along with 
food items made from them such as 
puddings, gravies and the like are 
included in the starch group. In a 
lesser degree of starch-richness are 
such foods as dried legumes, corn, 
winter squash, and potatoes. 

Under the heading of sugars are 
found candy, syrups, jellies, honey, 
dried fruits, fruits with sugar ad- 
ded, all puddings, ice cream, and 
sweetened deserts. 

Everyone recognizes these foods 
as familiar items in the monastery 

15 



fare. It need only be mentioned 
that there is hardly any likelihood 
of a shortage of carbohydrate in 
our normal diet. In fact carbohy- 
drate foods are so prevalent, even 
among the very poor classes, that 
there rarely arises a deficiency of 
this element in the diet. 

If any carbohydrate problem ex- 
ists amongst us it is more certain 
to be on the side of excess rather 
than deficit. It can easily happen 
that some may think they need 
more energy food than is actually 
necessary. They are apt to confuse 
brain "fag" and sedentary fatigue 
with a positive energy expenditure. 
Ordinarily these states will vanish 
in the presence of fresh air or a 
few minutes given to relaxing the 
muscles. There is a prevalent mis- 
conception among sedentary work- 
ers that "mental" work uses up 
more energy than "muscular" ac- 
tivity. But this is not scientifically 
true. Normally our energy is used 
up in proportion to the amount of 
our muscular exertion. 

When the amount of energy sup- 
plied to the body is in excess of the 
bodily exertion there is the inevit- 
able result — fat. If a person's eat- 
ing habits are leading him along the 
high-road of weight superfluity, 
that individual is mistaking mere 
desire for appetite. Many times 
this is the explanation when one 
feels that he must eat something 
between meals. If there is one 
characteristic commonly associated 
with many pathological states it is 



overweight. How often we have 
heard, — -"I must take off some 
weight." Unfortunately some have 
found it difficult to follow this ad- 
vice and have suffered serious con- 
sequences. It would not be too far- 
fetched to list among famous last 
words — "I know I shouldn't eat this 
—but." 

Many of the, mistakes people 
make regarding carbohydrates is 
due to a lack of proper understand- 
ing of the relative energy value of 
the specific foods. It is not uncom- 
mon to hear someone say, "I am try- 
ing to take off weight, so I quit eat- 
ing bread and potatoes." Poor 
bread and potatoes ! — the much ma- 
ligned foodstuffs. And yet the same 
persons will be seen eating heartily 
of crackers, or cookies, or prepared 
deserts, not to mention a candy bar. 

It should be helpful to some to 
see the relative caloric values, of 
these foods as compared with bread 
and potatoes, the latter incidentally 
being one of nature's best natural 
carbohydrates. (See chart) A na- 
tural carbohydrate food contains 
other important nutrients along 
with the energy-element carbohy- 
drate itself. He is a wise person 
who chooses most of the carbohy- 
drates he needs from natural foods 
rather than relying too much on 
foods made from the highly refined 
carbohydrate, cane-sugar. 

Fats 

There are times in history when 
fats assume a major problem in the 



16 



diet of a people. We of this genera- 
tion have twice witnessed such an 
occurence in the shape of two world 
wars. We in the United States did 
not suffer at all as compared with 
the peoples of war-torn countries. 
Our's was only an inconvenience. All 
our deprivation amounted to was the 
lack of sensory satisfaction asso- 
ciated with that precious fat known 
as butter. We still had oleomar- 
garine which, nutritionally, is just 
as potent as butter when it is for- 
tified with vitamin A. All present- 
day margarine has this enrichment. 

During these times we also had 
meat fats, oils, and foodstuffs rich 
in fat content such as nuts, eggs 
yolks and many other items. So in 
this country we never suffered, nu- 
tritionally, from a lack of fats in 
our diet. Likewise, it can be said 
that there is very little danger of 
the Passionist diet being found de- 
ficient in this concentrated fuel- 
food. One has only to reflect on the 
prevalence in our diet of such foods 
as butter, olive oil, meat fats; and 
in a lesser degree, milk, cheese, 
eggs, nuts, ice cream, and fried 
foods in order to immediately con- 
clude that there is no nutritional 
problem here. 

What was said regarding carbo- 
hydrates can be just as well ap- 
plied to fats. The danger is too 
much instead of not enough. It is 
easy to see why this is so when it 
is understood that fats are a con- 
centrated fuel-food. Weight for 
weight, fat has two and a quarter 



times more caloric value than either 
carbohydrates or proteins. How- 
ever, it is not considered the best 
energy food. Too much fat in the 
diet overtaxes the digestive system. 
A little goes a long way even 
though some is necessary in order 
to give a staying-quality to the food 
we eat by preventing the food 
from leaving the stomach too soon. 
Most corrective diets are character- 
ized by the curtailment of nearly 
all kinds of fats, particularly when 
the disorder is connected in any 
way with the digestive system. 
Some disadvantages of excessive 
fats in the diet are: 1. They lead 
to overweight, and may be a con- 
tributary cause of indigestion and 
skin trouble. 2. They are lacking 
in mineral salts, fiber, and most 
vitamins. 3. They slow down emp- 
tying of the stomach and the diges- 
tion of other foods. 4. In fried 
foods there is the danger of sub- 
stances irritating to the digestive 
tract. Fried foods can be tolerated 
in moderate amounts only. 5. Foods 
coated or permeated with fat may 
escape digestion and putrefy or 
ferment in the intestine. 

Protein 

The chief material needed to 
build muscle tissue is protein. The 
adult needs some protein in his food 
in order to provide for that replace- 
ment necessitated by the wear and 
tear of life processes on his tissues. 

Most foodstuffs, with the excep- 
tion of sweets, contain protein, but 



17 



the outstanding protein foods are 
meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, 
and milk; and to a lesser extent 
legumes and nuts. One or more of 
these protein-rich foods appear in 
nearly everyone of our meals. But 
let us see if our meals provide 
enough of this important nutrient. 

Nutritional scientists assure us 
that 75 grams of protein per day is 
a liberal allowance for a male adult 
of normal weight. Normal weight 
is stressed because it is the size of 
a person that determines the pro- 
tein need, and not the amount of 
work that is done. These authori- 
ties point out that the following 
items will afford about 50 grams 
of protein to a diet; one serving of 
meat, one egg, and two glasses of 
milk. The remaining 25 grams 
needed will easily be furnished by 
the other foodstuffs in the daily 
diet. 

It is certain that our general 
dietary practices assure us of more 
than a sufficient supply of protein. 
Of course if one considers meat as 
the only worth-while protein food, 
that person will question this state- 
ment. There is an admitted differ- 
ence in the appearance of protein- 
bearing foods, but there is no no- 
ticeable difference in the quality 
and effectiveness of the protein it- 
self. 

This leads us to a point the ex- 
planation of which should serve to 
allay the unjustified fears of cer- 
tain Passionists. And that is the 
absence of meat during Lent and 



Advent. According to chemical sci- 
entists, we can be certain that 
whether the body derives its pro- 
tein from meat or whether it gets 
it from fish, eggs, or cheese mat- 
ters little. It is all protein. And 
they tell us that one is as good as 
another for the replacement of 
* tissue structure. We grant there 
is a considerable difference in the 
taste of the foodstuffs mentioned. 
We don't have to be reminded of 
that. That distinctive flavor for 
which meat is noted is due to the 
extractives it contains. However, 
this flavor does not enhance the 
quality of the protein. This is borne 
out by the fact that meat broths 
which are known for their stimulat- 
ing effects upon the digestive pro- 
cesses because of the presence of 
these extractives has little relative 
food value. 

Except in particular circumstanc- 
es there need be no protein prob- 
lem during either Lent or Advent, 
if individuals partake even moder- 
ately of fish, eggs, cheese, milk, 
and legumes. That woe-begone-feel- 
ing is either due to the fast or is 
psychological; it is not due to the 
absence of meat. All we lose is the 
sense pleasure found in the taste of 
meat. When one realizes this fact 
it sheds a clearer light on the mor- 
tification aspect of our abstinence. 
A concrete proof of what has been 
said is to be found in that commu- 
nity of men who eat no meat at any 
time and very little of other pro- 
( Continued on page 71) 



18 



An Outline for I'assionists 

D 




v_y 



1 



These articles will endeavor to outline the 
'ways of mental prayer', or the various steps 
of progress in prayer leading to union with 
God. 

It is true that in recent years there have 
appeared excellent books on the subject, as 
well as new editions of the old masters. How- 
ever the apology for these articles is twofold : 
first, that they are written for Passionists 
alone and hence are a brief practical treat- 
ment pointed to our way of life ; secondly, 
wherever possible, they are drawn from our 
Holy Founder's teaching. 



PRAYER OF FAITH 

IN THE article ON AFFECTIVE 
PRAYER it was pointed out that 
this form of prayer tends to become 
very simple. The soul comes to 
express by very brief acts or as- 
pirations its complete attitude to- 
wards God. It does not have need 
for many words. 

It was then pointed out that one 
of two things may intermittently 
happen. Either the soul may be 
drawn to frequent long pauses of 
silence and recollection ; or the soul 
may be left in great dryness, aridi- 
ty and even an apparent inability to 
pray at all. On the first point, our 
Holy Founder's advice is quite 
clear and easy to follow : simply 
follow the attraction of grace; re- 
main in that loving attention to 
God. 

An example of the second form 
of prayer is contained in a letter 
to the Marchioness del Pozzo, Jan. 
3, 1729. Although lengthy, we in- 
clude it almost in full because it 




By Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P. 



contains all the elements of this 
prayer and because it seems so 
clear that one can hardly be mis- 
taken in understanding it. 

"I tell you that it is a most ex- 
cellent and holy thing to think of 
the Passion of our Lord, to make 
prayer on it, and this is the way to 
attain to holy union with God. But 
you should realize that the soul 
cannot always do as in the begin- 
ning, and that you must second the 
impulses of the Holy Spirit and let 
yourself be guided as His Divine 
Majesty wills. You tell me that 
you don't know how to make prayer 
except on the life, passion and death 
of our Saviour. Continue this with 
the benediction of the Lord as in 
this holy school true wisdom is 
learned. That is where the saints 
learned. 

"As long, — note this carefully — 
as you can meditate as at first, do 
so, for this is what you should do. 
But for charity's sake, answer one 
little thing: are there not times, 
and possibly isn't it most of the 
time that you are in a state that 
you seem unable to do anything, 
you can't meditate, your mind is in 
great obscurity, filled with distrac- 



1<) 



tion and such disgust of spiritual 
things that you feel like running 
away; that you are full of weari- 
ness and tedium? I believe I have 
observed correctly; so when this 
happens, here is the way for you to 
act. 

"Do thus. For example : this 
morning the dolorous circumcision 
of Jesus or some other mystery ac- 
cording to the arrangements, or 
your devotion, has been selected 
for your meditation; and lo, you 
experience such dissipation of spi- 
rit that you don't know how to go 
about meditating: it is a sign that 
God wants you to pray more in 
faith, (I speak according to His 
spirit), and to walk with greater 
purity of intention, stripped of 
every exercise agreeable to itself, 
in which our own senses have the 
greater part, and to remain wholly 
attached to the divine breasts of 
God's sacred charity, sucking the 
milk of holy love. I pray that God 
will make you understand what He 
inspired me to write : however, if 
you do not understand it so clearly 
now, I hope in His Divine Majesty 
that you will understand it better 
within a short time. 

"Now then, let us get back to the 
point. When therefore you find 
yourself in the aforesaid way, re- 
main sweetly in the presence of 
God; reanimate your faith without 
forcing the head or chest, firmly 
believing that your dear God is 
wholly within you, and outside of 
you, in your heart, in your soul, in 



your body and in every place. The 
heavens and the earth are full of 
His divine Majesty. Oh, what a 
pleasing thing is this! Let us say 
with St. Augustine: Oh my God, 
I went searching for Thee outside 
of myself and I had Thee in myself, 
within myself! Yes, abyssed in the 
immense sea of His love, deeply rec- 
ollected, with great faith and rev- 
erence, speak to your God in spirit 
about the subject you had chosen 
for meditation, for example: Oh, 
my sweet God, what sufferings in 
your most innocent and tenderest 
years! Why does my heart remain 
so insensible to it? etc. Or as God 
inspires you. These colloquies 
should be made very sweetly, with- 
out spiritual strain, in pure faith, 
without seeking images. If during 
this time you feel your heart filled 
with peace, compassion or other 
sentiments, according as God wills, 
pause there, all recollected in God, 
as a bee upon a flower and suck 
the honey of holy love in devout si- 
lence. If afterwards you feel drawn 
to continue making other acts of 
love in the form of a colloquy, do 
so, but pray in peace : and so in the 
other mysteries. 

"At times it will happen that even 
when you do as I have said above, 
you will still remain in great ob- 
scurity, aridity, etc., and will be 
powerless to do anything; indeed 
it will seem to you that you remain 
there wasting your time, — which 
is not true. No matter, remain thus, 
in the presence of God like a poor 



20 



person asking an alms of its great 
Father. But you will say: to me 
it seems that I do not pray, but ra- 
ther waste time. Quite the con- 
trary, indeed this is a most pure 
and disinterested prayer, because 
stripped of self-interest. I pray you 
to read and reread this letter." 

The prayer of faith is one of 
simple loving attention to the Pres- 
ence of God in the soul, without 
sensible devotion and without the 
use of the imagination or discursive 
reasoning. 

Before analyzing this prayer fur- 
ther it might be well to first give 
several other examples of it. 

The following letter is written to 
Sister Angela, a Carmelite. (L. Ill, 
607): 

'I received your letter yesterday. 
In it I read to my joy of the trials 
which your soul is undergoing. I 
rejoice at this in the Lord, for this 
is a clear sign that the Blessed God 
wants to give you great graces and 
to bestow upon you the gift of His 
holy love. 

"But be attentive to what I tell 
you. When you cannot apply to 
meditation or to reading books, but 
your mind wanders and your head 
aches, this a sign that God wants 
you to rest as a baby on the most 
holy bosom of His charity. There- 
fore act as follows: Humble your- 
self in the Presence of God, con- 
fessing yourself to be most un- 
worthy of remaining in His pres- 
ence; invoke the help of the Blessed 
Virgin Mary, of the angels and 



saints, and then enter within your- 
self in the obscurity of faith, with- 
out fatiguing your head with imag- 
inations, and there stay with your 
mind in loving attentiveness to the 
Presence of God within you, in the 
sacred silence of faith and of love, 
and believe that for you this is a 
grand prayer, of great merit, and 
do not believe that you are wasting 
time or are idle, for in this prayer 
of faith the soul journeys far in 
the love of God without knowing it. 
Yes, from time to time awaken 
your spirit by reviving your faith 
in the presence of God and with 
your spirit make some loving dart, 
as for example : "Oh Father ! Oh 
great Father! Oh charity! Oh love 
. . . ! But one at at time and with- 
out forcing yourself, peacefully; 
and when you feel that with this af- 
fection your soul becomes recol- 
lected in God, then continue your 
prayer in pure faith, in the silence 
of faith and love; and no matter 
what aridity, desolation, anguish or 
temptation there may be, do not 
omit or leave prayer, but be very 
faithful. Take courage, therefore, 
for God loves you and wants to 
make you a saint and that is why 
He tries you in this manner, for 
these trials are trials of faith, such 
as God sends to holy souls." 

To Teresa Palozzi, who later be- 
came the second Passionist nun, he 
wrote : 

"I hear that you cannot meditate 
and that you find yourself very dry, 
not being able to apply to medita- 



LM 



tion. Do as follows. Always bring 
to prayer the points for meditation, 
and when your soul is dry, wearied 
and feels disgust and pain in what 
used to occasion sentiments of de- 
votion, but your soul would enjoy 
remaining in a peaceful repose of 
faith and love in God, then remain 
thus. Remain within yourself in 
pure faith, without images, with a 
sweet, peaceful attentiveness upon 
God Whom you hold entirely within 
yourself. You are more in God 
than in yourself. Remain therefore, 
with this loving attentiveness upon 
God and repose on the Divine Bos- 
om of this great Father in the si- 
lence of faith and holy love. When 
your mind wanders and distractions 
come, softly revive your faith with 
some loving glance at God and with 
some sweet colloquy upon the Sa- 
cred Passion of Jesus Christ and 
then continue your repose in God 
with faith and love. Humble your- 
self exceedingly in the Divine Pres- 
ence; know your own nothingness, 
your capacity, as much as is in you, 
of doing every evil if God did not 
hold you in His divine arms. In 
this way hide yourself yet more in 
the Supreme Good. In this way 
which I am telling you, you will 
advance to a continual remembrance 
of the presence of God which is 
rich in every good, and moreover 
you will acquire the interior soli- 
tude and true recollection of heart. 
"Read and reread very atten- 
tively this letter, begging the Holy 
Spirit to give you light to under- 



stand it and to practice what I tell 
you." (Ill, 361) 

Analyzing these three letters, — 
and many others treating of this 
form of prayer, — we see that this 
prayer of faith consists essentially 
in a simple, loving attention of the 
soul to God. This attention to God 
is based, not on any feeling of 
God's presence; nor on any picture 
of His presence formed by the im- 
agination ; nor on any involved rea- 
soning on God's presence: it rests 
simply upon faith. We have Christ's 
word for it that He together with 
the Father and Holy Spirit dwell in 
our souls. The soul therefore does 
not try to feel God's presence; nor 
form any imagination of it; nor 
stop to reason on how He is pres- 
ent. It is taken up with the fact 
alone. It is content with faith. 

This attention is a loving atten- 
tion, based upon all the love of the 
soul for God. It is the whole soul 
seeking God. 

It is a prayer wherein the soul 
does not speak a great deal. It 
ordinarily makes only such acts 
as are needed to keep the soul in 
a loving attention to God ; although 
at times it will be drawn to speak 
to God about His passion and at 
times, to pray for the needs of 
others, the church, the world, etc. 

One of the great difficulties about 
this form of prayer is its begin- 
ning. Ordinarily the soul needs to 
be directed to practice it. Lost as 
it is in aridity, dryness and dis- 
traction it is not likely to turn to 



22 



this form of prayer of its own ac- 
cord. That would seem to be even 
less of a prayer than the futile ef- 
forts it had been putting forward. 
It may be only after some time 
that the soul will 'find itself in 
this form of prayer; before it 
comes to find God and to be satis- 
fied with Him in faith alone. 

But this very aridity and inabili- 
ty to pray as hitherto is one of the 
signs that the soul should now be- 
gin to pray in this new way. The 
soul may be eager for the time of 
prayer, but when the time has come 
the mind seems to have lost its 
power of action. There are no good 
thought, no good affections; com- 
plete sterility and aridity reign 
and ordinary efforts cannot dispel 
them. The imagination may run 
riot, — though usually with no par- 
ticular attractions. The sense may 
even clamor for earthly things. But 
in some obscure way the will wants 
God, and wants Him strongly. 

This last point is most important. 
Indeed all the other elements of 
this state of soul may be simply 
signs of lukewarmness. They are 
the inevitable results of failure to 
observe those four great prepara- 
tions of soul suggested by our Holy 
Founder for success in prayer: 
namely the practice of recollection 
during the day, detachment from 
the world, the practice of mortifica- 
tion and an exact observance of our 
Holy Rule. (Vide Regulations, No. 
27.) Or again these other elements 
might be due simply to physical or 



mental weariness. 

But if this desire for God is 
present; if the soul desires to be 
there at prayer in order to give it- 
self up to a loving attention to God ; 
and if the soul does not deliberately 
desire anything else, then all is well, 
very well with the soul! This is 
a sign of God's action in the soul. 

Our Holy Founder writes to a 
certain priest : "Replying to your 
letter I want to say that your 
prayer is better than heretofore. 
The principle sign indicating that 
it is time to leave off discursing in- 
teriorly is that your soul wishes to 
be left alone in the loving bosom of 
our Lord in a loving attention with 
a sweet gaze of faith in a sacred si- 
lence of love. Go on in this way 
then, for I recognize all the best 
signs according to the masters of 
the spiritual life." (II, 818) 

In the second of the above letters, 
and in many others, our Holy Foun- 
der mentions this as being one of 
the signs that a soul should change 
its manner of prayer. He also fre- 
quently states that in these direc- 
tions he is simply following the 
teachings of the saints and masters 
of the spiritual life. (e.g. 55; I, 
382; etc.) (cfr. St. John of Cross, 
Dark Night, Bk. I, c. 9; Garrigou- 
Lagrange, Christian Perf. & Con- 
templation, c. vi, art 3). 

God has changed His manner of 
presenting Himself to the soul. He 
now desires the soul to receive and 
to love Him by faith alone. He no 
longer makes His appeal through 



23 



the senses and the imagination. 

As long as we seem to 'feel' or 
experience God's presence or His 
goodness, unless we are very wise 
in the ways of the saints, we are 
inclined to rest in or rely upon 
these feelings and to treat with 
God as though He were merely 
that which we feel or experience 
Him to be, whereas feelings give us 
a very imperfect view of God. Our 
moments of highest sensible de- 
votion and even possible moments 
of special grace when the soul is 
aware of the presence of God and 
of His goodness in some special 
way, — even these give us a very 
inadequate idea of God. Faith goes 
much further and says, "God is not 
merely as good as I feel Him to be ; 
or as good as I have ever felt or 
experienced Him to be; He is in- 
finitely good. All feeling and all 
experience of the goodness of God 
give me, at best, but a tiny inkling 
of the goodness of God. The truth 
is He is good without any limit 
whatsoever. And He is always so, 
— whether I feel it or not." We 
must learn to deal with God as 
THE INFINITE ONE and to love 
Him with a love based on this ha- 
bitual concept of Him, and that, 
not only in times of sensible devo- 
tion, but always. Only if one is de- 
prived of sensible devotion for a 
long time will the soul come to deal 
with God in this way. 

This trial should not surprise us, 
but would seem to be almost the 
inevitable experience of a soul pass- 



ing from discursive prayer to one 
of pure faith. Being composed of 
body and soul as we are, and hav- 
ing become accustomed to dealing 
with God through our imagination 
and emotions, the soul is not likely 
to find great satisfaction in prayer 
wherein the emotions have no part, 
wherein the soul adheres to God 
directly through the intellect and 
will alone. However, despite its 
lack of sensible satisfaction in such 
a prayer the soul will soon come to 
recognize this as an advance and 
not a retrogression in prayer and 
union with God. 

The description and advice of St. 
John of the Cross for this form of 
prayer is the same as that of our 
Holy Founder, (cfr. Dark Night, 
Bk. I, c 10) St. John of the Cross 
develops at great length the bene- 
fits the soul derives from this 
prayer, (ibid c. 12 & 13). Briefly 
they are: humility, through the 
knowledge of one's misery; the 
practice of seeking God's pleasure 
and not the soul's in prayer and in 
all its doings ; greater fidelity in the 
moral virtues; and finally, the ha- 
bitual remembrance of the presence 
of God. This remembrance may 
be very often without sensible de- 
votion; but because of this fact it 
is an exercise of a much purer faith 
and more perfect love. Our Holy 
Founder mentions now one, now an- 
other of the fruits of this prayer. 

Needless to say, this is not the 
prayer of a novice. Ordinarily it 
should not be as uncommon as is 



24 



sometimes thought. In one of his 
letters our Holy Founder seemed 
to infer that most of his religious 
were then practicing this form of 
prayer. 

A careful reading of the above 



letters of St. Paul will afford help 
in practicing this prayer of faith. 
Further points of practical advice 
for this form of prayer, drawn 
from the letters of our Holy Foun- 
der, will be given in another article. 




DISTRESS SIGNAL 

The hospital ship was bound for the forward area for another load of wound- 
ed soldiers. Her wireless operator heard — so faintly— the call of distress. Lo- 
cation not given. Ships at sea during war must keep radio silence unless in 
danger, Hospital Ship excepted. With so little on the air the distress calls 
came in again and again all through the day and into the night. But from 
where? 

It was late when the wireless operator informed the Captain that the call 
was perhaps now at its full volume. It might be near — very near. 

The Captain ordered reduced speed and the search lights turned on. For- 
ward and aft; starboard and port side the sailors played the lights on the 
waters — so dark, you would call them black. Up and down; back and forth; 
near and far; right and left the lights were moved. Then the light on the port 
side (left) picked up something. The Hospital Ship started to circle towards 
the object. Now they could see more clearly. It was a raft. The color showed 
they were downed flyers — Americans — our men — our boys — and were still 
alive. Doctors, nurses and sailors lined the rails of all the decks on portside. 
Ladders were being lowered. Closer and closer the ship circled up to the raft. 
Now they were alongside. 

The time was eleven P.M., Dec 24th, 1944, somewhere in the Pacific. 

The first words was spoken by one of the men in the raft. As he looked up 
to all who were looking down ; he cried out 

"Merry Christmas." 

(Note the hospital ship might have been named Mercy, or Comfort, or Bene- 
volent but it wasn't. It was called the Hope. Oh yes. And the Chaplain's name 
was Mahedy. (Fr. Brian Mahedy, C.P.) And this is the way he told the tale to 
me.) 



25 



Our Superior; 



lus Particulate C.P. 




THE VICAR 



DESIGNATION 



APPOINTMENT 



220. We give the 
designation of Vi- 
car or Vice-Rector 2 to that religious 
who assists the Rector in govern- 
ing the Community and takes his 
place. 1 Insofar as he fulfills the 
duties of an administrator, he can 
be called an econome. 3 

221. In the 1741 
Rule there was no 

mention of the election of the Vicar. 
However in the latin Rule of 1746, 
mention is twice made of his elec- 
tion. The first time is a reference 
to the custom then in force in the 
Congregation whereby the General 
(Provinces were not yet existent), 
upon the completing of the elections 
in Chapter, immediately appointed 
a Vicar for each Rector: "In the 
same Chapters all the Rectors shall 
be elected in the same manner, and 
the General shall immediately give 
each a Vicar." 

The second mention considers the 
case of a division of the Congrega- 
tion into several Provinces and 
prescribes as follows: "The elec- 
tion of the Provincial, his Consul- 
tors, the Rectors and Vicars of each 



Province will pertain to the Pro- 
vincial Chapter." However, in 1769, 
after the founding of two canonical 
Provinces, the word Vicar was re- 
moved from the above text. Hence, 
there was never an election of Vic- 
ars by Chapter. 

Finally in 1775 the text of the 
Rule was changed to its present 
reading, namely: 1) in speaking of 
General Chapters, there is no long- 
er any mention of the election of 
Rectors or of the appointment of 
Vicars by the Provincial; 2) later, 
when it treats of the Provincial 
Chapter, the following words were 
added: "to the same General or 
Provincial shall pertain the duty 
of appointing a Vicar for each 
Rector." 4 

In regard to the vote of the Con- 
suitors for the election of the Vicar, 
see number 202. 

222. The office 
of Vicar is at the 
pleasure of the 
Provincial. Ordinarily, Vicars re- 
main in office until the next Chap- 
ter, and they can be confirmed. 
Father Bernard adds: This con- 



DU RAT I ON OF 
OFFICE 



26 



firmation is granted one time only ; 
whence after six consecutive years, 
unless another has been appointed, 
the religious remains in office as 
pro-vicar for the interval."' I might 
venture to say that this designa- 
tion is not found in the documents 
of the Congregation, nor is there 
sufficient evidence in law that the 
Vicar can be confirmed in office only 
once. Thus, is the latin text of the 
Customs, as emended, we read sim- 
ply: "Unless revoked, this office 
lasts until the Chapter, that is, un- 
til the election of a new Rector, 
and then it needs confirmation." 6 



PRECEDENCE 



223. In the 1746 



Rule the Vicar was 
given precedence over the Master 
of Novices : "First after the Rec- 
tor comes the Vicar. The Master 
shall take his place immediately 
after the Vicar." Nevertheless, it 
is apparent that this happened 
through a copyist's error, for the 
Acts of the First Chapter (1747) 
we read : "The Master of Novices 
has precedence over the Vicar, al- 
though the contrary is stated, in- 
advertently." Whence, in the next 
emendation of the Rule, (1769) the 
text was expressly stated thus : 
"The Vicar, unless there be a Mas- 
ter of Novices present, shall hold 
the place next to the Rector." So 
we read today. 7 

224. In the early 

fuCCESSlON days of the Conju- 
gation, if the Rec- 
tor died in office, he was succeeded 
ipso jure by the Vicar. The ar- 



rangement is clearly contained in 
the 1746 Rule and in the Clemen- 
tine text of the Rule in 1769. "If 
the Rector dies before the comple- 
tion of the current term," the Rule 
says, "the Vicar shall succeed, and 
shall possess the same powers. " s 
However, this prescription was sup- 
pressed in the definitive rule of 
1775. 
\ m ^mmmKmm 225. His authority 

W T VICAR Y is mentione(i in £ en " 
eral terms in the 

Rule: 1) When the Rector is pres- 
ent, the Vicar assists him when he 
is in need or help, or prevented 
from acting. 9 Thus, when the Rec- 
tor is present, he can do nothing 
in regard to the government of 
the Community, besides carry out 
the Rector's orders. Hence, it is 
stated in the Regulations: "When 
the Rector is in the Retreat, let 
him not give permissions of any 
kind, nor take upon himself any au- 
thority except as it shall have been 
given him by the Rector or the 
Higher Superiors." 1 " And in the 
Customs : "In regard to the relig- 
ious, seculars and the affairs of the 
community, his authority extends 
only so far as delegated to him by 
the Rector or the Provincial." 11 

Nevertheless, he shall watch over 
the observance of the Rules, as the 
Regulations direct, 1 - so that he 
can make known to the Rector any 
transgressions, if expedient. "On 
occasion," adds Father Bernard, 
"he can give the offender a repre- 
hension and impose light pen- 



27 



ances." 1 * However, recalling the 
disposition of the Regulations, this 
is not permitted unless, and only 
in so far as, he has received the 
necessary authority from the Rec- 
tor; accordingly, these words were 
suppressed in the latin edition of 
the Customs. 

2) When the Rector is absent, 
the Vicar takes his place. 14 How- 
ever, he ought to act in accordance 
with the prescriptions of the Rec- 
tor, and refrain from undertaking 
any important business. 15 

If the Rector's absense is pro- 
longed beyond a week, to the Vicar 
falls the duty of holding the Friday 
Chapter, of seeing that the examen 
is given in the Choir, and of con- 
vening the local Chapter if neces- 
sary. 16 

226. Although 

PARTICULAR fh au thorifv of 

ASSIGNMENTS lhe autnorit y 0l 

the Vicar, as far 

as the government of the Communi- 
ty is concerned, is very limited, as 
is evident from what has been said, 
there are certain particular duties 
which fall to him, even when the 
Rector is present. The more im- 
portant are the following: 

1) He administrates the daily, 
or minute expenses, subject to the 



Rector, as the Rule 17 and the Regu- 
lations 18 prescribe. 

2) He gives counsel in regard to 
extraordinary expenses, or ordinary 
expenses, within the limits pre- 
scribed by the Regulations. 19 

3) He has the ordinary care of 
the daily domestic affairs, especially 
those which regard the garden, the 
kitchen and the servants. 20 

4) He signs the report of admin- 
istration which is sent to the Gen- 
eral or the Provincial. 21 

5) He makes out the list of min- 
isters for sacred functions, with 
due regard to the Rector, unless 
there is a Director of Students in 
the Retreat. 22 

227. Unless there is 

econome" some special reason ' 
the Provincial should 

commit the office of local econome 
to the Vicar; 23 and thus leave the 
Rector free of these details, that 
he may with greater ease and 
diligence watch over those things 
which regard spiritual progress. 24 
In this case, to the Vicar, as eco- 
nome, falls the office, in accord with 
the norms of common law and our 
particular law, of carrying out 
whatever regards the administra- 
tion, as we shall mention later. 25 



l Reg., n. 261. 2 Stat., n. 155. 3 Can. 516; Reg., 261. 4 Reg., n. 261. 5 Bernardo, Con- 
suet., p. 207. 6 Sylloge, n. 372. 7 Reg., n. 261. 8 Regula 1746, cap. XXXII ; Reg. 1769, cap. 
XXXII. 9 Reg., n. 261. 10 Stat., n. 155. ll Sylloge., n. 374. 12 Stat., n. 156. 13 P. Bernardo, 
Consuet., p. 208. 14 Reg., n. 261. 1 5 Stat., n. 255. 16 Stat., n. 157. 17 Reg., n. 157. 
18 Stat., n. 168 ; Cfr. Sylloge, n. 373. 19 Stat., n. 167. 20 Cap. Gen. XIX, sess. 3 ; Sylloge, 
n. 374. 21 Stat., n. 175. 22 Stat., n. 158. 23 Reg., n. 261. 24 Cap. Gen. XIX, sess. 3. 
25 Vide n. 340. 



28 




Followers 
of 
the 
Crucified 



'If we have died with Christ, we believe that we shall also live tvith Christ." (Rom. 6,8) 



MSGR. DAMIANO GIOVANNI GIUSEPPE THEELEN* 



OF THE 11 Bishops the Congre- 
gation has given to the See 
of Nicopolis in Northern Bulgaria, 
Msgr. Damiano Giovanni Guiseppe 
Theelen held the office for the long- 
est time: 31 years. 

Giovanni Giuseppe Theelen was 
born at Beesel, Holland, on April 
14, 1877, the son of Goffredo and M. 
Teresa Godfers. He entered our 
Alumnate at Ere, Belgium, in 1891, 
at the age of fourteen, and the fol- 
lowing year was sent to the Novi- 
tiate at Courtrai, where he was 
professed on October 23, 1893. Up- 
on the completion of philosophy and 
theology at Ere and Courtrai, he 
was sent to Merignac, France, as 
a Lector, and later as Director also. 
When he reached the age of 23, 
he was ordained to the priesthood 
at Bordeaux, September 23, 1899, 



with a dispensation. Upon his re- 
turn to Belgium, around August 
1902, he was made the first Direc- 
tor of Students at Courtrai and 
then Lector and Director of Stu- 
dents at the Prep School until 
1910, whilst from September 1911 
until October 1914 he filled the 
office of Lector and Director of 
Students at Courtrai. Then in the 
Provincial Chapter of July, 1914, 
he was elected First Consultor of 
the Province of St. Gabriel. Later, 
when the Province of Our Lady of 
Holy Hope was formed in Holland, 
he was chosen for the new Province. 

In 1915 the Diocese of Nicopolis 
lost its Bishop, Msgr. Leonard Lui- 
gi di Baumbach, and the 38 years 
old Father Damiano was elected to 
succeed him on May 21. 

He was consecrated Bishop at 



t (Father Damiano delTAddolorata) of the l'lovincc of our Lady of Holy Hope, died at 
Russe (Bulgaria) OH August H. L946, in the t;<Uh year of his lift and the BSrd of his profession. 

29 



Rome, on August 15, over the tomb 
of St. Paul of the Cross, by His 
Eminence Cardinal Gennaro Gra- 
nito Pignatelli di Belmonte, assist- 
ed by Msgr. Peter Paul Camillus 
Moreschini, Passionist Archbishop 
of Camerino, and Enrico Doulcet, 
Titular Archbishop of Dioclea, also 
a Passionist. 

The new Prelate left immediately 
for his Mission, arriving by boat 
at Russe at the beginning of Sep- 
tember, and took possession of his 
See. 

Full of confidence in God — he had 
chosen for the motto on his coat 
of arms: Dominus spes mea — he 
girded himself for the task of gov- 
erning his Missions, and for over 
thirty years he fed the flock en- 
trusted to him. 

His first care was for the forma- 
tion of a native clergy. He spent a 
great deal of money for this pur- 
pose, and he succeeded, to his great 
consolation, in obtaining good Pas- 
sionist priests, who were native 
Bulgarians, whose initial forma- 
tion was had in his seminary. 

Every year, regularly, he ad- 
ministered Confirmation in the va- 
rious parishes in his diocese, and 
on such occasions he would listen 
with great patience and amiable- 
ness to the faithful who came to 
him to tell their troubles. He 
preached to the people, passed long 
hours in the confessional hearing 
the confessions of penitents who, 
at least once in their life, wanted 
to confess their sins to their own 



Bishop. 

Every two years he preached the 
spiritual exercises to his clergy, 
without ever repeating himself. 
The same testimony comes from 
various orders of Sisters and Re- 
ligious to whom he often preached, 
not only in Bulgaria, but also in 
France, Italy and Romania. 

His annual pastoral letters gave 
the diocese a clear exposition of 
Catholic doctrine and morals, al- 
ways suited to the time and place. 

As for what concerned the ma- 
terial side of the Missions, with 
the aid of his numerous friends in 
Holland, and elsewhere, both lay 
and ecclesiastical, he undertook the 
construction of three new churches, 
enlarged two others, and restored 
and redecorated yet another. He 
provided rectories for two parishes, 
and secured financial assistance for 
the construction of a third. He 
built a convent for the Sisters in 
three different parishes. His great- 
est work is his Santa Maria school 
which he built in his episcopal city 
of Russe, and confided to the care 
of the Sisters. 

In 1940 he celebrated the jubilee 
of his episcopal consecration amidst 
the most lively interest of the Holy 
Father — who appointed him an As- 
sistant to the Papal Throne — of the 
Congregation, and of the Bulgarian 
people. 

After thirty years of labor, the 
zealous Pastor felt worn out and 
wasted in health. His doctor ad- 
vised him that he had high blood 



30 



pressure and prescribed a rigorous 
diet and absolute rest. Thereupon 
Msgr. Theelen resigned himself to 
passing a month at the Benedictine 
Sisters at Tsarebrod, scrupulously 
following out the doctor's orders. 
Upon his return to Russe, the doc- 
tor noted a slight amelioration, and 
added somewhat to the diet. In the 
meantime, the hard-working Bishop 
planned to resume his labors and 
had already scheduled, on his Au- 
gust program, two retreats, the 
first of which was to begin the 6th. 

On the morning of that day the 
Sisters at Russe waited in vain for 
the Bishop to come and say Mass, 
as he had done invariably for thir- 
ty years. Brother John hastened to 
the Retreat to see what had hap- 
pened to the Bishop. He knocked 
at the door, but got no response. 
Then, getting a ladder, he climbed 
to the window. To his great dismay 
and horror, he saw the Bishop ly- 
ing on the floor at the side of the 
bed, his face a flaming red, and 
blood still dripping from a wound 
in his right temple, caused by the 
fall against the espalier of the bed. 
A cerebral hemorrhage had brought 
an end to a life of activity. Broth- 
er John understood, then, that the 
Bishop had had a true presenti- 
ment of his imminent death, when, 
the night before, he had said: 
"Brother John, T wish to give you 
my blessing, perhaps for the last 
time." 

The Fathers at the Cathedral 
were notified by telephone, and 



when Father Enrico arrived, Broth- 
er John entered the room through 
the window. As soon as the door 
was opened, Father entered and 
they placed the body on the bed. 
The sorrowful news was then tele- 
phoned to the various parishes in 
the diocese, and on the following 
day the Missionary Fathers began 
to arrive to pay their last respects 
to their Bishop and Father. 

Even in the midst of his pastoral 
cares, Msgr. Theelen maintained 
his love for the practices of a poor 
and retired life among the sons of 
the Passion. For thirty years, 
whenever he was in his see city, 
he spent the night in the Retreat 
of the Holy Family, situated at one 
end of the City of Russe. At an 
early hour in the morning, he went 
to an old convent to say Mass for 
the Sisters, and around 8 o'clock 
betook himself to the Cathedral, 
situated at the opposite end of the 
city, and there spent the day in the 
episcopal residence, occupied in the 
duties of a Bishop. In the after- 
noon, he made the return trip, 
stopping off at the Sisters for an 
evening service, and then spending 
the night at the Retreat. This walk 
of about a half-hour every morn- 
ing and evening the humble Bishop 
made in summer and winter, in 
heat and cold, in rain or snow. He 
never used any means of transpor- 
tation. 

In 1941 he wrote in his own 
hand his will, thus; "As a religious 



31 



with vows I do not wish to dispose 
of anything: everything I possess 
I leave to the diocese of Nicopolis." 



The funeral took place on August 
8. The burial was in the Cathedral 
at Russe. 



FR. JEROME OF ST. MICHAEL THE ARCHANGEL* 



FATHER JEROME was born 
November 12, 1870, at Palom- 
bara Sabina (Rome), the son of 
Luigi and Angela De Angelis. He 
entered the Congregation as a 
youth, and pronounced his vows 
October 19, 1887. 

After his ordination to the priest- 
hood, May 19, 1894, at Viterbo, he 
was soon sent to Sopriano al Cimino 
where he followed his Vicarship 
with a term as Rector. After that 
he went to Sts. John and Paul as 
Vicar, and then was Rector suc- 
cessively at the Presentation Re- 
treat on Monte Argentaro and at 
Scala Santa in Rome. Afterwards 
he was named Superior of the 
Alumnate at Soriano al Cimino, but 
he remained there but a month, 
being recalled to Rome to he Vicar 
again at Sts. John and Paul. Next 
he was Rector at Monte Argentaro, 
Second Consultor, and finally Su- 
perior at Rocca di Papa. Later he 
returned to Sts. John and Paul to 
take care of his varicose veins, 
from which he suffered, and there 
he was requested by the Communi- 
ty of San Angelo at Vetralla to be 
their spiritual Father, where he 
went gladly with the blessing of 
obedience. 

Besides a superior Father Jerome 



was also a Missionary, esteemed 
and sought after. Mostly he took 
the part of the catechist, and his 
pleasant, simple manner of ex- 
plaining the truths of Faith and 
Christian morality was very at- 
tractive. He possessed the special 
gift of being able to preach to chil- 
dren, and to him fell the lot of giv- 
ing her First Communion to St. 
Mary Goretti. 

The good father was gifted with 
a gay and cheerful disposition, that 
made him very agreeable in a 
gathering. He was much given to 
piety, and nourished a special de- 
votion to the Blessed Mother, of 
whom he spoke with great feeling, 
inspiring the young especially to 
love her tenderly. He greatly loved 
the Congregation, and always glad- 
ly gave himself entirely for it. 
Having inherited from his parents 
a goodly sum of money, he had a 
silver chalice made for each Re- 
treat in the Province. In his last 
illness he gave beautiful examples 
of patience and love for religious 
poverty, never complaining of his 
sufferings and never requesting 
the doctor or special medicines. 

He died on March 11, 1946, in 
the Hospital at Vetralla. 



i (Nicola Pelonzi) of the Presentation Province died on March 11, 1946 in the Vetralla 
Hospital in the 76th year of his life and the 59th of his religious profession. 



32 



RELATIVES 



I. Whoever becomes a Passionist 
should be determined to die to the 
world and his relatives. Accord- 
ingly, a novice is asked among oth- 
er things whether he intends to re- 
nounce any care for worldly matters 
and to be detached from his family 
to the point of not wishing to see 
them again in this life. For this 
reason, postulants are not received 
in a novitiate in their home town, 
unless there is grave reason to do 
so. The same holds for students 
and priests, whenever nearness to 
one's people would give rise to too 
much social communication. 

II. It is expressly forbidden for 
us to visit our home or family. 
This should not be permitted except 
for urgent necessity. An example 
would be the need of settling dis- 
putes among them when the proper- 
ty of the religious himself is in- 
volved. A visit would be allowable 
when one is leaving his native land 
without any hope of ever returning. 
Never could one go home just for 
the joy of seeing his parents, ex- 
cept for grave necessity. This 
holds all the more for family cele- 
brations and the like. 

III. The Regulations speak suf- 
ficiently of visits and of writing 



letters to relatives. It is not forbid- 
den, however, for a religious to 
concern himself within proper lim- 
its in certain cases, for instance, 
the grave necessity of his parents, 
brothers, or sisters. The Superior 
usually allows him to obtain as- 
sistance for them or to give them 
the stipend of his free Mass or any 
other present he may obtain. This 
money must always be kept by some 
superior. 

IV. When parents of a religious 
come to one of our retreats, they 
should be received with all charity. 
All things should be arranged with 
the Superior, so that no abuse will 
creep in and no inconvenience will 
be caused the monastery. It is a 
matter of caution and prudence not 
to implicate the relatives of our 
brethren in keeping deposits, sup- 
plying provisions, making expen- 
ditures, or carrying on any business 
in our name. Exceptions to this 
rule must be very rare and only in 
special cases. Such a practice nev- 
er turns out well and always brings 
trouble. 

RETREAT 

I. The Holy Rule prescribes an 
annual retreat in every monastery. 
The Regulations set this for the 



38 



eight days immediately preceding 
Lent. Hence, the retreat should 
start in the evening of Tuesday af- 
ter Sexagesima Sunday, the feast 
of the Solemn Commemoration of 
the Passion of our Lord Jesus 
Christ. The closing is on the morn- 
ing of the Tuesday before Ash 
Wednesday. However, any just 
cause is sufficient for the General or 
Provincial to anticipate or defer 
the time of retreat, though this is 
not the practice in Italy. The 
same superiors appoint the retreat 
master. 

II. We follow our own method 
of conducting retreats. In the even- 
ing after Compline the preacher 
gives a meditation; after Vespers 
he gives a reformative conference. 
The former lasts an hour, the latter 
forty-five minutes. In each the 
speaker and the audience are seat- 
ed, except for the beginning and 
end of the meditation. The topics 
treated are usually the eternal 
truths, together with other oppor- 
tune subjects, such as the need of 
not receiving the graces of the re- 
treat in vain, of overcoming tepidi- 
ty, of corresponding with the grace 
of one's vocation. There are exhor- 
tations to devotion toward the Pas- 
sion and the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
etc. The reformative conferences 
treat of perfection, of the Rule, of 
the vows. The speaker's chair is 
placed near the altar; he has a ta- 
ble, covered with a cloth, and a 
crucifix in one corner. After the 
conference, all make the Way of the 



Cross. Each day at a suitable time 
the last Mass is celebrated either in 
church or in the choir, each priest 
taking his turn; all the religious 
have to be present. 

III. During this week the ordi- 
nary observance is changed, even 
on Sunday or on any feast that may 
occur. There is no common walk, 
not even on the property; however, 
there is solitary walk as usual. 
During time free from retreat ob- 
servances the priests and clerics go 
to their cells and keep themselves 
occupied with spiritual exercises. 
The brothers do the necessary work 
in their offices, but nothing extra- 
ordinary. Unnecessary visits with 
externs are not permitted in retreat 
time, and insofar as possible the 
priests should not even hear con- 
fessions of seculars in the church. 
There should be special devotion 
in performing the exercises of the 
religious life. Silence and recollec- 
tion should be more carefully kept. 
In recreation a lower tone of voice 
should be used and there should be 
greater reserve. No magazines or 
newspapers are to be read these 
days. The refectory reading is 
usually on the life of our Holy 
Founder. Each religious is careful 
to dispose himself for a fervent 
confession ; each also has a special 
spiritual conference with his direc- 
tor. 

IV. The house should be closed 
to externs during retreat, even to 
those wishing to make a retreat. 
If this cannot be arranged, at least 



34 



they are to be excluded from the 
reformative conferences, although 
they may be admitted to the medi- 
tation. The same holds for the ser- 
vants, if the preacher agrees. 

V. The last morning, a half hour 
after Mass, the speaker gives a 
short talk for the whole community 
assembled in choir. This ends with 
an exhortation on the dispositions 
for renewing our vows. The Su- 
perior reads the usual formula 
clearly and distinctly, so that all 
can similarly repeat the words after 
him. Then the preacher, in surplice 
and white stole, stands before the 
crucifix and urges all to beg the 
blessing of our Lord Jesus Christ 
Crucified. The blessing is given 
with a large crucifix while the for- 
mula is chanted. The retreat mas- 
ter finally intones the Te Deum, 
after which he removes his surplice 
and stole and leaves the choir. The 
rest of the day is free for recrea- 
tion, though in some places the bells 
for the observances are sounded as 
usual. There is Compline in the 
evening, but no mental prayer. 

VI. If it ever happens that a 
retreat preacher cannot be had, 
the Provincial may order the sub- 
stitution of reading from some good 
book treating the same subjects. 
All observances of the day are the 
same, but when the community ga- 
thers together in choir, one of the 
religious reads the selected book 
dearly and slowly, leaving occasion- 
al pauses to give an opportunity to 
meditate the matter. The final bles- 



sing after renovation of vows is 
given privately by the Superior. 

RETREATANTS 

I. From the very beginning it 
has been our custom graciously to 
receive secular men who wish to 
spend a few days of retreat in our 
monasteries. Moreover, we admit 
them even in groups, according to 
the number of available rooms ; in 
this case, one of our religious gives 
them public talks. These retreat- 
ants can be priests, clerics about to 
be ordained, groups of secular men, 
or youths preparing for their first 
Communion. When there are ten 
or twelve men of the same status, 
the sermons should be on the du- 
ties of their state; but if the re- 
treatants are of different conditions, 
the talks should be adapted to the 
needs of the majority present. If 
the retreatants are few in number, 
the Director gathers them together 
and reads from some spiritual book; 
if there are only three or four, each 
does his spiritual reading privately 
in his room. 

II. Priests must always wear 
their cassock when staying in our 
monasteries. They may refrain 
from celebrating Mass two or three 
times, if they wish in order to pre- 
pare themselves for a more detailed 
and fervent confession. Clerics 
about to be ordained should be 
taught the ceremonies and rites of 
celebrating Mass; the same should 
be done even for priests who are 
seen to be in need of it. Young 



35 



men on retreat in preparation for 
their first Communion are to be 
taught carefully their catechism of 
Christian Doctrine and especially 
all that pertains to the sacraments 
of Penance and Holy Eucharist. On 
the day of first Communion there 
can be a special discourse; and if 
they eat with the religious in the 
refectory, the tables can be adorned 
with flowers. 

III. In order to avoid any dis- 
turbances, the retreatants' horari- 
um must be substantially in har- 
mony with that of the community, 
especially the time of prayer, meals, 
rest, and rigorous silence. Special 
attention is given to them at meals ; 
there is always coffee in the morn- 
ing, two pittances at noon, besides 
a dish of vegetables; a fitting sup- 
per is given daily, except on fast 
days of the Church, if they are 
bound by it. The retreatants are 
expected to pay the expenses of 
their stay, as determined by the 
Superior. 

IV. One of our priests is put in 
charge of the retreatants; he is 
called Director. His appointment 
comes from either the Provincial 
or Local Superior. It is his duty to 
welcome the retreatants, to be al- 
ways at their call, and to help them 
in any need ; likewise to give them 
books and anything else necessary 
during their stay. A brother is 
appointed by the Superior to take 
care of the rooms, to dust them 
and arrange them; he shall check 



them twice a day, when the occu- 
pants are busy elsewhere. 

V. From the time of their arrival 
the Director shall make known to 
those under his charge the schedule 
for the various exercises. A small 
bell may be used for summoning 
them, especially if there is a large 
number, or even for a small num- 
ber when other circumstances make 
it necessary. The Director is al- 
ways present for any act of their 
observance; he watches that they 
keep silence in the places and at the 
times that we do. When there is a 
conference in the morning, the Di- 
rector waits until the end of it to 
celebrate Mass for the men, unless 
the Superior appoints another 
priest for this. After the morning 
devotions, the Director takes them 
to breakfast, but in a different place 
— or at least, at a different time — 
from the community. No walk is 
allowed in the morning, but in the 
evening they may walk for a full 
hour within the walls of the retreat, 
or if the solitude of the place per- 
mits, outside the walls. The Direc- 
tor eats with them, either in the 
common refectory or in another 
room ; he watches that all is car- 
ried on with modesty and serious- 
ness, and that nothing is lacking 
to anyone. If a short recreation is 
given them after the thanksgiving, 
the Director makes sure that they 
do not mix with the religious, nor 
indulge in shouting, buffoonery, or 
jests. They are not to play games 
or read newspapers and magazines. 



36 



At the bell for the community rest, 
he takes them in silence to their 
rooms until Vespers. Before their 
walk, they go to the chapel or 
church, where the Director leads 
them in the Stations and in adora- 
tion of the Blessed Sacrament. Af- 
ter supper, thanksgiving, and rec- 
reation as at noon-time, the men say 
the rosary, either separately or with 
the community ; then in silence each 
must go to his room, without wast- 
ing time in useless conversation. 

VI. If any of the retreatants is 
a bishop, even one just elected, the 
Director shall see that there are 
priests and clerics to assist him at 
Mass. All other distinctions due 
to bishops shall be accorded him. 
At meals the Superior yields to 
him the honor of blessing the table 
at the words : Oremus. Benedic, 
Domine. If he is present at Rosa- 
ry, he is given the honor of blessing 
the community with holy water. 

VII. According to the Regula- 
tions (n. 147) the Retreat Director 
should keep a book in which are to 
be entered the names of all who 
make retreats in our monasteries, 
although they have stayed only 
for a few days or to recollect them- 
selves for making a better confes- 
sion. He shall note their name, ad- 
dress, age, status in life, the date 
of arrival and departure, the pur- 
pose for which they have come, and 
anything about them worthy of be- 
ing remembered. Those who ask 
can be given a testimonial of hav- 
ing made a retreat, so that they 



may turn it in to their superiors. 
It is sufficient merely to state that 
the person has attended the re- 
treat ; any other details can be 
given viva voce, if someone with 
a right to know should ask. 

VIII. During the performance of 
his duties the Director is exempted 
from those acts of the common ob- 
servance incompatible with his job. 
When there are only a few retreat- 
ants, he attends all the acts of the 
observance except solitary walk and 
recreation. If however he must 
give them instructions, he makes 
only a half-hour prayer. Finally, if 
there are enough for him to preach 
a formal retreat, he is exempted 
from all the observance, so that he 
may be able to perform his work. 
Let the Director be very watchful, 
since experience has taught that 
not all who come to make retreats 
do so sincerely and in order to gain 
spiritual fruit, especially if they 
have not come willingly. 

ROSARY 

I. The recitation of the rosary in 
common before bed time is an act 
of the regular observance. It is re- 
cited in choir or in some chapel, 
according to the form in our ritual. 
There should be two candles before 
the image of the Blessed Virgin 
.Mary; on the vigils and on first 
class feasts there are four. Apart 
from three days of Holy Week, this 
observance is never omitted, no 

matter what else has taken place 
during the day. In some retreats 



37 



there is a practice to recite the ro- 
sary publicly in the church with 
the people; in these cases it can be 
omitted in the evening, provided 
all the religious have been present 
at the recitation. Then the religious 
go to the customary place and be- 
gin night prayers from the ex- 
amination of conscience. 

III. When retreatants or secu- 
lars are present at rosary, the Di- 
rector leads them out as soon as the 
Superior has finished the antiphon 
Asperges. They go to their rooms 
before the community has left the 
choir. The cleric or brother in 
charge of the lights leaves the 
choir beforehand to light the lamps 
in the corridors. 

III. During the singing of the 
last antiphon a cleric or brother 
kneels before the Superior with the 
aspersorium. After the blessing he 
returns the aspersorium to its place. 
After the last prayer he gives a 
few taps on the bell to indicate the 



rigorous silence. Each then goes to 
his cell. We must note here that it 
is an abuse to prolong the time of 
Rosary by adding prayers. Our 
forebears were ever concerned that 
vocal prayers should not be multi- 
plied at any personal whim, thereby 
destroying uniformity of our ob- 
servance and lessening the time for 
sleep to which the religious, by 
Rule, have a right. 

IV. From Saturday before Pas- 
sion Sunday to Tuesday evening of 
Holy Week, the prayers after the 
examination of conscience are omit- 
ted, and in their place is sung the 
Stabat Mater, half each night, al- 
ternately by cantors and the com- 
munity. The last verse Quando Cor- 
pus morietur is always used, fol- 
lowed by the versicle Or a pro nobis, 
etc. and the prayer Interveniat. On 
Wednesday to Friday of Holy Week 
the rosary is omitted and the en- 
tire Stabat Mater is sung, solemnly 
if possible. 



NOTICE 

Mail to Christ the King Retreat, Citrus Heights, California, has often been 
delayed because of wrong address. The complete new address is: Christ the 
King Retreat, Box 86, Citrus Heights, California. 



NOTICE 



The new telephone number at Immaculate Conception Monastery, Jamaica, 
N.Y., is REpublic 9-2525 (instead of RE. 9-9791). The Rector's phone remains 
REpublic 9-7988. 



38 




GENERAL CURIA 



TO THE VERY REVEREND FATHERS PROVINCIAL OF THE 
CONGREGATION OF THE PASSION 



Very Reverend Father: 

Filled with joy because of the sol- 
emn definition of the Assumption of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary, we cannot 
refrain from communicating our 
happiness to you and to all the Re- 
ligious. 

While we were standing in St. 
Peter's Square before the throne of 
the Supreme Pontiff, who was sur- 
rounded by such a great circle of 
Cardinals and Bishops, before an im- 
mense and applauding multitude of 
the Faithful, and heard from the 
mouth of Christ's Vicar the infalli- 
ble declaration, we seemed to see 
all our Religious rejoicing because of 
the new and shining diadem which 
was being placed on the august 
Queen of Heaven. We seemed to 
see among the Blessed in Heaven our 
Father and Lawgiver exulting with 
a singular joy as being one who. 
while living on earth, had so high an 



opinion of the Assumption of the 
Blessed Virgin Mary and who took 
such pleasure in disposing himself 
for its feast-day by pious exercises 
and mortification. 

We do not wish to pass over in 
silence a thing which may be said 
to have happened by accident in the 
solemn rite, but which is of so much 
honor and happiness to us. The Most 
Reverend Stanislaus Amilcar Battis- 
telli, C.P., while standing near the 
throne of the Pontiff, was called by 
the Master of Ceremonies to ac- 
company with other Bishops and pre- 
lates, His Eminence Cardinal Eugene 
Tisserant in asking the dogmatic 
definition of the Assumption of the 
Virgin Mother of God from the 
Supreme Pontiff! Could it not be 
said that our Congregation, which 
i earned from its Father and Law- 
giver to honor the Assumption with 
a special devotion, prostrate in the 



89 



person of our beloved Bishop at the 
feet of the Vicar of Christ, most 
earnestly besought this most de- 
sired definition? 

Moreover, it is fitting to return 
due thanks to the Supreme Giver of 
all good things for the happy pro- 
nouncement of so solemn a declara- 
tion, which increases in an ineffable 
way the glory of the Mother of God 
and which fills heaven and earth 
with joy; and to implore from Him 
by our prayers that the desires of 
our Holy Father of advancing the 
salvation and sanctification of souls, 
of restoring peace among nations 
and of propagating and establishing 
everywhere the Kingdom of Christ 
may be realized. 

By this present letter, therefore, 
we order that in all our retreats the 
coming Feast of the Presentation of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary on the 21st 
day of this month be celebrated more 
solemnly to give thanks to God and 
to achieve the wishes of the Supreme 
Pontiff. 

In the morning, a Solemn Mass 
will be sung, and in the evening or 
at a more opportune time, before the 
Most August Sacrament solemnly 
exposed, the whole religious family 
will sing the Te Deum and offer up 
fervent prayers to God through the 
intercession of the Immaculate Moth- 
er of God, Who has been assumed 
into Heaven, by reciting the prayer 
recently composed by our Supreme 
Ruler, Pius XII. 

May the Most Blessed Virgin be 
with us from Heaven and implore 
for all the Religious an increase of 
virtue, that walking readily in the 
way of perfection and imbued with 
the spirit of our Holy Father and 



Lawgiver, we may be able to fully 
comply with our vocation. 

Given at Rome, from the Retreat 
of Sts. John and Paul, this 7th day 
of November, 1950. 

With the greatest devotion to- 
wards Your Paternity, 

Albert of the Sorrowful Virgin, 

General of the Cong, of the Passion 



STS. JOHN AND PAUL 

(Rome) 

The Congress on the States of 
Perfection, convoked by the authori- 
ty of the Sacred Congregation of 
Religious, was held at Rome from 
November 26 to December 8 in the 
auditorium of the Apostolic Chan- 
cery. The Sessions of the Congress 
were attended not only by the Su- 
perior General, but also by a con- 
siderable number of other Passion- 
ists, as Congressional representatives 
and auditors. Each talk given during 
the Sessions was accompanied by 
several papers, not read to the as- 
sembly, but for inclusion in the Acts 
of the Congress. It is gratifying to 
note the number of Passionists who 
were chosen to participate, either by 
giving talks or submitting papers. 

Those who gave talks to the Con- 
gress are the following: Most Rev- 
erend Fr. John Mary of the Holy 
Family, C.P., Third General Consul- 
tor, on the subject "The Genuine 
Concept of Religious Obedience"; 
Rev. Fr. Hyacinth of the Blessed 
Sacrament, C.P., Secretary General 
delivered a sermon to the Sisters, in 
the Church of St. Ignatius, on "Re- 
ligious Poverty"; Rev. Fr. Timothy 
of the Sorrowful Virgin, C.P., of th| 
Province of the Side of Jesus, ad- 



40 



dressed the Congress on the subject 
of "The accomodated renovation in 
regard to the method of preaching 
missions to the people." 

Of special note is the fact that our 
Passionist Bishop John Baptist Per- 
uzzo, of Sicily, preached at St. Mary 
Major's to all the assembled relig- 
ious of all Orders and Congregations. 
This was on the occasion of one of 
the four official visits the Religious 
made to gain the Holy Year Indul- 
gence and consecrate themselves 
anew to Reparation, to the Aposto- 
late and to the Sacred Hearts of 
Jesus and Mary. 

The following wrote papers for 
the Congress: Rev. Fr. Stanislaus of 
the Sacred Heart, C.P., a member of 
the French Province who teaches 
Philosophy at the Propaganda Uni- 
versity: "Accommodata renovatio 
statuum perfectionis, quoad Consti- 
tutionem, regimen, disciplinam"; Rev. 
Fr. Sidney (Turner) of the Sacred 
Heart, C.P., of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross: "Quaestiones 
Canonicae circa bona ecclesiastica 
religiosa"; Rev. Fr. Henry of the 
Sorrowful Virgin, C.P., "Collectio 
ac selectio vocationum." "De opere 
Vocationum Religiosarum"; Most 
Rev. Fr. Titus of St. Paul of the 
Cross, C.P., Second General Consul- 
tor, "Scholae apostolicae et Postu- 
latus; diversi Scholarum et Postu- 
latum typi recepti; educatio quae in 
ipsis impertienda est"; Rev. Fr. An- 
selm of the Most Holy Rosary, C.P., 
"Accommodata renovatio circa ra- 
tionem praedicandi missiones ad po- 
pulum"; Very Rev. Fr. Jeremiah of 
St. Paul of the Cross, C.P., Provin- 
cial of the Heart of Mary Province, 
"Accommodata renovatio circa ra- 



tionem tradendi Exercitia Spiritua- 
lia"; Rev. Fr. Ladislaus of Mary Im- 
maculate, C.P., Lector of Canon Law 
at Sts. John and Paul, "De Voca- 
tione Religiosa"; Rev. Fidelis (Rice) 
of the Immaculate Conception, C.P., 
a member of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross, and Rev. Basil of 
Mary Immaculate, C.P., "Apostola- 
tus ordinarius statuum perfectionis. 
Collaborate ad ipsum sodalium non 
sacerdotium." 



A letter from the Secretary of 
State of His Holiness, dated De- 
cember 4, 1950, announced that Rev. 
Fr. Ubaldus of the Name of Mary, 
of the Province of the Most Precious 
Blood, has been appointed Apostolic 
Administrator "ad nutum S. Sedis" 
of the new "Praelatura Nullius" of 
Corocoro, Bolivia. 



Four Spanish students and one 
brother made their final religious 
profession, December 27, at Sts. John 
and Paul. Confraters Emilio, Michel- 
angelo and Pio are the students; 
Emilio the brother. Heretofore sub- 
ject to military service, a new un- 
derstanding with the Holy See h?.s 
now removed that possibility. 



Once again, renovation work has 
begun at Sts. John and Paul, and 
again through the generosity of Car- 
dinal Spellman. This time it was the 
Campanile. The Monastery grew 
up around it in such a way that it 
was integrated into the building, to 
this extent that one of the principal 
stairwells wound up its interior from 
the first to the fourth floor. Now 
this stairway is being abandoned, 
to allow for the restoration of the 



41 



Campanile, and another is being stories, leaving intact the portion 

built elsewhere. The walls of the at the base of the tower, which, in- 

Monastery adjacent to the campanile cidentally, houses the room in which 

have been cut away on the upper Our Holy Founder died. 



Holy Cross Province 



Immaculate Conception 

(Chicago) 

During Advent the Students in 
1st and 2nd Theology received Ton- 
sure and Minor Orders from His Ex- 
cellency, Most Reverend Bernard J. 
Sheil, Auxiliary Bishop of Chicago. 
Accompanying the Bishop was the 
famous Fr. Braun, the Augustinian 
priest attached for many years to 
the American Embassy in Moscow. 



Another welcome addition to the 
Community was the tireless Broth- 
er Gilbert. Together with Mr. Frank 
Smith, the same who is so well 
known to many of the brethren, 
Brother Gilbert is washing the cor- 
ridor walls, and sanding the floors. 



Rev. Fr. Pius and his Refresher 
Course received a rousing welcome. 
All were elated over the course, and 
unanimous in applauding the good 
that it is accomplishing. 



Rev. Fr. Godfrey's book "In Gar- 
ments All Red," a life of St. Mary 
Goretti, which was the first release 
of a new book company formed by 
Paluch Brothers of Chicago, has 
been doing very well since its pub- 
lication. Well over 20,000 copies, in- 
cluding both pocket edition and 
bound volume, have been sold. In- 



cidentally, His Eminence Cardinal 
Stritch honored the inauguration of 
the new Paluch Brothers Book Com- 
pany and its first book by his pres- 
ence at a banquet at the Morrison 
Hotel with Msgr. Lux and Rev. Fitz- 
gerald, two of the Diocesan Clergy 
who rank high in the clean litera- 
ture movement. 

Fr. Godfrey's latest book "Re- 
cruiting for Christ," on the subject 
of vocations in which he has been 
intensely interested during the past 
several years, has been drawing some 
wonderful reviews. "The Priest," 
January, 1951, praises it highly. It 
was picked by the Catholic Literary 
Foundation as the "Book-of-the- 
Month" for February, and among 
other things, won the Marquette Psy- 
chology Approval. "Recruiting For 
Christ" was published by Bruce Pub- 
lishing Company, Milwaukee. 



Holy Cross Retreat 

(Cincinnati) 

Rev. Fr. Cyril Mary, C.P. took his 
physical examination for active mili- 
tary duty on December 19, and was 
recalled around the 15th of February. 



The Members of the St. Paul of 
the Cross Laymen's Retreat Guild 
surprised Rev. Fr. Charles, Retreat 
Director, with a Christmas gift: a 



42 





M ii^P^ «H 


I r 

EL 






1 ! ■lp';rf:l€illfe:;i : 


■ 




B 




Hb -mSB " By " *8B 


mm 

■ 



At the recent convention of the N.C.W.C, His Eminence, Samuel Cardinal Stritch, D.D., 
endorses "In Garments All Bed," the life of St. Mary Goretti, by Rev. Fr. Godfrey, C.P., 
as an example of the best in Catholic literature. Above, (1. to r.,) Fr. Fitzgerald, Chap- 
lain of the N.C.W.C, Mrs. Reilly, President, Mrs. Sullivan, Vice-President, Msgr. Curry, 
Director of Catholic Women's League and His Eminence, Cardinal Stritch. 




43 



new 16 mm Movie Projector. The 
Projector will be used to show the 
Christopher film "You Can Change 
The World." This film put out by 
Fr. James Keller, M.M., and the 
Christopher Movement is a weekly 
presentation to the men on Retreat. 



The Laymen's Retreat Guild held 
its Second Annual Rally at the Old 
Cathedral on Thanksgiving Day. 
1500 men attended the Missa Reci- 
tata, and over 1000 Holy Commu- 
nions were distributed. The Rally 



opened with the singing of the hymn 
in honor of Christ the King — the 
hymn that in Cincinnati has come to 
be synonymous with the Laymen's 
Retreats at Holy Cross Monastery. 
The Most Rev. Karl J. Alter, D.D., 
Archbishop of Cincinnati, said the 
Mass and preached the sermon at 
his own request. The Archbishop 
vested at the throne, and used Mitre 
and Crosier. Afterwards he re- 
marked on the volume of the men's 
responses during the Mass; it sound- 
ed as though they had given a great 




Mr. Charles Eppinghoff, one of the Vice-Presidents of the Retreat Guild, presents Rev. 
Fr. Charles, C.P., Retreat Director, with the special pictures he donated for the Second 
Annual Rally Mass. 



44 






The Annual Rally of the St. Paul of the Cross Laymen's Retreat Guild, 
Cathedral, Cincinnati, Ohio, on Thanksgiving Day, 1950. 



at the Old 




45 



deal of time to practise it. 

Fr. Nicholas Gelin, S.J., Director 
of Retreats for the Men of Milford, 
and Fr. Gerard Brinkman, O.F.M., 
Retreat Master at Friarhurst, were 
Chaplains to- the Archbishop during 
the Mass. Fr. Edward McCarthy, 
Secretary to the Archbishop, was 
Master of Ceremonies. Very Rev. 
Fr. Gilbert, C.P., Rector, and Rev. 
Fr. Robert, C.P., Retreat Master, 
heard confessions both before and 
during the Mass, and together with 
the Archbishop and Fr. Charles, C.P., 
distributed Holy Communion during 
the Mass. Rev. Fr. Charles directed 
the Missa Recitata from a micro- 
phone in the Sanctuary. Fr. Theo- 
dore Hesselbrock, O.F.M., Director of 
Retreats at Friarhurst, and Rev. Fr. 
Raphael, C.P., assisted in the Sanc- 
tuary. Mr. William Albers, K.C.S.G., 
National Regional Vice-President of 
the Laymen's Retreat Movement, and 
President of Crusade Castle Retreats, 
treats, and Mr. Robert Otto, Presi- 
dent of the St. Paul of the Cross 
Laymen's Retreat Guild, were the 
acolytes. Seven other laymen of the 
executive board for Mt. Adams' Re- 
treatants assisted in the pontifical 
functions as servers. 

In his sermon the Most Rev. Arch- 
bishop stressed the necessity for lay- 
men to aid in the spread of the 
Faith — taking the Catholic Religion 
into the marketplace. A realization 
of this, he said, is given the men who 
make a Closed Retreat. 

The old Cathedral was fittingly 
decorated for the occasion. Papal 
bunting and two "Signs", almost 
six feet tall, were hung from the pil- 
lars at the entrance of the Cathedral. 
Two and one-half foot crosses, bear- 



ing the inscriptions "St. Paul of the 
Cross" and the "Sign", hung on the 
fence and pillars around the plaza. 
There were forty-eight of them in 
all, twenty-four in silver and an 
equal number in gold. The Papal 
and American flags were erected 
over the entrance, and a large sign 
at the corner of the plaza pointed 
out that this was the Second Annual 
Rally of. the St. Paul of the Cross 
Laymen's Retreat Guild. An eight 
foot picture of St. Paul of the Cross 
hung over the Main Altar, thirty 
feet above the floor of the Sanctua- 
ry. 



Sacred Heart Retreat 

(Louisville) 

December 23 saw the Ordination 
of our seven Subdeacons to the Dia- 
conate. Most Rev. John A. Floersh, 
D.D., Archbishop of Louisville, per- 
formed the Ordination ceremony in 
St. Agnes Church. He was assisted 
by Rt. Rev. Msgr. Driscoll and Msgr. 
Van Bogaert. The seven new Dea- 
cons are Fathers Melvin, Emmet, 
Kent, Michael, Ward, Bernardine and 
Dominic. 



You can't keep a good man down, 
the saying goes. After months of 
racks and ropes on a hospital bed, 
the Community was happy to wel- 
come back Rev. Fr. Campion. One 
evening, late last August, as Father 
Campion was making his way to the 
Preparatory Seminary at St. Louis, 
to take up his first teaching assign- 
ment, his auto was struck by an- 
other car in a head-on collision. Then 
followed the long hospitalization for 
a broken leg, arm and other injuries. 



46 



Father Campion is now able to get 
around with the aid of a cumbersome 
steel and leather leg brace. 



The Community was happy to play 
host to three Trappist Fathers. A 
sudden snow storm, December 19, 
blocked all roads leading out of 
Louisville. Three Trappists, who had 
spent a short time at St. Joseph In- 
firmary for medical treatment, found 
themselves stalled a distance out of 
the City, but were able to make 
their way as far back as the Retreat. 
We were glad to repay Gethsemani's 
many kindnesses, and give them shel- 
ter for the nighet. Incidentally, one 
of the three was Father Louis, the 
former Thomas Merton of "Seven 
Storey Mountain" fame. 



The Community is happy to take 
this opportunity to extend its thanks 
to Rev. Fr. Edwin for his inspiring 
Community Retreat, Dec. 10-17. 



St. Francis Retreat 

(St. Paul) 
One day in early December, the 
Retreat was given another vivid 
proof of the deep Catholic spirit of 
its surroundings. As the threat of a 
possible third world war gathered 
momentum on all sides, one of the 
St. Paul Catholics began to gather a 
crowd of people for the recitation of 
the Rosary for Peace. Before seven 
o'clock that same evening there were 
so many, both Catholic and Protes- 
tant, who wanted to say the Rosary 
for Peace that the Basement Chapel 
of St. Francis Church would not 
hold them all. Some were forced to 
stand outside. The next evening, of 
course, the Rosary was said upstairs 
in the Church, and drew an even 
larger crowd. Since then, there has 
been a crowd every evening at seven 
o'clock. So many Protestants were 
showing up, that they now have ser- 
vices in their own Church. 



Seven Students who received the Diaconate. Front row (1. to r.) Fathers Ward, Ber- 
nardine and Dominie. Back row, Fathers Emmet, Melvin, Michael and Kent. 



vlfo 



r 



**& 



Q 



\ 



h; 



% ^*.S 



December saw another welcome 
increase in the number of Brother 
Novices. The two who received the 
holy habit from the hands of Rev. 
Fr. Cormac, C.P., December 7, were 
Brothers Francis and Leonard. An- 
other, Brother Joachim, received the 
habit earlier. 



Sunday, December 17, gave the Re- 
ligious and the people of St. Paul the 
great privilege of a visit from the 
Pilgrim Virgin, the statue of Our 
Lady of Fatima. Accompanying the 
statue were Msgr. McGrath, of Can- 
ada, and Fr. Stringer. Fr. Stringer 
preached on the meaning of Fatima 
to an audience that completely filled 
the Church to the doors. 



On January 6, Brother Louis re- 
ceived the news that his uncle, Rev. 
Fr. Louis Hochendoner, C.P., depart- 
ed this life a few minutes after mid- 
night, December 30, at Holy Cross 
Retreat, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Fr. 
Louis was born in Clarion County, 
Pennsylvania, August 7, 1856. He 
was professed August 14, 1873 and 
ordained March 13, 1880. Several 
years after his ordination, Fr. Louis 
went to Argentina, where he spent 
the next 63 years labouring for souls. 
At the time of his death, Fr. Louis 
was the oldest member of the Con- 
gregation, both in age and profes- 
sion. Brother Louis tells us that Fr. 
Louis was one of the persons instru- 
mental in having the invocation "Re- 
gina Congregationis nostrae" added 
to the Litany. 



St. Gabriel Retreat 

(Des Moines) 
Final Profession, perennial source 
of inspiration, took place at St. Ga- 
briel's again. Brother John C.P. (Ge- 
baur) made his final vows Novem- 
ber 9, in the presence of the Com- 
munity. 



The new "Refresher Course" in 
Sacred Eloquence was inaugurated 
in St. Gabriel's Retreat during De- 
cember. It was a most encouraging 
beginning, and practically all the 
priests took part in the course. All 
were highly pleased, and came away 
with renewed spirit and zeal. Rev. 
Fr. Pius, Lector, was especially en- 
couraged. The "Refresher Course" 
is arranged in a five year cycle, cov- 
ering all phases of sermon writing 
and preaching proper to the Congre- 
gation. 



Rev. Fr. Noel was transferred to 
Chicago, to be Assistant Pastor at 
Immaculate Conception Church, fill- 
ing the place left vacant there since 
Rev. Fr. Quentin was transferred to 
Sierra Madre. Brother John also 
went to Chicago. Brother Thomas 
now fills the office of cook. 



Mater Dolorosa 

(Sierra Madre) 

Rev. Fr. Quentin arrived to replace 
Rev. Fr. Harold as Assistant Pastor 
of St. Rita's, in Sierra Madre. Fr. 
Quentin was not here long before he 
was called home by the serious ill- 
ness of his father, the second such 
in a very short time. January 1, Rev. 



48 



Fr. Clyde, of the Sacred Eloquence 
Class, was called home by the death 
of his mother, Mrs. William Zarski, 
in Chicago. 



Rev. Fr. Daniel gave a very in- 
spiring Annual Retreat to the Com- 
munity from Jan. 6 to 13. The Com- 
munity wishes to thank Father Dan- 
iel for his inspiring, practical con- 
ferences. 



Mater Dolorosa sports a new ten- 
nis court. The new court, laid in 



asphalt, lies between the pepper trees 
directly south of the garage. The 
Student-priests are working on a 
stone wall around the court, and the 
back-stop. Mr. William Shiltz is 
helping them as technical adviser on 
the walls. None better could be had. 
Mr. Shiltz, single-handed, built all 
the stone walls and curbing at Sier- 
ro Madre Retreat. His also is the 
Lourdes grotto. 

Mater Dolorosa Laymen's Retreat 
House, under the capable leadership 
of Rev. Fr. Isidore, C.P., and the in- 



\,> 




The first mid-week retreat at Mater Dolorosa Retreat House. In front are (1. to r.> 
Fr. Isidore. ( 1\, and Fr. Stephen Mary, CI*. 



49 



spiring preaching of Rev. Fr. Ste- 
phen Mary, C.P., is pioneering again 
— in one of the ways deemed "most 
necessary" by the last National Re- 
treat Convention: mid-week retreats. 
The first was held Nov. 6-8, 1950. 
Thirty men made the retreat. 



wrong address. The new Retreat is 
located 12 miles east of Sacramento, 
in Citrus Heights. The complete 
mailing address is: Christ the King 
Retreat, P.O. Box 86, Citrus Heights, 
California. 



Christ the King 

(Sacramento) 
The Laymen's Retreats at the new 
Retreat House are being very well 
attended, every week, and the in- 
terest in Laymen's Retreats is 
spreading. This is attested by the 
fact that only three or four week- 
ends this year are not yet taken. 



Holy Name Retreat 

(Houston) 
The plans for the new Laymen's 
Retreat House are now in the draw- 
ing stage. Very Rev. Fr. Neil, Pro- 
vincial Consultor and construction 
supervisor, spent two early Decem- 
ber weeks in Houston. The prelimi- 
nary sketches will be completed soon, 
and an estimate can be reached as to 
the cost of the first unit. 



Christ the King Retreat, despite 
the fewness of its numbers, carried 
out a rather full Fall Mission Sched- 
ule. 

Christ the King Retreat reports 
that a considerable volume of its 
mail is delayed by being sent to the 



The annual Sponsors' Dinner, of 
the St. Paul of the Cross Club, was 
held at the Texas State Hotel, No- 
vember 29. Rev. Fr. Clarence gave 
the principal talk of the evening, 
taking as his subject St. Paul of the 




Another view of the beautiful new Christ the King Betreat, at Citrus Heights, California. 
50 



Cross, and bringing out that diffi- 
culties which St. Paul had in build- 
ing his first Monastery. "Every good 
work," he said, "must bear the 
mark of the Cross to prove that it 
is of God." 



Holy Name Retreat House has an- 
nounced its list of Recollection Days 
for 1951. High on the list are the 
Recollection Days for the Diocesan 
Clergy, Jan. 30, 31 and Feb. 1. 
These Days will be preached by Rev. 
Fr. Regis, C.P. 



Our Parishes 

The Church of the Immaculata has 

a new Pastor. Formerly the Admin- 
istrator of the parish, Rev. Fr. Cy- 
prian's status was changed when 
Most Rev. Karl J. Alter, D.D., Arch- 
bishop of Cincinnati, made all Ad- 
ministrators Pastors. Consequently, 
Fr. Cyprian was officially installed as 
Pastor of Immaculata December 10, 
by Monsignor Gressle, Pastor of St. 
Elizabeth's Church. 



Instead of the Block Rosary, in 
Holy Cross Parish, Rev. Fr. Arthur, 

C.P., has inaugurated the Rosary in 
the Church every evening through- 
out the year. The attendance has 
been very edifying. The men of the 
Parish have completed the redecora- 
tion of the Assembly Hall and Gym- 
nasium in the basement of Holy 
Cross School. Appropriately, Rev. 
Fr. James' basketball team is lead- 
ing the F.O.P. (Police) League. 



Cousins, Auxiliary Bishop of Chica- 
go, November 28. The next evening 
the Annual Novena in honor of the 
Immaculate Conception was opened 
by Rev. Fr. Arnold, C.P., who 
preached an inspiring novena series. 
The parish lost one of its Assistants, 
when Rev. Fr. Quentin, C.P. was 
made Assistant at St. Rita's Church, 
Sierra Madre, Calif. Shortly after- 
ward, Rev. Fr. Noel, C.P. was ap- 
pointed to take his place as Assist- 
ant at Immaculate Conception. 



The New Hall in St. Gemma's Par- 
ish, Detroit, is practically completed. 
Many delays caused by strikes and 
lack of materials slowed down con- 
struction considerably. However, the 
Parish is well pleased with its new 
Hall. 



Confirmation was administered at 
Immaculate Conception Church, Nor- 
wood Park, by Most Rev. William 



Rev. Fr. Canute, C.P., Superior at 
the St. Joseph Retreat, gave the 
first high school retreat to our Stu- 
dents at Holy Family High, from 
Jan. 22 to 24. The High School is 
gradually extending its activities. 
This year also marks its first year 
of" active competition with other 
schools in sports, thanks to the gym- 
nasium erected through the tireless 
efforts of Rev. Fr. Eustace. 

1950 produced a bumper crop of 
converts. A total of 62 more ac- 
cepted the grace of God and entered 
the Church, during the past year. 

The Veterans of Foreign Wars 
took all the children and their teach- 
ers, the Felician Sisters, to the circus 
recently. Incidentally, it was the 
first time some of the Sisters had 
ever seen a circus. 



51 



ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 
PROVINCE 

The war in Korea, which at pres- 
ent writing looks ominously like a 
third world war creeping up on us, 
has become more real to us in virtue 
of the fact that several of the priests 
of our province have been called up- 
on for mission work among the U.S. 
military forces here at home. The 
following account of these activities 
was lately made public and published 
in the Nov. 18 issue of The Tablet, 
of Brooklyn, N. Y. 

"Two veteran Passionist mission- 
aries who during World War II gave 
missions to American forces in Eur- 
ope and the Far East, have resumed 
duties as auxiliary chaplains by giv- 
ing missions to U. S. Air Force per- 
sonnel stationed throughout the 
South. — They are Rev. Terence Bro- 
die, C.P., and Rev. Adrian Poletti, 
C.P., who have just completed mis- 
sions to the Air Force at Barksdale 
Air Force Base, La., and MacDill 
Air Base, Fla. They are scheduled 
to give other missions at Chatham 
Air Force Base, Fla., and Hunter 
Air Force Base, Ga. — The first closed 
retreat for Air Force Chaplains 
from all over the U. S. was inaugu- 
rated two years ago at the Passion- 
ist Retreat House, Jamaica, N. Y. — 
Fr. Brodie, an Army Chaplain from 
1943-45, served on Okinawa and on 
Saipan where he gave 22 missions. 
While in Korea, at the invitation of 
Bishop Patrick J. Byrne, M.M., now 
Apostolic Delegate, he conducted a 
mission at the Cathedral in Seoul 
which was desecrated by the Korean 
Reds during their occupation of the 
capital this Summer. Bishop Byrne, 



a native of Washington, D. C, was 
taken prisoner by the Korean Reds 
during their retreat from Seoul. — Fa- 
ther Poletti, while serving as chap- 
lain in England from 1942-46, gave 
20 missions to the 8th Air Force to 
which he was attached. He led an 
American pilgrimage to the historic 
Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham. 
Father Brodie is a native of Maiden, 
Mass. Father Poletti is a native of 
Union City." 



On Nov. 5th, 1950, occurred the 
death of Mrs. Catherine P. Mickel, 
the mother of Fr. Walter Mickel of 
our province, who has for some years 
been associated with our German 
foundation and who now holds the 
post of provincial there. The death 
of Mrs. Mickel occurred on the very 
day when Father Walter arrived 
back in Germany after a visit of 
several months at home here in the 
States. 

It must have been a special cause 
of bereavement for Father Walter 
that circumstances made it impossi- 
ble for him to be present at the 
death and funeral of his beloved 
mother. But he had at least the con- 
solation of visiting her only a few 
days before her death. He had been 
enjoying a rest of several months 
here at home by order of Father 
General because of failing health 
as was evident from his appearance 
on his arrival home several months 
ago. But when the time came for the 
return to his post less than a week 
before his mother's death, his health 
had greatly improved, for, according 
to his own statement, he was feeling 
fit again. Fr. Walter planned his 
arrival in Germany by air on Nov. 



52 



5th, and on that very day his good 
mother passed to her eternal reward. 
As it was impossible for Fr. Walter 
to be present at the funeral, he will 
have the consolation of knowing 
that there was a very large attend- 
ance of our brethren from neighbor- 
ing monasteries and also a numerous 
group of secular clergy. The local 
pastor, Fr. Morissey, was celebrant 
of the mass and Very Rev. Berch- 
mans Lanagan was deacon and 
preacher and Fr. Lambert Missach 
was subdeacon. R. I. P. 



Nov. 13th, 1950 was a notable date 
for Fr. Wendelin Meis, C.P. who is 
stationed at our St. Michael's Parish 
in Pittsburgh, Pa., and Fr. Justinian, 
who has been living in the Argentine 
Province for the last twenty years. 
That date marks the fiftieth anni- 
versary of the religious profession 
of these two fathers. 

Father Wendelin Meis was born 
May 3, 1884, in Pittsburgh, the son 
of the late William and Teresa Im- 
mekus Meis. He was ordained priest 
June 13, 1908, by the late Bishop 
John J. O'Connor in the Cathedral 
in Newark. He began his priestly 
career as a curate at St. Mary's 
Church, Dunkirk, and in 1911 was 
transferred to St. Michael's Monas- 
tery Church, Union City. He re- 
mained until 1927 when he was as- 
signed to St. Joseph's parish, Balti- 
more. — Two years later he was elect- 
ed rector of St. Paul's Monastery 
Church, Pittsburgh. Thereafter he 
was appointed to St. Michael's Pas- 
sionist parish in the same place, 
where he has been engaged in par- 
ish work for the last 17 years. 

"A native son of Ireland, Father 



Tobin was born Jan. 14th, 1876, the 
son of the late Thomas and Mary 
Keating. Ordained June 30, 1906, by 
the late Bishop Michael J. Hoban, 
of Scranton, Father Tobin served 
as pastor of St. Michael's Church, 
Union City, and St. Joseph's Church, 
Baltimore, before embarking on a 
missionary career in South America. 
For the last 20 years he has served 
at St. Paul's Passionist Monastery 
at Capitan Sarmiento, La Plata, 
near Buenos Aires, Argentina. 



Of special interest to all the breth- 
ren of the province has been the six- 
tieth anniversary of Very Reverend 
Fr. Victor Koch, now in Germany, 
and of Brother Valentine Rausch, 
of Immaculate Conception Monas- 
tery, Jamaica, N.Y. Since these two 
Passionists, the priest and the lay- 
brother, made their religious pro- 
fession on Dec. 2, 1890 at the same 
ceremony in St. Paul's Monastery, 
Pittsburgh, Pa., it is appropriate that 
the following personal notice of their 
anniversary should include both. 
Several articles appeared both in the 
religious and the secular press. The 
following article is taken from The 
Tablet, Brooklyn, N. Y., Dec. 9, 
1950. 

"Union City, N. J., Dec. 5— The 
American-born founder of the Pas- 
sionist Fathers in Germany and his 
octogenarian companion, a World 
War II prisoner of war, observed 
their 60th year as Passionists last 
Saturday (Dec. 2).— They are the 
Very Rev. Victor Koch, C.P., of 
Schwarzenfeld, Germany, first Pro- 
vincial of the German and Austrian 
Vice Province of the Congregation of 
the Passion, and Brother Valentine 



53 



Rausch, C.P., of Immaculate Con- 
ception Monastery, Jamaica, N.Y. — 
In honor of Brother Valentine, the 
Passionist community at Jamaica 
and the senior Brothers of the Pro- 
vince attended a Solemn Mass of 
Thanksgiving ; today in the monas- 
tery chapel, sung by the students' 
choir. The Mass was celebrated by 
Rev. Michael Rausch, C.P.,? a cousin 
of the jubilarian, assisted by the 
Very Rev. Berchmans Lanagan, C.P., 
Monastery rector, and Rev. Basil 
Cavanaugh, C.P., Vicar. Following 
the Mass, Brother, Valentine was 
feted at a dinner in the Monastery. 

Religious and civic leaders, headed 
by the Mayor of Schwarzenfeld, at- 
tended Father Koch's jubilee Mass 
on the day of his profession. 
Throughout the day, Father Koch re- 
ceived the congratulatory good wish- 
es of thousands of Catholics and 
non-Catholics who were saved dur- 
ing World War II when the vener- 
able priest; pleaded with the occupa- 
tion forces that the city and its peo- 
ple be spared. A Plaque testifying 
to the priest's bravery was presented 
the monastery as a gift of the grate- 
ful citizenry. 

Brother Valentine, who came to 
this country from Germany on a cat- 
tleboat when 10 years old with his 
parents, the late Nicholas and Eliza- 
beth :*Sturmef Rausch, was the only 
American Passionist in Germany to 
be repatriated in 1942, returning to 
the U.S. in July aboard the S.S.' 
Drottingholm, sister ship of the 
Gripsholm. Held prisoner within the 
Monastery of Schwarzenfeld, Broth- 
er Valentine made the cross-conti- 
nent trip to Lisbon, Portugal, via 
France and Spain, in a box car with 



other prisoners of war being repatri- 
ated. The octogenarian Brother, who 
has served as a tailor and as an in- 
firmarian in most of the Passionist 
Monasteries in Eastern U.S., was 
asked to come to Europe in 1926 by 
Father Koch to train the Brothers 
at the Passionist novitiate in Vienna. 
He remained in the German Province 
working with Father Koch for 16 
years. He was born September 2, 
1870, in Reupelsdorf in the diocese 
of Wurzburg, now headed by his 
childhood classmate Cardinal Faul- 
haber. He has been an American 
citizen since 1889. 

Father Koch, who served as rector 
of St. Paul's Monastery, Pittsburgh, 
and as pastor of St. Joseph's Mon- 
astery parish, Baltimore, was dele- 
gated by the Passionist Superior 
General in Rome to go to Europe in 
1922 to establish the Passionist Fa- 
thers in Germany and Austria. He 
remained in Germany until 1947 
when he came to the United States 
to raise funds for the German 
Foundation. Born May 25, 1873, in 
Hermitage, Pa., he was ordained 
Sept. 19, 1896, in St. Michael's Mon- 
astery by the late Bishop W. Wigger 
of Newark. He celebrated the golden 
jubilee of his ordination in 1946 in 
his own monastery in Germany. At 
present, Father Koch holds the posi- 
tion of First Provincial Corisultor 
to the Very Rev. Walter Mickel, C.P., 
Provincial. Father Mickel, a native 
of Fort Lee, N. J., returned last 
month to Germany after a brief 
visit in the United States. Father 
Koch is a brother of Albert Koch, of 
Sharon, Pa., and a cousin of four 
priests, Rev. Benedict Huck, C.P., 
Superior, Passionist Fathers, River- 



54 



dale, N. Y., Rev. Roland Flaherty, 
C.P., of Schwarzenfeld, Germany, 
Rev. Basil Bauer, C.P., a missionary 
of the Passionist Diocese of Yuan- 
ling, now under the Chinese Com- 
munist regime, and Rt. Rev. Msgr. 
Joseph Mehler, pastor, St. Sylvester's 
Church, Woodsfield, Ohio. In 1940, 
Father Koch and Brother Valentine 
celebrated their 50th anniversary of 
their profession together in Germany. 
Today, separated by two continents, 
they celebrated their 60th year as 
Passionists, united in religious spirit 
and happy memories." 

In his sermon on the occasion of 
Brother Valentine's Jubilee, Rev. Fr. 
Aloysius McDonough, C.P., remarked 
on the great happiness of the occa- 
sion, and said, in part: 

"In September of 80 years ago, an 
infant soul was born into the world, 
in the Bavarian village of Reupels- 
dorf. A few days later, that soul 
was born again — of baptismal water 
and the Holy Spirit. What we know 
now, was at that time God's secret, 
that Valentine's 'grace of a lifetime' 
would flower into a religious voca- 
tion — a seed planted by our holy 
Founder, watered by some of the 
earliest American Passionists, God 
Himself giving the increase to one 
of the sturdiest Passion Flowers that 
ever was or ever will be. 

70 years ago, steam powered ships 
were still among the latest wonders 
of the world. An Atlantic crossing 
was still a hazard and a process of 
hastening slowly. As emigrants, the 
Rausch family sailed from Bremer- 
haven on All Saints' Day of 1880, ar- 
riving as immigrants at Baltimore 
on Presentation Day, enroute to their 
new home in the New World. 



60 years ago, after quite some time 
as house boy at St. Michael's, Pitts- 
burgh, and after an old fashioned 
novitiate at the Monte Argentaro of 
the American Provinces, Brother 
Valentine became a professional Re- 
ligious, a supernatural son of St. 
Paul of the Cross. 

Were our venerable and venerated 
Jubilarian to sketch for us the story 
of those 60 years, the panoramic re- 
view would be both interesting and 
edifying. It would interest us keenly, 
to study a composite picture of those 
many years, exemplifying as they do, 
Brother Valentine's versatility — ac- 
complishments that made him so 
efficient in the corporal works of 
mercy; so valuable — rather, so in- 
valuable, in doors and out of doors, 
in communities of the West and the 
East, and for 16 years amid the pio- 
neer circumstances of Germany and 
Austria .... 

Brother Valentine is the Dean of 
all our Passionist Brothers in this 
country, and ranks at least fifth 
among the Brother Jubilarians of 
the entire Congregation. In apprais- 
ing the edification of any brother 
Religious, the time element is a sa- 
lient factor. Even a weakling may 
persevere for a while. But to be 
faithful — so faithful for a span of 
60 long years is an achievement so 
unique that, it can be realized ade- 
quately and appreciated exprimental- 
ly, only by the ancients among us . . . 

A jubilee of 60 years is symbolized 
by the diamond, as a precious stone 
which bespeaks a refined purity of 
composition, durability, and a brilli- 
ance of aspect, — a symbolism most 
appropriate on this occasion. This 
is. indeed, a red-letter day for the 



55 



Province of St. Paul of the Cross — 
an occasion for an exultant Te De- 
um, for a grateful Magnificat, for a 
Nunc Dimittis, if you will. The spirit 
of thanksgiving which we share with 
our venerable Jubilarian is well cli- 
maxed and keynoted by the follow- 
ing communication." 

APOSTOLIC DELEGATION 
Washington, D. C. 
Reverend and dear Brother Valen- 
tine Rausch, C.P.: 

I am pleased to inform you that 
on this joyous occasion of the cele- 
bration of the Diamond Jubilee of 
your Religious Profession, our Most 
Holy Father, Pope Pius XII, has 
very graciously deigned to bestow 
upon you his special Apostolic Bene- 
diction. This Blessing is granted as 
a token of the paternal affection of 
His Holiness, in recognition of sixty 
years of devoted service to the Di- 
vine Master and to your Congrega- 
tion, and as a pledge of heavenly 
favors for the years that lie ahead. 

It is the express wish of the Vicar 
of Christ that this Blessing be shared 
by the members of your Community, 
and by your relatives and friends 
who join with you in celebrating this 
happy anniversary. 

While conveying to you this au- 
gust message of the Sovereign Pon- 
tiff, I wish to add my own personal 
congratulations and good wishes. 

With sentiments of esteem and 
with renewed felicitations, I remain 

Sincerely yours in Christ, 

(signed) Amleto Giovanni Cicognani 

Archbishop of Laodicea 

Apostolic Delegate 



Here are some recent communica- 
tions from Union City regarding our 
religious in China. 

"We received a letter from Bishop 
Cuthbert in China requesting us to 
inform the Brethren to be very 
careful about incorporating in their 
letters to China anything that might 
offend the Communists. He also re- 
quested that we be very careful of 
the information we give to the press. 
It seems anything critical of the 
Red regime is held against our 
men living in China." (Provincial 
letter, Oct. 2nd, 1950). — "Last night 
we received a cablegram from Bishop 
Cuthbert informing us that Father 
Raphael had a stroke. There were 
no other details. Kindly recommend 
Father Raphael to the prayers of 
the Community." (Provincial letter, 
Nov. 17th, 1950) 

"Although the Christmas season 
will have come and gone by the time 
this item is published, the following 
reminder from Fr. Emmanuel, mis- 
sion Procurator, regarding the writ- 
ing of Christmas greetings to China, 
has an all-year-round application be- 
cause of their sense of isolation in a 
hostile environment and the hearten- 
ing effect of mail from back home. 
Fr. Emmanuel says: "May I take 
this occasion to suggest that Christ- 
mas greetings to the missionaries be 
given particular consideration this 
year? Being virtual prisoners of the 
Reds, their sense of isolation must be 
keen during the Christmas season. 
The letters we receive from them 
make frequent mention of their de- 
sire to receive news of activities and 
events in the Province. Letters may 
be mailed directly to the missions. 
The Post Office sells a ten cent air- 



56 



mail form which is very convenient. 
Airmail gets through to Hunan in 
about three weeks." (Nov. 17th, 
1950). 

"On the Feast of Christ the King, 
Bishop Cuthbert is celebrating the 
15th anniversary of his Consecration 
as Bishop. While I sent him a cable 
of congratulation in the name of all 
the members of the Province, I 
thought it might be well to call the 
attention of all the brethren to this 
fact in case some would care to send 
him a personal letter of congratula- 
tion even though it will arrive late. 
All the news coming out of China is 
pessimistic. The only good news is 
that Bishop Cuthbert is ordaining a 
native for the Diocese on the Feast 
of Christ the King." (Oct. 27th, 1950) 



PASSIONISTS ABROAD 
Central Italy 

From the columns of the "L'Os- 
servatore Romano" comes this in- 
teresting account of the new "Via 
Crucis" at the Retreat of S. Angelo, 
in the Province of the Presentation. 

"The pilgrim travelling along the 
Via Cassia at Vetralla . . . can see on 
the imposing side of Mt. Fogliano a 
large white structure slightly hidden 
between the trees. It is the Retreat 
of the Passionist Fathers, S. Angelo. 
There for over twenty years St. Paul 
of the Cross lived and received such 
extraordinary graces that his life 
was more in heaven than on earth. 
The most beautiful of the letters of 
his collection, published in 1924, bear 
the mark of "S. Angelo." In the 
catalogue of the superiors of this 
Retreat, next to that of St. Paul, we 
find names famous for sanctity and 



learning, such as that of Fr. John 
Baptist, brother of the Saint, and 
St. Vincent Mary Strambi, canonized 
this Holy Year. 

It is fitting that such a holy place 
be approached in a fitting manner. 
And what manner is more fitting 
than the Passion of Christ? What 
was so much in the spirit of the 
Apostle of the Crucified and his sons 
has been done: for more than five 
thousand feet along the approach 
there now arises the Way of the 
Cross. The Stations are carved from 
peperine vulcanite rock. Each stands 
about 8 feet tall, while there is a 
distance of close to 400 feet from one 
to the other. 

The approach being communal 
property, the Rector of S. Angelo, 
in 1948, sought the authorization to 
construct the Stations on this land; 
the permission was graciously given, 
and the work began, slowly and la- 
boriously, toward the realization of 
the project. Now complete, it has 
been crowned by the unanimous 
satisfaction of all, by the pleasure of 
the Bishop, Msgr. Adelchi Albonesi, 
and by the Blessing of the Holy Fa- 
ther. The inauguration took place 
November 19, in the presence of an 
estimated 2000 people." 



The Province of the Pieta re- 
joiced in the ordination of one of its 
Students to the Priesthood. Rev. Fr. 
David, C.P., after ilness had delayed 
his Ordination with his class, was 
made a priest of God Oct. 21, 1950. 
The beautiful ceremony was held in 
the Chapel of St. Gabriel, at Isola. 
His Excellency, Msgr. Benedetto Fal- 
cucci, Bishop of Pescara, was the 
ordaining prelate. The following day 



57 



the young Ordinandi sung his First 
Mass, amid a setting of splendor and 
happiness. Ad multos annos! 

On the evening of November 15, 
the relics of St. Vincent Mary Stram- 
bi were carried in a triumphal pro- 
cession from Recanati to Loretto, 
to the Basilica of Our Lady, where 
a triduum in honor of the Saint was 
held from the 16th to the 19th. 
From all accounts, the affair must 
have been a splendid one. Several 
Bishops took part in the processions 
and the ceremonies: Msgr. Amilcare 
Battistelli, C.P., Bishop of Fitigliano 
and Soana, Msgr. Luigi Cessio, Bish- 
op of Recanati, Msgr. Vincenzo Cas- 
sulo, Bishop of Macerata and Tol- 




entino, and Msgr. Gaetano Malchio- 
di, Bishop of Loretto. Also present 
for the festivities was Most Rev. Fr. 
Albert of the Sorrowful Virgin, C.P., 
General of the Congregation. 



North Italy 

Reverend Father Cornelius, C.P., 
of the Province of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary, already known for 
his "The Great Return," has recently 
brought out, for the use of our Pas- 
sionist Missionaries, a two volume 
work that will prove very useful 
both for mission sermons and other 
particularized preaching. The two 
volumes are filled with interesting, 
practical and original examples, a 
mine of good sermon material. The 
books may be obtained from P. Cor- 
nelio Passionista, Arcellasco (Como), 
Italy. Price 1000 lire. 

Another member of the Immacu- 
late Heart, Fr. Ladislaus of Mary 
Immaculate, C.P., has produced what 
should prove to be a very interesting 
book. It is entitled "De Vocatione 
Religiosa," and sub-titled "Tractatus 
historico-iuridico-moralis." Because 
of his excellent work, Fr. Ladislaus 
was chosen, during the recent "Con- 
gress on the States of Perfection" at 
Rome, to write a paper on the sub- 
ject of religious vocations, one of 
the themes taken up during the 
Congress. 



Rev. Father David, C.P., of the Addolorata 
Province. 



South Italy 

Rev. Fr. Generoso, C.P., of the 
Province of the Side of Jesus, has 
recently written a book that received 
a very favorable review in the "L'Os- 
servatore Romano." It is a book 



5& 



about a very recent mystic, Lucia 
Mangano, who died as recently as 
1946. The title: "Lucia Mangano, 
Ursuline." 

Lucia Mangano, so the L'Osserva- 
tore Romano describes her, was a 
woman who "by a life of virtue and 
the power of love achieved an as- 
tounding and overaweing experience 
of God." Externally, her life was 
commonplace, extraordinarily com- 
monplace. Born a farmer's daugh- 
ter in a distant Sicilian village, she 
had very little schooling and dis- 
tinguished herself only by her love 
of prayer, and later, by her interest 
in forming a local Marian organiza- 
tion. Her vocation to the religious 
life came quickly and clearly, and 
she realized it by founding a convent 
of the Ursulines there. Later she 
was to become the substitute su- 
perioress. 

Nevertheless, all along there was 
a very deep interior life at work in 
her soul. She went through all the 
grades of the mystical life, the L'Os- 
servatore Romano remarks, and this 
in an unusual manner. Ordinarily, 
clear distinctions along the path of 
the Three Ways are almost impossi- 
ble to see, so closely do the various 
degrees blend together. However, 
the opposite seems true in the case 
of Lucia Mangano. It would almost 
seem that the mystical theology has 
come to life, and gone through one 
degree of perfection after the oth- 
er. "The characteristic of Lucia Man- 
gano, from the time of her birth to 
her 37th year, is a clear and complete 
mystical life according to the pure 
tradition of the teaching of St. 
Teresa and St. John of the Cross." 
It is "at the same time, an external 



religious life that is simple and or- 
dinary, easily imitated and accessi- 
ble to all." She received the highest 
of mystical graces, the Mystical 
Marriage, March 24, 1933. 

Fr. Generoso's book is a detailed 
reconstruction of her life from her 
own diary (written under obedience), 
the testimony of her spiritual direc- 
tor and her companions who were 
with her at her death. She had a 
very special devotion towards Jesus 
Crucified and His Sorrowful Mother. 
The prayer leaflet that seeks to 
make her more widely known carries 
her own beautiful prayer to the 
Sorrowful Virgin. (Ed. L'Addolora- 
ta, PP. Passionisti, Mascalucia Cata- 
nia, Sicily) 



France 

The new Preparatory Seminary, of 
the Province of St. Michael, that The 
Passionist, . January 1949, reported 
as having been re-located at Lon- 
geron, in the Vendee, recently found 
some fame, after it was featured in 
the Ouest-France, a western French 
daily. 

"Reverend Father Pol is the su- 
perior of this community . . . indeed 
a young superior, full of energy, 
(though it is an energy tempered by 
a boundless depth of kindness) and 
dynamic force in the face of difficult 
undertakings. Surely it is a difficult 
undertaking to found a preparatory 
school here. 

"A preparatory school . . . Twenty 
young boys, scarcely more than chil- 
dren, have come here to seek for a 
peaceful asylum for prayer and 
study. It is fitting that one with a 
soul and heart so young should have 



59 



been given charge of this generous 
group of boys." 

"The Preparatory Seminary was 
begun in October, 1948, when five 
young professors left the Retreat of 
the Passionist Fathers at Melay to 
prepare the necessary classrooms, 
study rooms, chapel, dormitories, 
etc., in this ancient lordly chateau. 

"At present, there are but four 
classes, ranging from the 6th to the 
3rd. (The French count their six 
years of Preparatory Seminary in 
reverse, from the 6th to the 1st, cul- 
minating in the Baccalaureate, or 
B.A. — Ed.) But the intention is to 
extend the course of instruction to 
prepare the students for the B.A 

"The Passionists have named 
their new house "Our Lady of Holy 
Hope." "It is a large house, and yet 
(just two years after our arrival), it 
is already too small," smiled Father 
Pol. Construction will begin on a 



new wing this spring, to contain 
more classrooms and dormitories . . ." 




Very Rev. Fr. Inocencio, Provincial, bless- 
ing the cornerstone of the new Prepara- 
tory Seminary. 



Spain 

On October 22, 1950, the Provincial 
of the Province of the Holy Family, 
Very Rev. Fr. Inocencio, C.P., blessed 
the cornerstone of the new Seminary 
which the Province is building in the 
town of Zuera, a suburb of Saragoza. 
The new seminary, which will be 
named after St. Gabriel as is the 
present one, will have room for 200 
students, double that of the present 
structure. 

Other news of the Province relates 
to Mexico. Word has come back to 
the Province that some of the Fa- 
thers are not permitted to go about 
the apostolate. Some of them have 
orders from the government to leave 
the country, their crime being the 
exercise of their sacerdotal ministry. 
At this time things are still unsettled. 
Some of the Fathers who left Spain 
several months ago have not been 
able to enter Mexico, and are at 
present in Cuba awaiting the day 
that will see them obtain the re- 
quired and much-desired permission. 

At Saragosa, on December 10, nine 
Students and two lay Brothers made 
their Perpetual Profession, an occa- 
sion that always brings joy to a 
growing province. 

During the Holy Year, the Pro- 
vince of the Holy Family celebrated 
the Golden Jubilee of one of its older 
houses. The Retreat of Our Lady of 
Villar was established in 1900, at 
Corella, Spain. At present it serves 
as the Novitiate for the Holy Family 
Province. Holy Family Province, in- 
cidentally, enjoys the distinction of 



GO 



being one of our most "cosmopolitan" 
provinces, with houses in Spain, 
Mexico, Cuba and Venezuela. 



Holland 

The Province of Our Lady of Holy 
Hope celebrated the Golden Jubilee 
of two of its members, one of Ordi- 
nation, the other of Profession. 

Fr. Clement Fleischeuer, C.P., cele- 
brated the 50th anniversary of his 
Ordination to the Holy Priesthood. 
Fr. Clement was one of the pioneers 
of the province, and the founder of 
the Retreat of the Sorrowful Mother, 
in Mook. Many of those fifty years 
were spent as Superior, whether 
Rector, Provincial or Consultor. We 
add our own "ad multos annos" to 
the grateful words of the Editors of 
the Dutch Passionist Review "Gol- 



gotha": "What the Dutch Province 
owes to Father Clement could never 
be put down in a few lines!" 

On the same day, November 18, 
but in the Monastery at Echt, Fr. 
Eleutherius Simons, C.P. celebrated 
the Golden Jubilee of his religious 
profession. Fr. Eleutherius has like- 
wise filled the office of Rector several 
times, and now acts as Pastor of the 
parish church of Maria-Hoop (Dutch 
for Mater Sanctae Spei) at Echt. 

Congratulations and best wishes 
to both Jubilarians. 



Argentina 

From the Immaculate Conception 
Province, we have received the first 
two issues of the new monthly re- 
view "Santa Cruz." We have been 
receiving the "Santa Cruz" for sev- 




'icture of the five I'assionist Sister novices, at Tielt, Belgium, 
in Kruis en Liefde, Dutch I'assionist magazine. 



I'll is picture appeared 



61 



eral years, when it was doubling as 
a parish bulletin, at the Passionist 
church of Santa Cruz in Buenos 
Aires. We always felt that some- 
thing like this would come from the 
old "Santa Cruz," and we were not 
mistaken. 

The new review is a thirty-two 
page magazine, in size slightly larger 
than The Passionist. The Santa 
Cruz "seeks to be a continuation of 
Passionist preaching; it seeks to ex- 
tend it, diffuse it, to complement it 
. . . Its pages aspire to speak to Chris- 
tians of the themes which interest 
them, of the truths which pertain to 
them, speaking to them in Passion- 
ist language . . ." 



1 




The new Santa Cruz has begun 
very auspiciously. Its format and 
arrangement (three colors)) assure 
it an interested audience. Its offices 
of administration and correspond- 
ence are at Estados Unidos 3150, 
Buenos Aires, Argentina. Congratu- 
lations to the Editors. 



Immaculate Conception Province 
was saddened by the death of its 
oldest member, Rev. Fr. Louis Hoch- 
endoner, C.P., who was also the 
dean of the whole Congregation. 
National Catholic newspapers in the 
U.S. carried the news of the death 
of the 94 year old Passionist, who 
was born in the United States in 
1856. He was professed in 1873 and 
ordained in 1880. R. I. P. 



Rev. Fr. Louis Hochendoner, C. P. 



"A Golden Landmark for the Irish 
Community in this country, and per- 
haps the greatest in the history of 
those whose forefathers settled in 
the Carmen de Areco and Arrecifes 
district — the Golden Jubilee of the 
foundation of St. Paul's College 
at Capitan Sarmiento, was celebrat- 
ed November 11." Thus does the 
Buenos Aires Herald report the cele- 
bration of the Fiftieth Anniversary 
of the founding of the Passionist Col- 
lege in Capitan Sarmiento, a sub- 
urb of Buenos Aires. 

Two of the distinguished honorary 
presidents of the school were pres- 
ent, namely Msgr. Charles Fr. Han- 
Ion, C.P., Bishop of Catamarca, the 
first member of the Irish community 
to hold a Bishopric in Argentina, and 
Very Rev. Ambrose Geoghegan, C.P., 
the Provincial of the Passionists. 
The remaining honorary president, 
Very Rev. Albert Deane, C.P., Gen- 



62 



eral of the Passionists, sent a letter 
of congratulation for the occasion. 

St. Paul's College was founded in 
1900, as a day school, by Fr. John 
Mary Macklin, C.P., the fame of 
whose sanctity is rapidly spreading, 
and was later turned into a boarding 
school by Rev. Fr. William, C.P. 

Another Golden Jubilee is that of 
Rev. Fr. Dominic, C.P., former Pro- 
vincial of Immaculate Conception 
Province, who this past year cele- 
brated the Fiftieth Anniversary of 
his Priesthood. Fr. Dominic was 
the first Argentine Passionist to be 
ordained. 

Devotion to St. Mary Goretti has 
taken a great hold of both Clergy 
and laity in Buenos Aires, and the 
whole Argentine. A new parish in 
Buenos Aires probably has the dis- 
tinction of being the first church 
named after her. "Sangre de Nues- 
tro Siglo" by Rev. Fr. Mark, C.P., 
has done a great deal toward mak- 
ing the devotion to Mary Goretti 
what it has become. 



Australia 

This unusual year, as far as the 
weather is concerned, is reflected in 
reports from the Holy Spirit Pro- 
vince, in Australia. Winter weather 
here means very hot and steamy 
weather in the "land down under." 
For instance, Sydney has a semi-tro- 
pical climate and the temperature 
hovers in the neighbourhood of the 
100's, or higher. The same goes for 
Melbourne and Adelaide. The whole 
eastern side of Australia has had 
an abnormally wet season this year. 
Sydney, for example, with an aver- 




[jm\ ysifiy \ifi! y \ 







sb m 



*m !M 



p *i 




The n«'\\ italned glnsi window la tin* 

Church of I'r/asnys/., Poland, depleting the 

Last Judgment. 



63 



isy-"** 




The Novitiate Chapel at the Retreat of SS. James and Anna, Przasnysz, Poland. Right 
the thirteen clerical novices vested last September. 



age yearly rainfall of 46 inches, had 
over 90 inches during 1950. Tully, 
in North Queensland, has had no 
fewer than 288 inches of rainfall 
during 1950, an all time record for 
Australia. Naturally, the rains have 
caused sever flooding throughout the 
coastal and inland territories. 

The students at the Preparatory 
Seminary began their "summer" va- 
cation December 12, and reported 
back for classes January 30. Four of 
the Professed Students, in Adelaide, 
received Minor Orders December 21. 

Reports from Holy Spirit Province 
indicate that the Missions have been 
very heavy, and very abundantly 
blessed. An even heavier schedule 
is in store for this year. 

The Maria Goretti Centre, at the 
Province Juniorate, has been con- 
stantly sending out booklets, pic- 
tures, plaques, holy cards and med- 
als to all parts of Australia. The 



demand has been very surprising. 
Maria Goretti has captured the 
hearts of many thousand Australian 
girls. 



Poland 

We were happy to receive, from 
Fr. Michael, C.P., of the Vice-Pro- 
vince of Poland, a picture of the 
beautiful new stained glass window 
that now decorates the Passionist 
Church at Przasnysz, through the 
enthusiastic cooperation of the peo- 
ple of Przasnysz and the surround- 
ing neighbourhood. (Cf. The Pas- 
sionist, Dec, 1950) 

The Vice-Province continues to 
grow slowly, even though under the 
most adverse conditions. There are 
thirteen novices, and during Novem- 
ber two Brothers, Stanislaus and 
Thadeus, made their perpetual pro- 
fession. 



64 




The Holy See has approved a new 
Mass in honor of the Assumption 
of the Blessed Virgin Mary. The 
same decree, which appears in the 
Acta Apostolica Sedis, for Novem- 
ber 4, 1950, also enjoins that in the 
Litany of Loretto the invocation 
"Regina in caelum assumpta" be 
added immediately following the in- 
vocation "Regina sine labe originali 
concepta." 



The Passionist acknowledges the 
receipt of the Ordo Congregationis 
Passionis 1951, from Rome. It is 
excellently done. As an appendix, it 
gives the few lines which the Sacred 
Congregation of Rites has decreed 
shall be added to the sixth lesson 
for the feast of St. Vincent Mary 
Strambi. They are the following: 
". . . novis deinde fulgentem signis 
Pius Papa duodecimus Anno Sacro 
subsequenti in Sanctorum numerum 
retulit." 



A limited number of copies of 
"The First Catholic Mission to the 
Australian Aborigines," by Rev. Fr. 
Osmund Thorpe, C.P., of the Pro- 
vince of the Holy Spirit, is on hand, 
and may be obtained from The Pas- 
sionist. The price is $3.00 postpaid. 
The book is a frank, revealing and 
very interesting account of the caus- 



na 




es that led to the first mission to 
the Australian "blacks" and, eventu- 
ally, to its failure. Documentation 
in the book is superbly done, and has 
received well-merited praise. 



From New Delhi, India, comes 
word in the Press, that orders have 
gone out to accord Archbishop Leo 
P. Kierkels, C.P., Apostolic Inter- 
nuncio to India, full honors befitting 
a diplomatic representative on a 
recent trip to South India. The Arch- 
bishop presided at Ernakulam at the 
closing of the Malabar Marian Con- 
gress. 



The Sign, for January 1951, carries 
an excellent article by Rev. Fr. Al- 
fred MacConastair, C.P., of the Pro- 
vince of the Immaculate Conception, 
Argentina. Entitled "Convict Num- 
ber 3142," the article is an account 
of the "man who killed Maria Goret- 
ti . . . . It is a story of socially based 
delinquency, crime, prison, and a 
repentance won for him by his saint- 
ly victim." Fr. Alfred, who is known 
to so many of the Fathers in this 
Province, has done another good job. 
After listening to Father Alfred, be- 
fore his return to Argentina, we are 
convinced that if anyone knows the 
story of St. Mary Goretti, and the 
man who murdered her. it is he. We 



65 



are looking forward to his "Lily of 
the Marshes," which will be published 
this spring by Macmillan Co. 



The American Ordo for 1951 was 
a bit early this year, consequently 
there were a few changes in addres- 
es and phone numbers missed. We 
tried to make up for the changes by 
printing a gummed insert giving all 



the new numbers. (We have a lim- 
ited number of these left. You may 
have one if you write: The Ordo, 
1924 Newburg Road, Louisville 5, 
Kentucky) However, even so we 
missed one. The new phone number 
at the Immaculate Conception Mon- 
astery, Jamaica, N.Y., is REpublic 
9-2525 (instead of RE.9-9791). Fr. 
Rector's phone remans the same, 
REPUBLIC 9-7988. 



We must attain perfection not in our own manner but as it pleases the Lord. 
{Letters, I, 691) Merit and perfection consist in carrying the cross that God 
wills and not that which we desire. (Ill, 218) 

To become holy you need an N and an A. You are the N because you are a 
horrible nothingness; the A is God, because He is the infinite All. Therefore 
let the N of your nothingness disappear in the infinite All that is the Great 
God. 

{Letters, HI, 747) 



THE PASSIONIST 

extencU Sympathy ta 



Rev. Fr. Clyde (Zarski), C.P., on the death of his Mother. 
Rev. Fr. Quentin (Reneau) C.P., on the death of his 

Father. 



66 



Health, Our Holy Founder 
and Passionist Diet 

Continued from page 18) 

tein-rich foods during a large part 
of the year. Yet many of these re- 
ligious are constantly engaged in 
extra hard work with seemingly 
no adverse effect to their health. 

Body Regulators 

The elements that are called reg- 
ulators for the body are mineral 
salts, vitamins, fiber, and water. 
Of the ten mineral salts that are 
important in nutrition there are 
four that receive special emphasis; 
— calcium, phosphorous, iron, and 
iodine. Among the vitamins that 
are particularly stressed are the 
following; — vitamin A, thiamin, 
riboflavin, niacin, ascorbic acid, and 
vitamins D, E, and K. The import- 
ance of water and fiber is known 
to most everyone. The latter being 
essential to good intestinal hy- 
giene. 

Modern nutrition with its invalu- 
able contributions to mankind has 
stemmed from the dramatic dis- 
coveries associated with vitamins. 
When the importance of vitamins 
and of mineral salts in the diet was 
scientifically established, there was 
concerted effort to educate people 
away from the meat, bread, and 
potato diet. Then came the advent 
of a class of foods heretofore neg- 
lected ; these were heralded as "pro- 
tective" foods, because they would 
balance an otherwise one-sided diet. 



It is surprising and gratifying to 
see that without any conscious ef- 
fort on our part these "protective" 
foods have been amply supplied by 
our diet. Included in this group of 
foods are all kinds of vegetables, 
fruits, milk and whole grains. We 
have been particularly fortunate 
in having such an abundance of 
fresh vegetable salads and fresh 
fruit. Until very recently these two 
items were not a common sight on 
the American table. Their pres- 
ence in our diet can be traced no 
doubt to the Italian's preference for 
these very foodstuffs. As regards 
whole-grains, it must be said that 
they have not been popular to date, 
but in most monasteries whole- 
wheat bread is accessible. 

Have we benefited as we should 
from the nutritional advantages put 
before us? In many cases the an- 
swer is;— "not as much as we 
should have." This is where that 
instinct factor, referred to in a 
previous article, can be called to a 
severe account. The common in- 
stinct is to eat more liberally of 
carbohydrates, proteins, and fats 
and to neglect the lighter foods. 
Some refer to salads and leafy veg- 
etables as "rabbit" food; and some 
say that milk is only for babies. 
Nevertheless, it is a wise dietary 
practice to give these foods a pro- 
minent place in one's eating habits. 

Properly Prepared Foods 

If there is one factor upon which 
the realization of requisite nourish- 



67 



ment depends it is "properly pre- 
pared" foods. The term "properly 
prepared" has a greater depth of 
meaning in modern nutrition than 
was formerly attached to it. Pre- 
viously it meant mainly taste and 
appearance; today it means con- 
serving the nutritive value of the 
food. This is accomplished by ad- 
hering to correct methods of handl- 
ing and cooking procedure. No 
matter how wise the choice of foods 
may be, requisite nourishment can- 
not be attained without the correct 
preparation of these same foods. 
This particularly applies to vegeta- 
bles because their delicate composi- 
tion is readily affected by improper 
handling and cooking. 

Until comparatively recently, in- 



stitutional food service has not giv- 
en the attention to vegetable pre- 
paration that good nutrition re- 
quires. This too has been our ma- 
jor deficiency. We have not been 
utilizing as much of the nutritive 
value contained in vegetables as 
we should. Much improvement 
needs to be made along this line 
before we can say that we are de- 
riving the maximum nourishment 
from the foods we use. Possible 
corrective measures will be sug- 
gested later when treating of those 
in charge of the meal service. 

Conclusion 

In summing up this analysis' of 
the Passionist diet it bears repeti- 
tion what was said at the outset 



Comparative Caloric Content Of Certain Foods 



FOOD 


AVERAGE PORTION 


CALORIC CONTENT 


Bread 


2 slices 


130 


Potatoes 


Vi cup 


101 


Soda Crackers 


4 


104 


Cookies 


1-2 


106 


Cake-iced 


Average 


202 


Apple Pie 


Average 


346 


Ice Cream 


Average 


214 


Puddings 


4 oz. 


175 


Candy Bar 


Average 


287 


Soda Pop 


8 oz. 


70 


Peanuts 


16 


83 


Butter 


1 oz. 


266 


Stewed Prunes 


5-6 


125 


Baked Beans 


Vi cup 


no 


Sugar 


2 Teaspoons 


32 


Mayonnaise 


1 oz. 


235 


Olive Oil 


1 Tablespoon 


100 



68 



namely: — that our food standards 
at the present time conform, in 
many respects, to the principles of 
good nutrition. In many respects 
our Holy Founder, were he living 
today, would be pleased with the 
way his religious were being nour- 
ished. On the other hand, it seems 



certain that he would not be fully 
satisfied. We know that he insisted 
on the proper preparation of foods. 
In view of what that term means in 
modern nutrition, there is no doubt 
that he would insist that those in 
charge use every modern means to 
attain that end. 




TREE SHELTER 

Oh beauty shelter of the tree 

In thy arms Christ embraces thee. 

Leafy citadel of world storm 

Boughs lift from life its harm. 

Oh beauty shelter of the tree 

Healing sin of soul in thee. 

Beacon light in world alarm 

Christ on cross has ever charm. 

Oh beauty shelter of the tree 

Though world tempests rage about thee 

Serene thy safety in thy arm 

Lifting to where God frees from harm. 

Oh beauty shelter of the tree 

God blessed and reposed on thee. 

Pledge of life is in thy form 

Death bed of God is in thy arm. 

Fr. Austin, C.P. 




69 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The following enumeration does not pretend to be complete. It contains only those works, 
from September to March inclusive which have come to our notice.) 



SEPT. 



OCT. 







MISSIONS 




3-10 


Bayard, Neb. 


Sacred Heart 


Emmanuel 




Maple River, Iowa, 


St. Francis 


Arnold 




Apalachicola, Fla. 


Holy Trinity 


Cornelius 




Crawfordsville, Ark. 


St. Michael mission 


Brendan 




Russellvile.Ky. 


Sacred Heart 


Mark 


10-17 


Galloway, Wise. 


St. Joseph 


Hilary 


10-24 


Brinkley, Ark. 


St. John Baptist 


Henry 




Forest City, Ark. 


St. Francis 


Flannon 




Bigelow, Ark. 


St. Boniface 


Wilfrid 


17-24 


Marysburg, Minn. 


Immac Concept 


Terence 




Troy, Ind. 


St. Pius 


Pascal 




Fairfield, Ala. 


St. Mary 


Cornelius 




Lenox, Iowa 


St. Patrick 


Ronan 




Abingdom, 111. 


All Souls 


Canute 




Holy Cross, Iowa 


Holy Cross 


Alban 




Whiting, Ind. 


Immac Concept 


John Aelred 


17-1 


Brookville, Ind. 


St. Michael 


Emmanuel, Keith 




Akron, Ohio 


St. Sebastian 


Justin, Leo Patrick 


24-8 


Chicago, 111. 


Maternity 


George, Kilian 




Chicago, 111. 


Immac Concept 


Lambert, Bartholomew 


24-1 


New Blaine, Ark. 


St. Scholastica 


Daniel 




Hamburg, Iowa 


St. Mary 


Theophane 


1-8 


Irish Settlement, Iowa St. Patrick 


Matthias 




St. Peter, Kans. 


St. Anthony 


Roland 




Harlan, Ky. 


Mission Center 


Cornelius 




Gadsden, Ala. 


St. James 


Ralph 




Scranton, Ark. 


St. Ignatius 


Daniel 




Columbus, Kans. 


St. Rose 


Henry 




Alliance, Nebr. 


Holy Rosary 


Alban, Boniface 


1-15 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Dorothy 


Timothy, Hilary 




St. Paul. Minn. 


St. Michael 


Terence, Pascal 




Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Bl. Sacrament 


Roman, Walter 




Washington, Ind. 


St. Simon 


Edwin, Wilfrid 




Halletsville, Texas 


St. Mary 


John Aelred 




Portland, Ind. 


Immac Concept 


Flannon 


8-15 


. Vincennes, Ind. 


St. John Baptist 


Emmanuel, Jordan 




Prairie View, Ark. 


St. Meinrad 


Daniel 




McCracken, Kans. 


St. Mary 


Robert 




Junita, Neb. 


Assumption 


Canute 


8-22 


Byersville, Ohio 


Holy Trinity 


Cyril Mary 




St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Rose 


Stanislaus, Leo Patrick 


15-22 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. William 


George 




Seaview, Wash. 


St. Mary 


DUnstan 




Kankakee, 111. 


Immac Concept 


Cornelius 




Ratcliff, Ark. 


St. Anthony 


Bertrand 




Fairflax, Iowa 




Alban 




Oswego, Kans. 


Mother of God 


Brendan 


15-29 


Marburg, Ala. 


Holy Ghost 


Godfrey 




Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Leo 


Valentine, Roland 



70, 



22-29 St. Mary of the 
Woods, Ind. 

Peoria, Ariz. 

Catdott, Wise. 

Casco, Wise. 

Walnut, Kans. 

Starlight, Ind. 

Boston, Texas 

Rapid City. N.D. 

Needville, Texas 

New Riegel, Ohio 

Barnesville, Ohio 
8-22 Bloomington, 111. 
22-29 Morrison Bluff, Ark. 
22-5 Berkley, Mo. 

Clarkesville, Ark. 
29-5 Cedar Grove, Ind. 

El Mirage, Calif. 

Silver Lake, Minn. 

Jamestown, Mo. 

Boonville, Ind. 

Fort Worth, Texas 

Keokuk, Iowa 

Amherst, Wise. 
5-12 Creston, Iowa 

Glendale, Ariz. 

Tennyson, Wise. 

Baldwin Park, Calif. 

Bodoc, La. 

Westwood, Calif. 

Anamosa, Iowa 
5-19 Owossa, Mich. 

Detroit, Mich. 

Edwardsville, 111. 
5-26 Chicago, 111. 

12-19 Litchfield, Minn. 

Tucson, Ariz. 

Leavenworth, Minn. 

Center Ridge, Ark. 

Westphalia, Texas 

Birmingham, Ala. 

Birmingham, Ala. 
12-26 Youngstown. Ohio 
18-22 Brookings. Ore 
19-26 St. Donatus, Iowa 

Highlands, Texas 
19-3 Birmingham, Ala. 

New Orleans, La. 
26-3 Winters, Calif. 

Lebanon, Mo. 
30-8 Chicago, 111. 
3-9 Winters. Calif. 
3-10 Tipton. Calif. 

Nrwliall, Calif. 

Conway, Mo. 



St. Mary of Woods 

St. Charles Bar. 

St. Rose of Lima 

Holy Trinity 

St. Patrick 

St. John 

Air Base 

Air Base 

St. Michael 

St. Boniface 

Assumption 

Holy Trinity 

St. Peter and Paul 

Holy Ghost 

Holy Redeemer 

Guardian Angel 

(Public Hall) 

St. Joseph 

Assumption 

St. Raphael-Mission 

Air Base 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

Immac Concept 

Lady of Perpetual Help 

St. Andrew 

St. John 

Immac Concept 

Our Lady of Snows 

St. Patrick 

St. Paul 

St. Ignatius 

St. Boniface 

St. Mel 

St. Philip 
St. Augustine 
Ch. of Jap. M. 
St. Joseph 
Visitation 
St. Stanislaus 
Bl. Sacrament 
St. Matthias 
Star of the Sea 
St. Donatus 
St. Jude 
St. Barnabas 
St. Monica 
St. Anthony 

St. Francis de Sales 

St. Josaphats 

St. Anthony (Span.) 

St. John 

Sacred Heart 

Sacred Heart 



Emmanuel 

Edward 

Alban 

Matthias 

Robert 

Lambert 

Julius 

Bartholomew 

John Aelred 

Arnold, Rene 

Cyril Mary 

Justin, Theophane 

Bertrand 

Walter 

Wilfrid 

Valentine 

Edward 

Terence 

Mark 

Keith 

Julius 

Boniface 

Hilary 

Emmanuel 

Edward 

Alban 

Martin 

Cornelius 

Dunstan 

Timothy 

Justin, Nilus 

Theophane 

Robert, Bartholomew 

Roland, Lambert 

Flannon, Leo Patrick 

Pascal 

Edward, Jerome 

Fidelis 

Wilfrid 

John Aelred 

Gregory 

Ralph 

Cyril Mary 

Dunstan 

Alban 

Emmanuel 

Terence 

Cornelius 

Edward 

Pascal 

Hilary 

Edward 

Martin 

Aldan 

Pascal 



71 



JAN. 



FEB. 



3-17 



10-17 



14-21 

14-28 

21-28 

28-4 

4-18 

11-18 



11-25 



MAR. 



18-25 



25-1 
25-4 



25-11 



25-18 



4-11 



Springfield, Minn. 
; Carlisle, Ark. 
Lemont, 111. 
Trussville, Ala. 
Eagle Lake, Texas 
Owosso, Mich. 
Sandusky, Ohio 
Liberty, Texas 
Cambridge, Ohio 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Darwin, Minn. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Galena, Texas 
Shakopee, Minn. 
Bedford, Ind. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Hillside, HI. 
Siberia, Ind. 
Dallas, Texas 
Pratt, Kans. 
New Orleans, La. 
Monroe, Mich. 
Westphalia, Kans. 
Morgen, Minn. 
Morrow, La. 
Akron, Ohio 
Wentzville, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 

St. Louis, Mo. 
Cleveland, Ohio 

Slmwood Park, 111. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Toledo, Ohio 
Rockwood, Mich. 
Destrehan, La. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Leopold, Ind. 
New Orleans, La. 
Maxwell, Ala. 
Lott, Texas 
Kellq, Kans. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Kingman, Kans. 
Chicago, 111. 
Jefferson, Iowa 
Lancaster, Ohio 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Flint, Mich. 
Rock Island, Iowa 
Wayne, Mich. 
Peoria Heights, 111. 
Grandville, 111. 
Joliet, 111. 



St. Raphael 


Fidelis, Keith 




Wilfrid 


St. Patrick 


Alban 


Infant of Prague 


Gregory 


Lady of Perpetual Help 


John Aelred 


St. Joseph 


Cyril Mary 


Holy Angels 


Timothy 


Immac Concept 


Emmanuel 


St. Benedict 


Valentine, Nilus 


Quadalupe 


Edward 


St. Paul 


Pascal 


Queen of Peace 


Edwin, George 


St. Augustine 


Terence 


Lady of Fatima 


Emmanuel 


St. Mary's 


Terence 


St. Vincent de Paul 


Valentine Nilus 


Assumption 


George 


St. Domitilla 


Cornelius 


St. Martin 


Pascal 


Our Lady of P. Help 


Bertrand 


Sacred Heart 


Stanislaus 


St. Paul 


Kilian 


St. Michael 


Roland, Flannon 


St. Theresa 


Walter 


St. Michael 


Fidelis 


St. Peter 


Finan 


St. Peter 


Julius 


St. Patrick 


Lambert, Arnold 


Queen of Angels 


Bartholomew, 




Robert 


Ascension 


Boniface, Ronan 


St. Rose 


Justin, Matthias, 




Leo Patrick 


St. Celestine 


Alban, Daniel 


St. Liborious 


Gilbert, Edwin 


St. Ann 


Mark, Wilfrid 


St. Mary's 


Timothy, Regis 


St. Charles B. 


Marion, Rene 


Our Lady of Sorrows 


Canute 


St. Augustine 


Pascal 




Kilian 


Air Force Base 


Cornelius 


Sacred Heart 


Bertrand 


St. Bede 


George 


Holy Rosary 


Terence 


St. Patrick 


StanislausNilus 


Notre Dame 




St. Joseph 


Hilary 


St. Mary's 


Emmanuel, Clarence 


St. Mark 


Roland, Theophane 


St. Mary's 


Valentine, Keith 


Sacred Heart 


Walter, Flannon 


St. Mary's 


Lambert, Eustace 


St. Thomas 


Ronan 


Mission Church 


Kilian 


St. Joseph 


Camillus, Timothy 



72 



4-18 



11-18 



18-25 



SEPT. 1-8 

2-4 

11-14 

20-29 

24-3 

16-22 

21-28 
20-24 
21-24 

27-29 



1-10 
3-6 

10-17 

17-21 

17-20 

18-22 

19-23 

25-29 

1-6 

3-5 

2-8 



Echo, La. 


St. Francis 


Cornelius 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Francis Cabrini 


Gilbert 


Wanda, Minn. 


St. Matthias 


Mark 


Destrehan, La. 


St. Charles B. 


Marion, Rene 


Faribault, Minn. 


St. Lawrence 


Pascal, Godfrey 


Sioux City, Iowa 


St. Jean Baptiste 


Alban 


Houghton, Mich. 


St. Ignatius 


Daniel, Regis 


St. Paul, Minn. 


St. Francis de S. 


Pius, Robert 


Henderson, Ky. 


Holy Name 


Bartholomew, Finan 


Quincy, 111. 


St. John 


Matthias, Jordan 


Barberton, Ohio 


St. Augustine 


Justin, Leo Patrick 


Winnipeg, Canada 


Cathedral 


Edwin, Canute 


Covington, Xy. 


St. Benedict 


Arnold, Fidelis 


Port Arthur, T. 


Our Lady of Guadalupe 


Wilfrid 


Streator, 111. 


Immac Concept 


Boniface, Miles 


Rosenberg, T. 


Holy Rosary 


John Aelred 


Adrian, Mich. 


St. Mary's 


Hilary 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Callistus 


Timothy 


La Salle, 111. 


Holy Rosary 


Kilian 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Donatus 


Terence 


Egg Bend, La. 


Our Lady of Lourdes 


Cornelius 


Palestine, T. 


Sacred H/-art 


Stanislaus 


Edwardsville. 111. 


St. Mary's 


Bertrand 


Kinde, Mich. 


St. Edward's 


Nilus 


Mobile, Ala. 


St. Monica 


Ralph 


Ponca City, Okla. 


St. Mary's 


George, Cormac 


Dayton, Ohio 


Air Force Base 


Ronan 


Winnipeg, Canada 


Our Lady of Victory 
RETREATS 


Canute 


Kearney, Neb. 


Corpus Xti Carmel 


Louis 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Bl. Sacrament Fathers 


Matthias 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Prep. Seminary Boys 


Kevin 


Gary, Ind. 


St. Mary's Hosp.(N) 


Cyril Mary 


St. Louis. Mo. 


Sisters of St. Mary 


Valentine 


Kansas City, Kans. 


St. Augustine Seminary 


Bernard 


Cleveland, Ohio 


Our Lady of Lake 






Seminary 


Edwin 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Clare Convent 


Kevin 


Hot Springs, Ark. 


St. Joseph Hospital (N) 


Anthony 


Oxley, Canada 


Holy Family Retreat 






House 


Boniface 


La Crosse. Wise. 


Aquinas High School 


Godfrey, Matthew 
Jordan 


Sacramento. Calif. 


Christ the King( Clergy) 


Philip 


San Pierre, Ind. 


Little Company of Mary 


Elmer 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Bernard Hospital (N) 


Emmanuel 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Clare Convent 


Kevin 


Evansville, Ind. 


Litle Sisters (O.F.) 


Alfred 


Evanston. 111. 


St. George High 


Kenneth. Regis 


Chicago. 111. 


Litle Sisters (O.F.) 


Kevin 


Fort Smith. Ark. 


St. Edward Hospital (N) 


Anthony 


Chicago. 111. 


Litle Sisters (O.F.) 


Hilary 


Kalamazoo. Mich. 


Nazareth Academy (S) 


Regis 


Bralnerd, Minn. 


St. Francis Parish 


Godfrey 


Caldwell. Ohio 


O.L. of Charity Sisters 


Cyril M 



73 



DEC. 



12-19 Los Angeles, Calif. 
12-21 Wickliffe, Ohio 

Grand Rapids, Mich. 
14-21 Normandy, Mo. 
17-19 Alhambra, Calif. 
17-21 Owensboro, Ky. 
Erlanger, Ky. 
Kirkwood, Mo. 
19-26 Cincinnati, Ohio 
20-22 Detroit, Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Detroit, Mich. 
21-30 Lufkin, Texas 
24-26 Detroit, Mich. 

La Crosse, Wise. 
27-29 Alhambra,; Calif. 
29-8 St. Louis, Mo. 
Chicago, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Toleda, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
Loretto, Ky. 
30-3 Chicago, 111. 
1-8 La Porte, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 
Signal Mt., Tenn. 
1-3 La Crosse, Wise. 
1-5 Evansville, Ind. 
3-6 Cincinnati, Ohio 
4-8 St. Paul, Minn. 
5-7 Alhambra, Calif. 
5-8 Cambridge, Ohio 
Kansas City, Mo. 
8-10 Alhambra, Calif. 
8-12 Galveston, Texas 
10-15 Hunts ville, Utah 
11-15 Alhambra, Calif. 
13-15 Cincinnati, Ohio 
17-21 Lexington, Ky. 
28-30 Atkinson, 111. 
28-31 Oak Park, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 



Janesville, Wise. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
University City, Mo. 
Independence, Kan. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Iowa City, Iowa 



Good Shepherd Nuns 

Marycrest 

Villa Maria 

Good Shepherd Nuns 

Sacred Heart R. House 

Passionist Nuns 

Passionist Nuns 

Passionist Nuns 

Sacred Heart Seminary 

St. Gertrude H.S. 

Incarnate Word (S) 

De La Salle H.S. 

Dominican Nuns 

Mary Reparatrix 

St. Francis (N) 

Sacred Heart R. House 

Little Sisters 

Little Sisters 

Little Sisters 

Little Sisters 

St. Peter's Home 

Little Sisters 

Motherhouse 

St. Mark Parish 

St. Mary Seminary 

Alexian Brothers 

Alexian Brothers 

St. Francis Hosp. (N) 

St. Mary's Hosp. (N) 

St. Francis Hosp. 

Nativity H.S. 

Holy Name Sisters 

St. Benedict H.S. 

Lillis H.S. 

Sacred Heart R. House 

St. Mary's Hosp. (N) 

Trappists 

Carmelite Fathers 

Ursuline Academy (G) 

St. Joseph Hosp. (N) 

St. Anthony H.S. 

St. Catherine Siena 

Little Flower 

Precious Blood 

Mercy High 

St. Ethelreda 

St. Justin M. 

St. Mary of Lake 

St. Joseph 

St. John's Hosp. 

St. Joseph Hosp. 

Mercy High 

Mercy Hospital 

Our Lady of Sorrows 

St. Anthony 

Mercy Hospital 



Philip 

Matthias 

Boniface 

Paulinus 

Ernest 

Egbert 

Bernard 

Kevin 

Edwin 

Timothy 

Godfrey 

Colum 

John Aelred 

Boniface 

Godfrey 

Ernest 

Kevin 

Alexis 

Anthony 

Boniface 

Eustace 

Bernard 

Elmer 

Lambert 

Emmanuel 

Valentine 

Stanislaus 

Kenneth 

Roland 

Alfred 

Matthew 

Gabriel 

Nilus 

Canute 

Joyce 

Bertrand 

Philip 

Gabriel 

Anthony 

Anthony 

Columban 

Emmanuel 

Alban 

Matthias 

Valentine 

Kenneth 

Bernard 

Edwin 

Egbert 

Anthony 

Roland 

Kevin 

Louis 

Gregory 

Terence 

Wilfrid 



74 





Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Mt. St. Mary's 


Bertrand 




Joplin, Mo. 


St. John's Hosp. 


Joseph 




Joplin, Mo. 


St. Peter H.S. 


Paulinus 




Oklahoma City, Okla. 


Mercy Hospital 


Clarence 




Muskegon, Mich. 


Mercy Hospital 


Boniface 




Marshalltown, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Regis 




Bay City, Mich. 


Mercy Hospital 


Timothy 




Des Moines, la. 


Bishop Drumm Home 


Godfrey 






St. Catherine Hall 


Germaines 






Mercy Hospital 


Thomas 




Centerville, la. 


St. Joseph Hosp. 


Ron an 




Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Mt. Mercy Academy 


Alexis 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Catherine Convent 


Mark 




Hutchinson, Kan. 


St. Elizabeth Hosp. 


Pascal 




Council Bluffs, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Kilian 




Waverly, la. 


Mercy Hospital 


Ignatius 




Algona, la. 


St. Ann Hospital 


Finan 




Dayton, Ohio 


St. Elizabeth Hosp. 


Alfred 




Fort Scott, Kan. 


Mercy Hospital 


Robert 




Litle Rock, Ark. 


Mt. St. Mary 


John Aelred 




Fort Smith, Ark. 


St. Ann Academy 


Stanislaus 




Lansing, Mich. 


St. Lawrence Hosp. 


Arnold 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Lady of Lourdes 


Gabriel 


7-12 


Denver, Colo. 


O.F.M. Community 


Stanislaus 


8-10 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Xavier H.S. 


Bartholomew, Flannon 


8-12 


Dayton, Ohio 


Julienne High 


Godfrey 


14-21 


Wichita, Kan. 


Mt. St. Mary 


Valentine 


15-17 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Xavier High 


Lambert, Walter 


17-19 


Saginaw, Mich. 


St. Mary Cathedral High 


Roland 




Galveston, Texas 


Dominican High 


Bertrand 


20-29 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Srs. of St. Mary 


Stanislaus 


21-24 


Cincinnati, Ohio 


Immaculata Commercial 


Lambert 


22-25 


Ensley, Ala. 


Holy Family High 


Canute 


24-26 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Mary of Per. Help 


Godfrey 


24-27 


Lemont, 111. 


Fournier Institute 


Alb an 




Winona, Minn. 


St. Mary College 


Valentine, Bartholomew 


25-8 


Kirkwood, Mo. 


Passionist Nuns 


Matthias 


26-4 


Owensboro, Ky. 


Passionist Nuns 


Paulinus 


29-2 


Norwood, Ohio 


Regina High 


Godfrey 




Wickliffe, Ohio 


Marycrest School 


Anthony 


30-1 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Mary of Redford 


Timothy 




COMMUNITY RETREATS 




7-11 


Birmingham, Ala. 


St. Joseph 


Regis 


6-13 


Sierra Madre, Calif. 


Mater Dolorosa 


Daniel 


14-18 


Ensley, Ala. 


Holy Family 


Regis 


16-23 


Chicago, 111. 


Immac Concept 


William (East) 




Des Moines, Iowa 


St. Gabriel 


Charles (East) 


28-1 


Sacramento, Calif. 


Christ the King 


Aidan 




St. Louis. Mo. 


Community. Boys 


Boniface, Leo Patrick 


21-25 


Houston, Texas 


Holy Name 


Regis 


28-4 


Detroit. Mich. 


St. Paul of the Cross 


William (East) 




Dunkirk. N.Y. 


Holy Cross 


Hilary 




Cincinnati, Ohio 


Holy Cross 


Charles ( Baal » 




Scranton, Pa. 


St. Ann 


Robert 


30-6 


St. Paul, Kan. 


St. Francis 


Daniel 



75 



14-21 Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Baltimore, Md. 

FEB. 5-7 Milwaukee, Wis. 
Chicago, 111. 

5-10 Evanston, 111. 

7-9 Little Rock, Ark. 

9-11 Corpus Christi, T. 

12-14 Aurora, 111. 

17-18 Corpus Christi, T. 

19-21 Indianapolis, Ind. 

19-23 Kansas City, Mo. 

21-25 Kansas City, Mo. 

22-25 St. Louis, Mo. 

26-3 Detroit, Mich. 

28-2 Council Bluffs, la. 

MAR. 2-11 Council Bluffs, la. 

3-12 Des Plaines, 111. 

Webster Grove, Mo. 

4-10 St. Louis, Mo. 

8-17 Normandy, Mo. 

12-14 Mt. St. Joseph, Ohio 

12-17 Chicago, 111. 

16-24 Cleveland, Ohio 

16-25 Omaha, Neb. 

Louisville, Ky. 

16-18 Milwaukee, Wise. 

18-20 Chicago, 111. 

19-22 Birmingham, Ala. 

19-25 Cincinnati, Ohio 

20-24 Winona, Minn. 

28-30 Glendale, Ohio 

28-4 Cincinnati, Ohio 



St. Paul Hilary 

St. Joseph Robert 

Notre Dame High Godfrey 

Alexian Bros. Hosp. Kenneth 

St. Francis Hosp. Howard 

Mount St. Mary's Acad. Anthony 

Cathedral Sodality Clarence 

Madonna High Godfrey 

Cathedral Laywomen Clarence 

St. John Academy Howard 

Bishop Hoban High Godfrey 

Little Srs. of Poor Kevin 

St. John's Hosp. Anthony 
Our Lady of Mercy Acad. Howard 

Mount Loretto Anthony 

Mount Loretto Anthony 

St. Patrick Acad. Elmer 
St. Joseph Mercy Convent Bernard 



De Paul Hosp. 
Incarnate Word 
Mt. St. Joseph 
St. Bernard Hosp. 
Ursuline Academy 
St. Catherine Hosp. 
Cenacle, D of I 
St. Joseph Infirmary 
St. Xavier Academy 
John Carroll High 
Good Sam. Hosp. 
St. Teresa College 
Sisters of Charity 
St. Clare Convent 



Howard 

Kevin 

Valentine 

Emmanuel 

Bernard 

Anthony 

Alexis 

Howard 

Valentine 

Carl 

Charles 

Howard 

Anthony 

Kevin 



NOVENAS 



SEPT. 



OCT. 



NOV. 



DEC. 
FEB. 



MAR. 



24-3 
15-24 
25-3 
2-11 
24-1 
29-8 
30-8 



16-23 
3-11 

5-13 
11-20 
14-25 

8-17 

10-19 
14-22 
16-25 



La Crosse, Wise. 
Cleveland, Ohio 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Sacramento 
Sacramento 
Chicago, 111. 
Chicago, 111. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Chicago, 111. 
Houston, Texas 
Sacramento 
Mobile, Ala. 
Edna, Texas 
Chicago, 111. 
New Orleans, La. 
Toledo, Ohio 
New Orleans, La. 
Summit, 111. 
Howell, Mich. 
New Orleans, La. 



St. Wenseslaus 

Our Lady of Mercy 

Little Flower 

Guadalupe Shrine 

All Hallows 

Holy Spirit 

St. Josaphat 

St. Barnabas 

St. Mary of Redford 

Immac Concept 

Immac Concept 

Carmelites 

Cathedral 

St. Agnes 

St. Catherine of G. 

St. Matthias 

St. Stephen 

St. Patrick 

St. Joseph 

St. Joseph 

Incarnate Word 



Noel 

Cyril Mary 

Nilus 

Edward 

Jerome 

Jerome 

Hilary 

Kilian 

Ralph 

Arnold 

Bertrand 

Dunstan 

Canute 

John Aelred 

Theophane 

Thomas 

Kenneth 

Thomas 

Egbert 

Mark 

Clarence 



70 







FORTY HOURS 




SEPT. 1-3 


St. Mary. Ky. 


St. Charles 


Warren 


10-12 


Greenbush, Kan. 


St. Aloysius 


George 


17-19 


Louisville. Ky. 


St. Augustine 


Alfred 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Vincent de Paul 


Gordian 


24-26 


Rhodelia, Ky. 


St. Theresa 


Warren 




Neodesh, Kan. 


St. Ignatius 


Cormac 




Okolona, Ky. 


St. Rita 


Finan 


OCT. 1-3 


Bay City. Mich. 




Linus 




Anthony. Kan. 


Sacred Heart 


Alvin 




Brown City, Mich. 




Mark 




Carlton, Mich. 


St. Patrick 


Colum 




Redford, Mich. 


St. Mary 


Valentine 




Lanesville, Ind. 


St. Mary 


Warren 




St. Lawrence, Ky. 


St. Lawrence 


Finan 


8-10 


Philpot, Ky. 


St. William 


Finan 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 


Martin 




Ferndale, Mich. 


St. James 


Linus 




Flint, Mich. 


St. Mary 


Valentine 


15-17 


Osgood, Ind. 


St. John Baptist 


Warren 




St. Joseph, Mo. 


St. Francis Xavier 


Alvin 




Rockwood, Mich. 


St. Mary 


Linus 




Omaha, Nebr, 


Bl. Sacrament 


Miles 




Cascade, la. 


St. Martin 


Rene 


20-22 


Oxford, la. 


St. Mary 


Miles 


22-24 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Luke 


Declan 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Kevin 


Martin 




Somerset, Ky. 


St. Mildred 


Warren 




St. Mary's, la. 


Immac Concept 


Jordan 


27-29 


Lovilia, la. 


St. Peter 


Malachy 




Portsmouth, la. 


St. Mary 


Noel 




New Haven, Ky. 


St. Catherine 


Warren 


29-31 


Detroit, Mich. 


Christ the King 


Gerard 




Tampa, Kan. 


Holy Redeemer 


Leopold 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Agnes 


Gordian 




Albia, la. 


St. Mary 


Miles 




Templeton, la. 


Sacred Heart 


Matthew- 


NOV. 1-3 


Dedham, la. 


St. Joseph 


Matthew 


3-5 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Christopher 


Colum 




Kansas City, Kan. 


Holy Family 


Wilfrid 




Churchville, la. 


Assumption 


Noel 




Fredonia, Kan. 


Sacred Heart 


Alvin 




Morrice, Mich. 


St. Marx- 


Linus 


5-7 


Alhambra, Calif. 


All Souls 


Aidan 


10-12 


Dea Moines, la. 


All Saints 


Regis 




Newhall, Calif. 


Sacred Heart 


Aidan 


12-14 


Detroit, Mich. 


St. Brigid 


Julius 




San Diego, Calif. 


St. DidactU 


Aidan 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Mary Magdalen 


Finan 




Atlantic, la. 


SS. Peter and Paul 


Malachy 




What Cheer, la. 


St. Joseph 


Ronan 




E. Pleasant Plain, 


la. St. Joseph 


Rene 


17-19 


Des Moines, la. 


Christ the King 


Coluniban 




Richland, la. 


Immac Concepl 


Rene 


19-21 


Detroit. Midi. 


St. Augustine 


Linus 




Aurora. III. 


St. Joseph 


George 



77 



DEC. 



JAN. 





Jefferson, la. 


St. Joseph 


Hilary 




Detroit, Mich. 


St. Agnes 


Valentine 


20-22 


Glendale, Ariz. 


Perpetual Help 


Edward 


24-26 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Catherine 


Regis 




Melrose, la. 


St. Patrick 


Ronan 




Sheffield, 111. 


St. Patrick 


Hilary 


26-28 


Cofrey, Minn. 


St. Paul 


' Fidelis 




Newport, Mich. 


St. Charles 


Linus 


1-3 


Toluca, 111. 


St. Ann 


Matthias 


3-5 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Ambrose 


Regis 




Keswick, la. 


Lady of Lourdes 


Ronan 


7-9 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Barnabas 


Kilian 


8-10 


Greenfield, la. 


St. John 


Regis 


10-12 


Walnut, Kan. 


St. Patrick 


Leopold 


17-19 


Scammon, Kan. 


St. Bridget 


Leopold 




Palestine, Texas 


Sacred Heart 


Clarence 




Willow Run, Mich. 


St. Alexis 


Theophane 


31-2 


Frontenac, Kan. 


Sacred Heart 


George 


7-9 


Fort Scott, Kan. 


Queen af Angels 


Leopold 




Dearborn, Mich. 


St. Alphonsus 


Ralph 




Louisville, Ky. 


St. Martin 


Fin an 


14-16 


Danville, Kan. 


Immac Concept 


Wilfrid 


21-23 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. John 


Finan 




25 Septembris 

S. VINCENTI MARIAE STRAMBI E. C. 

Congr. nostrae 



In fine sextae Lectionis quae sequuntur addantur verba: ". . . novis deinde 
fulgentem signis Pius Papa duodecimus Anno Sacro subsequenti in Sanctorum 
numerum retulit." 

(S.R.C., 17 Octobris 1950) 



78 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, MARCH 1951 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 
Joseph M 
John Baptist 29 
Forrest 29 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 2 

Neil 3 

Joseph 4 

Camillus 5 

Kilian 7 

Cyril 

Augustine 

David K. 

Vincent X 

Norbert 

Alban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

Conrad 12 

Pius 

Alan 

Kenneth 

Conell 16 

Howard 

Benet 10 

Thaddeus 34 

Barnabas M 

Wm Gail 14 

Gregory Jos 13 

Leo Patrick 

Paul 42 

Godfrey 

Noel 10 

Keith 

Students 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bade 

Rian 

Jude 

Barry 

J. Francis 

Victor 

Gail 

J. Gabriel 



Brothers 

Felix 

Gilbert 

Leo 

John 

Joseph 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert 5 

Egbert 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Ferdinand 

Sylvester 

Nicholas 15 

Cyprian F. 9 

Eustace 

Lambert 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Donald 

Robert 25 

Charles G. 23 

James 10 

Brothers 

Columban 
James 19 
William 22 

LOUISVILLE 

Gordian 5 

Bartholomew 7 

Adalbert 

Charles 

Lawrence 

Anselm 9 

Andrew 

Thomas 

Hubert 37 

Marion 

Arnold 

Robert B. 

Alfred 

Flannon 

Finan 



Roger 34, 36 
John 38 
Fergus 10 
Warren 

Students 

Melvin 
Emmet 
Kent 
Michael 
Ward 

Bernardino 
Dominic 
Venard 
Caspar 

Benedict Joseph 
John Mary- 
Peter Claver 
Luke 
Clement 
Brothers 
Luke 22 
Gabriel 27 
Casimir 20 
Denis 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 40 
John 
Philip 
Aloysius 
Herbert 41 
Kevin 
Claude 
Edgar 41 
Ervan 41 
Anthony Mah 
Germain 41 
Cyprian 41 
William Jos 41 
Emil 41 
Roch 41, 34 
Joel 41 
Leon 

Campion 41 
Raymond 41 

Brothers 

Bernard 19 



Conrad 22 
Regis 20 
David 21 

ST. PAUL 

Elmer 5 

Faustinus 6 

Cormac 7 

Matthew M 

Hyacinth 

Julian 

Edward 

George 

Christopher 9 

Brendan 10 

Leopold 

Jeremias 

Paschal 

Wilfrid 

Alvin 11 

Brothers 

Louis 22 
Philip 19 
Charles 

Novices 

Raphael 

Alphonsus M 

Benedict 

Theodore 

Colman 

Owen 

Francis 

Philip 

Kenan 

Gerald 

Casimir 

Casimir 

Sebastian 

Bro. Justin 

Bro. Robert 

Bro. Joachim 

Bro. Francis 

Bro. Leonard 

Postulants 

Bro. Paul 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 

Miles 7 



Ignatius 

Louis 

Malachy 

Hilary 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Matthew V 34 

Regis 

Ignatius B 30 

Ronan 

Thomas More 31 

Frederick 32 

Noel 

Jordan 

Rene 

Columban 28 

Students 

Myron 

Denis 

Albert 

Eugene 

Meinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 

Francis Martin 

Carl Anthony 

Gerard 

Peter 

Michael Jos. 

Brothers 

Romuald 

Thomas 

George 

DETROIT 

Julius 5 
Ralph 7 
Benedict 
David F. 

Alexis 

Gerald 

Angelo 25 

Linus 

Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Urban 

Timothy 



79 



Roland 


Austin 




Cornelius 


Ludger 


Valentine 


Aid an 




Gregory Mc 


Canisius 


Fidelis 


Joyce 17 




Terrence 


Carl 10 


Patrick 9 


Ed. Guido 




Brice 




Theophane 


Ernest 




Bro. Henry 


FAIRFIELD 


Colum 
Mel 


Isidore 23 
Lucian 24 




SACRAMENTO 


Edmund 9 


Nilus 


Stephen 25 




Basil 5 


- 


Roderick 






Damian 23 


CHINA 


Harold 
Declan 23 
Brothers 

Aloysius 
Theoddre 


Sacred Eloquence 


Dunstan 




Carroll 
Randal 
Firmian - 
Clyde - 




Kenny 25 

Henry 

Jerome 

Bro. Anthony 


Anthony Mai 47 
William W. 18 
Cyprian L. 18 
James L. 49 
Francis Fl. 18 


SIERRA MADRE 


Loran 
Simon 




HOUSTON 

Conleth 8 


Harold Trav. 18 


Herman 5 
Paul Francis 7 


Brothers 




Stanislaus 
Bertrand 


CHAPLAINS 


Reginald 


Richard 




Clarence 


Fabian 43 


Gabriel 


Gerald 




John Aelred 


Leonard 44 


Maurice 26 


Patrick 




Bro. Daniel 


Xavier 45 


Leo 9 








Brian 46 


Martin 


BIRMINGHAM 


ENSLEY 


Cyril M. 48 


Philip 


Canute 8 




Nathanael 9 


Reginald J. 50 






REFERENCES 




1. First General Consultor, SS. Giovanni 


27. Porter 





e Paolo, Rome (147), Italy 

2. Provincial 

3. I Consultor 

4. II Consultor 

5. Rector j 

6. Master of Novices 

7. Vicar 

8. Superior 

9. Pastor 

10. Assistant Pastor 

11. Vice Master 

12. Lector of Church History 

13. Lector of Dogma 

14. Chaplain at Dunning 

15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

16. Provincial Secretary 

17. Director of Students 

18. Catholic Mission, Yuanling, Hunan, 
" China 

19. Cook 

20. Tailor, Infirmarian 

21. Refectorian 

22. Outside Brother 

23. Retreat Director 

24. Assistant Retreat Director 

25. Retreat Master 

26. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 



28. Lector of History 

29. University Students 

30. Lector of English, II Phil. 

31. Lector of I Phil; Hist, of Phil. 

32. Lector of III Phil; Apologetics 

33. All around Brother 

34. Director 

35. Sign Fieldman 

36. Lector of Scripture, Passion 

37. Lector of Canon Law, Pastoral 

38. Moral III & IV 

39. Assistant Cook 

40. Chaplain, St. Vincent's 

41. Lector 

42. Vocational Director 

43. 723 5th Ave., Kalispell, Mont. 

44. Veterans Administration 
P.O. Box 9821, Aspinwall, Pa. 

45. Catholic Chaplain, U.S. Naval Hospital, 
Chelsea, Mass. 

46. Catholic Chaplain, U.S. Naval Station, 
Atak, Alaska 

47. Maryknoll House, Stanley, Hong Kong 

48. c/o Holy Cross Monastery, Cincinnati 

49. The Sign, Union City, N.J. 

50. Sick Leave 



80 



OUainaLU l*om 

1) Masses of the Passion (English) 

2) Mass of St. Gemma (Latin for large Missal) 

3) Office of St. Gemma (limited supply) 

4) "God's Own Method" by Fr. Aloysius, C.P. 

5) Additiones et Variationes in OfDciis Propriis C.P. 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

8) Order to be observed by C.P. Choir at High-or Solemn Mass 

9) Passionist Bulletin (Nos. 19-28) bound 

10) "THE PASSIONIST" 1948, 1949, bound 

11) Mary's Cavalier (St. Gabriel) by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P. 

13) Voice and Speech Routine by Fr. Conleth, C.P. 

14) First Catholic Mission to the Australian Aborigines, by Fr. 

Osmund, C.P. 




BULLETIN OF HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 




THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished quarterly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each March, 
June, September, and Decem- 
ber. Financed by free-will of- 
ferings of its readers. There 
is no Copyright. The paper is 
a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. Contributions of our 
Missionaries to the Mission- 
ary Forum are invited. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Vox Patris 81 

Eucharistic Congress 82 

Most Precious Blood 92 

Christ the King 99 

Notes on the Passion 105 

Special Mission Work 110 

Passionist Diet (III) 116 

Passionist Prayer „ 122 

Chronicle 130 

Varia 146 



VOX PATRIS 



Regulations for those Lay Brothers 
who are engaged as brick-layers and 
in construction. 



1. Since they do not rise at mid- 
night, let them rise at six o'clock 
in the morning and make mental 
prayer until eight o'clock, including 
Mass. If they cannot hear Mass at 
an early hour, let them go to work 
at eight o'clock and hear the last 
Mass later on. 

2. In the evening let them make 
at least a half hour's prayer and 
then go to their work. 

3. Fr. Rector can give them a lit- 
tle collation in the morning after 
they have worked for some hours, 
but let it be with religious modera- 
tion, especially if they are going to 
the common table with the others. 
But there is never to be a lunch in 
the afternoon. 

4. On Wednesday, Friday, and 
Saturday let them not be given the 
collation in the morning, but in the 
evening they can always be given 
something more since whoever 
works has more need of something 
to conserve his strength. 

5. Let the Rector recommend 
that those who work only speak 



' 1 5i 




|Qi 






K 


i 




•";■*•, fiSSBflP 



what is necessary for the work 
they do, and then remain silent in 
order to keep their spirit recollected 
in God. 

6. Let the Rector visit them and 
suggest some maxims to help them 
hold their heart recollected in God 
and to be exemplary, especially in 
that Retreat being built at Rome, 
where more than elsewhere it is 
fitting to be bonus odor Christi in 
omni loco. 

7. We recommend this matter to 
the zeal of the Fr. Rector with all 
earnestness as an obligation on our 
conscience. 

1st of April — Cerro 

General 



* This letter is not properly one of Our Holy Founder'! Circular Letters. The original, which 
is still extant, is directed to the Rector of the Retreat of Monte Cavo. and carries the date 
April 1, 1765. No doubt the norms it contains served also in the case of other Houses where 
circumstances were the Mine. 

81 





A first-hand account — 
written twenty-five years 
ago — of the events that 
made history in Chicago, 
June 20-24, 1926. 



onfless 



THE history of the Eucharistic 
Congresses goes back scarcely 
over half a century. Like every 
great work in the history of the 
human race, it was begun in ob- 
scurity with hardly a thousand pil- 
grims in a little town in France. 
This great work has slowly devel- 
oped and expanded until it has 
reached the peak of its ambitions 
in the recently concluded Congress 
of 1926, when with unexampled fer- 
vor the people of the United States 
gathered — a million strong — to 
worship their God and their All in 
the Consecrated Host. 

The preparation for the great 
event was begun months in advance. 



82 



Slowly the immensity of the occa- 
sion grew upon the people of Chi- 
cago. In the non-Catholic world 
as well as the Catholic, the business 
world as well as the religious, 
among good, bad and indifferent 
the Eucharistic Congress became 
the outstanding topic of interest. 

The fact that the Congress was 
such an outstanding success — far 
beyond the hopes of even the most 
sanguine — is a monument of glory 
to the fair name of Chicago and the 
people of the New World. Catholic 
Europe stood aghast at the record 
of this great achievement. It is 
true that the Eucharistic Congress 
idea originated in the mind of Cath- 
olic France, and its approbation 
was given in Catholic Italy. How- 
ever, it remained for America to 



startle the whole world, Jewish, 
Gentile, Pagan and Christian by its 
first Eucharistic Congress. 

It is said that great men and 
events never attain their full sta- 
ture until fifty years after their 
passing. If so — if the greatness of 
the reality will break upon the 
minds of our people only with the 
years — let it be remembered that 
those of us who engaged in the 
Congress understood and appreciat- 
ed the singular privilege that was 
ours. 

THE CONGRESS 

Thursday An estimated crowd 

June 17, 1926 f 200,000 people 
lined Michigan Boule- 
vard from the Illinois Central Sta- 
tion to the doors of Holy Name 




During the Procession. Those readily visible are (left to right) Fr. Clement 
Lee, C.P. (Province of St. Paul of Cross), Fr. Denis (allagee, C.P., Fr. Bernard 
Brady, C.P. (head visible over Fr. Denis' shoulder), Fr. Bonaventure Oberst, 
C.P., Fr. Mark Hoskins, C.P., Fr. Boniface Fielding, C.P., and (over his right 
shoulder) Rev. Fr. Cletus Brady, C.P. 



83 



Cathedral, to greet with open arms 
the main body of visiting Cardinals 
and Prelates arriving in the city. 
These same dignitaries had received 
their first shock of an American 
welcome when they arrived in New 
York. Still, Chicago was not out- 
done in the welcome she extended 
to these men who had come from 
across the seas to write History in 
Chicago. 

Monsignori, Bishops, Archbish- 
ops and Cardinals were driven 
through the city to the loud acclaim 
of Welcome ringing in their ears. 
The procession — more a parade- 
halted at the Cathedral doors, and 
the visitors entered for a period of 
thanksgiving for a happy and suc- 
cessful voyage. 

Before recounting the happenings 
of the succeeding days of the Con- 
gress, it is well to enumerate the 
visiting Cardinals, for these were 
the center of public attraction 
throughout the week. There was, 
first of all, the Cardinal Legate J. 
Bonzano, followed by Cardinal Du- 
bois of Paris, Cardinal Charoas of 
Rennes (France), Cardinal Faul- 
hauber of Munich, Cardinal O'Don- 
nell of Ireland, Cardinal Czernoch 
of Czecho-Slovakia, Cardinal Piffl 
of Austria, Cardinal Casanova of 
Spain, Cardinal Hayes of New 
York, and our own Cardinal Mun- 
delein of Chicago. 

Besides these outstanding men, 
there were a great number of Arch- 
bishops and bishops from through- 
out the Catholic world — men of no 



mean ability and position in its 
government — men whom it would 
have been an honor to welcome had 
there been no Cardinals at all. 



Friday 
June 18 



Chicago tendered its 
official welcome to the 
Cardinal Legate Fri- 
day evening, June 18, with speeches 
of welcome by the Mayor of Chi- 
cago, the Governor of Illinois, and 
a special letter of welcome from 
President Coolidge, read to the as- 
sembly by Secretary of Labour Da- 
vis. Men of high official and social 
rank took part in the ceremony 
held in the Coliseum. A short but 
very apt word of thanks by Hisi 
Eminence, the Cardinal Legate con- 
cluded the occasion. 



Saturday 
June 19 



Chicago stood in awed 
expectation and in- 
tense anticipation of 
the great event the morrow was to 
bring. As Sunday drew near, visi- 
tors from the length and breadth 
of the land began to arrive in the 
city in numbers the city had never 
known before. When the immense 
trek of people into the city had 
ceased, it was estimated that Chi- 
cago had welcomed at least a mil- 
lion visitors. 



Sunday 
June 20 



The 28th Internation- 
al Eucharistic Con- 
gress opened at dawn 
to a gorgeous and beautiful sight. 
Every Parish in the city, some for 
the first time, had the services of 
one or other of the 300 Bishops for 
Solemn Pontifical Mass. His Emi- 



84 



nence Cardinal Mundelein had 
promised the Holy Father a gift 
of 1,000,000 Communions on the 
opening day of the Congress. It 
was more probably 2 million who 
that morning received their Saviour 
into their hearts and prayed for 
the intentions of His Holiness, Pope 
Pius XI. 

The Congress was officially 
opened at 11 a.m. at Holy Name 
Cathedral in the presence of 12 
Cardinals, 300 Bishops and Arch- 



sembled here was a body of men 
from every land in Europe and 
America, from nations that have 
for centuries distrusted each other 
with the bitterness of inborn pre- 
judice. From far-off India and near- 
by Mexico, here was a group of 
international figures, united in 
heart and mind and purpose, that 
Versailles or Locarno might well 
envy. Belgium gives the kiss of 
peace to Italy, Italy to France, 
France to Germany, Germany to 



During the entire time of the Congress there was Exposition of the Most 
Blessed Sacrament at the Cathedral, both day and night. Confessors were avail- 
able all during this time. Various groups of priests, most from Religious Com- 
munities, were selected and given specified hours, the choice generally being left 
up to them. Very Rev. Fr. Rector expressed a wish for the hours from midnight 
to 8:00 A.M. This left the Fathers so engaged free during the daytime to attend 
the many gatherings, such as the Solemn Masses at Soldier Field, the Confer- 
ences and panel discussions. 

Cots were furnished in the Cathedral school, and breakfast was served. There 
was also opportunity for saying Mass in the school. The number and quality of 
the Confessions were most consoling. It took on much the atmosphere of a 
Mission. Many an old timer made his peace with God. 



bishops, thousands of priests, and 
one-half million people. The ven- 
erable Bishop Heylan of Belgium, 
the president of the committee on 
the Eucharistic Congress, was cele- 
brant at the Mass, while His Emi- 
nence Cardinal Mundelein preached 
the sermon. 

Perhaps the most impressive 
event of all — one that caught the 
eye and sent a thrill through the 
hearts of all present, and that the 
Press eagerly seized upon and wired 
back to thousands of American 
newspapers- -was a simple cere- 
mony of Solemn Mass, the Pax. As- 



Ireland, Ireland to America, Ameri- 
ca to Spain. Down the line of Car- 
dinals, Bishops and Monsignori and 
priests goes the kiss of peace — a 
fitting symbol of the great unity of 
the Catholic Church. 

Fully 500,000 people jammed the 
streets outside the Cathedral. Stra- 
tegically placed microphones en- 
abled all to follow the ceremonies 
easily, and brought the Mass and 
sermon to the visiting multitudes 
unable to enter the Cathedral. 

This concluded the programme 
for the opening day of the Con- 
gress, and provided an opportunity 



85 



for the many visitors to acquaint 
themselves with the city. Cardinal 
O'Donnell, who received a great 
amount of attention wherever he 
went, took in the Yankee-White 
Sox baseball game, where Babe 
Ruth and other Catholic players 
came up to kiss his ring. 



dium in Grant Park, named Sol- 
diers' Field in memory of the many 
American lads lying dead in France, 
has a seating capacity of at least 
100,000, and it was packed beyond 
capacity. Moreover, when the 
priests and prelates marched into 
the arena, the whole field was a sol- 



The Passionist Chinese Mission Exhibit was very well represented. In fact 
it was of outstanding merit. A large collection of Chinese handicraft, in silk 
and needle work, in metals and other media was on display. Msgr. Dominic 
Langenbacher, C.P., the Superior of the Mission, was present for the occasion. 
He brought along with him a very choice silk and embroidered white vestment — 
destined as a gift for the Provincial of St. Paul of the Cross Province, Father 
Stanislaus Grennan, C.P. Fr. Stanislaus later donated it to the Immaculate Con- 
ception Monastery, at Norwood Park. 



One of the centers of attraction 
was the great Missionary Exhibit 
at the Municipal Pier, where thou- 
sands were deeply impressed by the 
tangible results of missionary ef- 
forts among the Pagans. Our own 
Passionist Mission in China was 
splendidly represented. 



id mass of humanity, numbering 
at least 200,000 people in all. 

In the center of this multitude 
stood the flower of the Church, 
65,000 children. It was a picture 
unsurpassed for all who saw it. 
Then, suddenly, the trumpets 
sounded. In a flash 65,000 school 



Many distinguished visitors called at the Passionist Mission booths. Among 
them was the well-known benefactor, called the St. Joseph of China, Mr. Lo Pa 
Hung. In his entourage was a white-haired, though quite young, Maryknoll 
Missionary. Among the Passionists in the booths, he picked out one and asked: 
"Aren't you Fr. Ronan?" He was the one who had served Father's Mass at the 
Front during the First World War, when Fr. Edwin was a Chaplain in France. 
In the intervening years, they had not met or known what happened to one 
another. 



Monday 
June 21 



Monday was Chil- 
dren's Day. Those 
who were fortunate 
enough to assist at the ceremonies 
at Soldiers' Field called it Angels' 
Day. A single lifetime could never 
see another spectacle like that of 
Monday morning. The huge sta- 



children twitched nervously in uni- 
son. The keynote was struck, there 
was the raised hand of the Maestro, 
and the ages old Mass of the Angels 
began. Slowly, as the children gath- 
ered strength and courage, the real- 
ization came upon all that here was 
something extraordinary, some- 



86 



thing magnificent that even the 
Church might never duplicate 
again. Sixty-five thousand chil- 
dren's silvery voices ringing out 
the Kyries and Gloria of Solemn 
Mass! Truly, it was like heaven — 
the Mass of the Angels. 

Cardinal Bonzano sang the Mass. 
Archbishop Curley of Baltimore 
preached the sermon. The day 
opened dark and the sky overcast, 
and at times a drop of rain would 
fall upon an up-turned cheek. It 
was windy as only Chicago can be. 



only trained women can sing. But 
the singing could not equal the 
beauty of the children's voices the 
day before, when heaven was 
brought down to earth for a short 
time, then taken back, leaving with 
those that saw and heard a sight 
and a memory never to be effaced. 
Tuesday evening, Men's Night 
as it was called, saw another great 
scene enacted in the same arena. 
For grandeur, power and beauty, 
though of a different order, Men's 
Night equalled Children's Day. 



Arranging transportation was no easy matter for all the Monastery visitors 
during the Eucharistic Congress. Chief of Detectives, Mr. William Shoemaker 
offered his personal car whenever needed. It so happened that it was needed 
the evening of the Holy Name Rally, to transport the Bishops to a special meet- 
ing at the Palmer House. The Chief's son Billy and a Sergeant came to do 
the driving. Using both bell and horn and plenty of speed, they escorted Bishops 
Nussbaum and Drumm (of Des Moines) from the Monastery to the Palmer 
House in just 18 minutes! Afterwards Billy apologized for the slowness of the 
trip. As he drove through Lincoln Park the Mayor's car was just ahead and 
slowed them up considerably. 



However, as the Mass drew to an 
end, the sun broke through the 
overcast, cheering the multitude 
with brilliant sunshine, and turn- 
ing the day into a beautiful mid- 
western first-day-of-summer. 
Tuesday Tuesday was Women's 

June 22 Day. The evening was 

Men's Night. The 
weather was ideal, and the same 
enormous crowd jammed into 
Grant Park. The Mass was sung 
by 10,000 consecrated virgins, but 
a handful of the great army of re- 
ligious women serving Christ 
throughout the Catholic world. 
The Sisters sang beautifully, as 



100,000 Holy Name Men came to- 
gether and were addressed by pro- 
minent speakers, assisted and sang 
heartily at Benediction, and dis- 
persed again, to awake the follow- 
ing morning and find that they had 
written a glorious page in the an- 
nals of the history of the Euchar- 
istic Congress. 

The stadium began to fill early 
in the evening, as the crisp wind 
blew in from the lake. As the 
speakers succeeded one another, 
dusk darkened into night, and when 
the last speaker took the floor the 
massive lights of the stadium 
turned night into day once more. 

87 



The conclusion of the last talk was 
the signal for the start of Bene- 
diction. 

There was a sudden and unex- 
pected change among the crowds 
present. Hundreds, then thousands, 
then tens of thousands of tiny 
sparks began to glitter and dance 
among the multitudes. The stadium 



Universities from every corner of 
these United States assembled in 
young, but now historic, Soldiers' 
Field. 

As on the previous days, the 
crowds were enormous. They 
packed the field and stands, jammed 
against the fences and milled on the 
sidewalks and thorofares — fully 



During the Congress, Immaculate Conception Monastery had at least forty 
guests, mostly our own Fathers from both Eastern and Western Provinces. 
Two Bishops, two Monsignors and several secular priests were also among the 
visitors at the Monastery. The Students occupied the attic, giving up their 
rooms to visiting Passionists. 



lights were extinguished plunging 
the throng into fairy land. There 
in the darkness stood 150,000 men 
with lighted candles, singing the 
great Salutaris. The myriads of 
flickering lights seemed to roll off 
and away into the distant horizon. 
The lights went on again. 150,000 
men rose to their feet and through 



350,000 strong. .'[ 

Solemn Pontifical Mass was fol- 
lowed by talks and speeches by 
some of the foremost educators in 
the land. The best of these — one 
that will be recalled in later times 
as among the best of modern 
speeches — was that of Mr. Scott of 
California. Holy Mother Church 



A letter from Bishop Drumm after his return to Des Moines expressed his 
reaction to the disastrous rain at the solemn Closing at Mundelein. He wrote: 
"As the Cardinals and other high dignitaries trudged along fighting the rain, it 
was a sight to behold their drenched royal robes clinging to their ecclesiastical 
pelts!" It is safe to say that not many were in as humorous a mood as the jovial 
Bishop from Iowa. 



the streets and boulevards of Chica- 
go echoed that powerful, manly 
song of adoration "Holy God we 
praise Thy Name!" 

Wednesday The fourth da ^ of 

June 23 the Congress had been 

set aside as "Higher 
Education Day." Representatives 
from High Schools, Colleges, and 



might well smile her approval on 
this son, she who has smiled upon 
Emmet, O'Connell, Bourdaloue, and 
Lacordaire. 

Thursday In ever y life there 

June 24 come days that are 

apart from all other 
days — days that so impress them- 
selves on one's soul that instead of 



88 



erasing the passing years serve 
only to make them the more mem- 
orable. Such a day was June 24, 
1926. It was a day of brilliant 
memories and of ghastly spectacles. 
It was a most successful conclusion 
and at the same time a most dis- 
astrous ending; scarcely ever have 
the two extremes so met at one and 
the same time. In the very act of 
a most successful conclusion, the 
weather conspired to close it ab- 
ruptly and almost disastrously. For 
days the single topic of conversa- 



in a great sea of humanity, a throng 
being enlarged at every moment by 
thousands of newcomers. Estima- 
tions by the experts were but poor 
guesses that day. Those proffered 
by newspapermen varied from 
500,000 to 1,500,000. 

The day opened with a brilliant 
sunrise and a cloudless sky. The 
morning was ideal. Few were able 
to witness the magnificent spectacle 
of the Solemn Pontifical Mass cele- 
brated by Cardinal Bonzano, and 
sung by the Seminary Choir in St. 



The spectacle of the uniformed children's choir of 60,000 singing the Missa 
de Angelis was one of the most inspiring of the Congress. Such singing under 
five choir leaders dispersed among the group presented an accomplishment that 
few would dare undertake. The children were assembled from Chicago's paro- 
chial schools. The tryout for those of the North Side, 30,000 in all, was held 
at the Cub's Park, while an equal number from the South Side practiced at the 
White Sox Park. They met together for the first time at their Mass in Soldier 
Field. Unfortunately, the children from our own parish at Norwood Park did 
not participate. It seems that the music teacher failed to see the advantage, 
and so our own children missed the joy of a lifetime. 



tion was the 24th of June, 1926. 
Perhaps the mistake had been 
made in deciding to hold the Clos- 
ing at the 100 acre grounds of the 
new Archdiocesan Seminary, situ- 
ated 40 miles north of Chicago, at 
Mundelein, Illinois. To transport 
one million people was a task that 
could scarcely be understood with- 
out previous experiment. What 
would ordinarily have been an 
hour's trip on the electric railroad 
developed into a four hour's jour- 
ney, standing jam-packed in warm 
railroad cars. Upon arrival at the 
grounds, one was simply engulfed 



Mary's Chapel, although micro- 
phones carried the ceremonies 
everywhere throughout the grounds. 
The Closing Procession began to 
form about 2:30 p.m., but it was a 
full hour before even the Clergy 
began to move. What an inspiring 
sight! As the procession turned 
toward the lake, around which it 
was to circle, far across the lake 
could be seen the beginning — a mile 
away, and the same to the rear! 
Every description of race, rank, 
vestment and dignitary had its 
place. Deans, Monsignori, Prelates 
of the Papal Household, Bishops by 



89 



the hundred, Archbishops, Cardi- 
nals, and finally Cardinal Bonzano 
carrying the golden Monstrance. 

It was at this moment that the 
weather took command. The sun 
that had beat down so brightly on 
gold vestments and bronze candle- 
sticks all day suddenly went behind 
a cloud. The sky quickly darkened, 
and a stiff wind blew threatening- 
ly. The procession marched brave- 
ly along, hoping the impending 
shower would hold off till all was 
concluded, between two walls of 
humanity two or three hundred 
deep, around the lake. 

Zip! a drop of rain fell, then 
another, and another — the storm 
was on! Lightning darted across 
the sky, and the thunder rolled 
over the darkened earth. The rain 
came quickly and in torrents. The 
procession moved on, however, in a 
spirit of faith, each one realizing 
that he was not better than the 
Master, Who came behind. Sodden 
hymn cards began to droop, but 
the singing and the praying con- 
tinued as loud as ever. Then the 
rain turned suddenly to hail — hard, 
heavy hail coming down relentless- 
ly. The hail did not last very long. 
In its place came a drizzling rain, 
again. This too, did not last long 
when the sun once more peeped out 
from the overcast; what a sight it 
revealed! Thousands of priests 
from all nations, come to honor 
their Eucharistic King, marching 
along sodden, bedraggled and un- 



dignified, but still smiling, still 
singing and praying! 

As the procession reached its 
starting place once more, the sun 
came out with all the dazzling bril- 
liance of the morning. What a sight 
as the lines parted, in order that 
the Master might pass between! 
Here was a bishop, the ruler of 
some fair diocese far away; how 
lordly and regal he had looked in 
his beautiful vestments at the be- 
ginning of the procession. Now 
they were sodden and faded. There 
was an old priest stumbling along, 
truly a servus Dei, exciting com- 
passion in the hearts of the on- 
lookers. 

Benediction soon followed, and 
the great Eucharistic Congress of 
1926 closed with "Holy God we 
praise Thy Name." From hun- 
dreds of thousands of throats the 
song rose up from the earth and 
resounded across the heavens with 
its climaxing "Holy, holy, holy 
Lord!" The Congress was over. 
It was a tremendous success, and 
those who saw it and lived through 
it will not soon forget how history 
was made in Chicago. Even the 
night-marish aftermath of over 
1,000,000 people attempting to leave 
the Seminary grounds all at once 
and the consequent jam that en- 
sued, could not make one regret 
that he took part in the Eucharistic 
Congress at Chicago, June 20 to 24, 
1926. 

Rev. Fr. Roland, C.P. 



90 








The Sovereign Pontiff has deigned to name Rev. Fr. Ubald (Cibrian) of the 
Name of Mary, C.P., (above) the new Administrator Apostolic of the recently 
established Prelature Nullius of Corocoro, Bolivia. His Excellency filled several 
offices in the Province of the Most Precious Blood, in Spain, including Lector 
of Theology, Rector and twice Provincial Consultor. The territory of the Pre- 
lature nullius comprises four civil provinces in Bolivia, numbering 28 greatly 
extended parishes. The Passionist extends sincerest congratulations to the 
new Prelate. 



91 



The 
Most 
Precious 
Blood 

SELECTIONS 
AND 

REFLECTIONS 
FOR JULY 

by 

FR. CASPAR, C.P. 



History 
of the 
Devotion 



In the course of the long 
life of the Church many 
feasts have come into ex- 
istence. A great number 
refer to the mysteries of the life 
of our Divine Lord. It is fitting to 
honor with a special devotion cer- 
tain parts of the Sacred Humanity 
of Christ. However, it is for the 
Church to decide and to define what 
parts or what mysteries are to be 
proposed to the public for special 
worship. 1 She has done this in re- 
gard to the Holy Wounds of our 
Saviour, His Most Precious Blood, 
and especially His Most Sacred 
Heart. 

92 



The history of the devotion to 
the Precious Blood dates from the 
elaborate ritual and striking sym- 
bolism of the Old Testament which 
finds an anti-type in the Sacrificial 
Priest and Victim on Calvary. The 
Epistles of St. Paul, especially those 
to the Hebrews — called the Epistle 
of the Precious Blood — the first 
Epistles of Sts. Peter and John, 
as well as the Apocalypse, testify to 
the connection between the Cove- 
nant in blood in the old Law and the 
New. 

The Fathers who give a large 
place in their writings to the doc- 
trine of the Precious Blood, are, 
in the East St. John Chrysostom, 
and in the West, St. Augustine. A 
great many saints have been es- 
pecially devoted to the Most Pre- 
cious Blood, among them St. Ger- 
trude, St. Catherine of Siena, called 
the Prophetess of the Precious 
Blood, St. Mary Magdalen de Paz- 
zis. Among the men there have 
been St. Robert Bellarmine, who 
composed the Vesper hymn for the 
feast, Blessed Gaspar del Bufalo, 
Founder of the Precious Blood Fa- 
thers, and St. Vincent Mary Stram- 
bi, who encouraged Bl. Gaspar, and 
at the insistence of his friend wrote 
a book of meditations on the Pre- 
cious Blood for the month of July. 
Raison Walter Farrel, O.P., sum- 
d'etre marizes the teaching of 
St. Thomas on the role of 
the Precious Blood in our Redemp- 
tion as follows : "The sacredness 
of life was given a vivid emphasis 






in the Old Testament's insistencce 
on profound respect for blood. It 
was so clear that the life of a man 
poured out of him when his blood 
gushed out on the ground that the 
blood was easily taken as a symbol 
of all of bodily life. It was not food 
to be eaten, but sacrifice to be of- 
fered in recognition of God's sole 
dominion over life and death. Blood 
was "the life of the flesh." (Lev. 
17,11) The blood of animals, poured 
out on the altar, was a sacrifice of 
life to the Master of Life, an ac- 
knowledgement of the supreme 
lordship of God. Blood was seen 
as the life of the flesh ; to eat it was 
a presumption that went as far as 
the consumption of life itself. 

"The blood of Christ is infinitely 
precious, as are His fingers, His 
hands, His arms; for all of these 
belong to a Divine Person, the Sec- 
ond Person of the Blessed Trinity. 
When we speak of the preciousness 
of the blood of Christ, however, 
we mean more than this. In the 
light of the Old Testament, which 
He fulfilled, the blood of Christ 
means His whole bodily life. "You 
were not redeemed with corruptible 
things as gold or silver . . . but with 
the precious blood of Christ, as of 
a lamb unspotted and undefiled." 
(1 Pet. 1,18) This was the price 
of redemption, the whole bodily life 
of Christ ; and this was the price 
He paid. 

"As the blood flowed on Calvary 
from His hands and feet, His Head 
and Heart, the life poured out of 



the Son of God for the redemption 
of men. An awful price. To whom 
was it paid? To whom were men 
in bondage to such an extent that 
only such a ransom would free 
them? 

"We needed rescue from the mal- 
ice of the devil ; but this is not the 
story of our redemption. The ter- 
rifying truth that explains the ne- 
cessity of Calvary is that we need- 
ed redemption from the entirely 
just and inexorable penalties of the 
justice of God. The red blood 
dripped down the cross on Calvary 
and life flowed out of the Son of 
Mary, not to satisfy the extortions 
of diabolical hate, but to deliver us 
from the wrath of the living God. 

"Precious blood indeed, for it is 
a terrible thing to fall under the 
wrath of God. Precious blood, shed 
but not lost, given up by God to be 
gathered, every drop, by God and 
held for eternity; the boundless 
treasure by which self-made slaves 
are freed from the penalties sin de- 
manded of the strong arm of God. 
Who else but God could stay the 
power of God's justice? Precious 
Blood "because the life of the flesh 
is in the blood : and I have given it 
to you, that you may make atone- 
ment with it upon the altar for your 
souls: and the blood may be for 
an expiation of the soul." (Lev. 17, 
ll) 2 

Nature of Canon Herve points 

the Devotion ou t that "The Divine 

Word assumed His 

whole human nature at the same 



93 



time by an immediate and perpetu- 
al union. . . . The Word immediate- 
ly assumed an integral human na- 
ture with all that pertains to its 
essence, or integrity, and perfec- 
tion. . . ." 

"Regardless of the physiological 
question ... it is theologically cer- 
tain that blood is an integral part 
of the human nature and was im- 
mediately assumed by the Word. 
This is clearly seen in Scripture, 
speaking of the blood of the Son 
of God and attributing to it our 
redemption : The blood of Jesus 
Christ, his Son, cleanses us from 
all sin.' Tradition is expressed in 
the words of Clement VI : '. . . the 
least drop of blood ... on account 
of its union with the Word would 
have sufficed to redeem the whole 
human race.' " 3 

Therefore the material object of 
devotion to the Precious Blood is 
the whole Christ. More especially, 
the proximate material object is the 
physical, living Blood that is one 
with the glorified Body. The formal 
object of the devotion is the un- 
created excellence of the Divine 
Word, and the special formal ob- 
ject is the particular excellence of 
the Most Precious Blood, which was 
actually shed on Calvary for our 
salvation in loving obedience to the 
command of the Eternal Father. 

The practical aim of the devotion 
is "to awaken confidence, contrition, 
reparation — by bearing Christ's 
Cross, zeal for the Church and for 



souls, including in an especial man- 
ner the souls in Purgatory. . . . The 
practices honoring the Precious 
Blood are devout reception of the 
Blood sacramentally, adoration of 
the Blood actually or mystically 
shed, and meditation on these mys- 
teries, acts of satisfaction for those 
redeemed yet suffering souls in 
Purgatory, acts of love and grati- 
tude founded on deep faith and 
confidence in Christ Crucified, the 
recitation of prayers in honor of 
Christ's Passion. . . ." 4 

Character- In nis book on tne Pre " 
istics cious Blood, Father Fa- 

ber gives us an insight 
into the special characteristics of 
this devotion. "All devotions have 
their characteristics ; all of them 
have their own theological mean- 
ings. . . . Another characteristic of 
the devotion of the Precious Blood 
is the way it brings out and keeps 
before us the principle of sacrifice. 
Sacrifice is peculiarly the Christian 
element of holiness ; and it is pre- 
cisely the element which corrupt 
nature dislikes and resists. There 
is no end to the delusions, which 
our self-love is fertile enough to 
bring forth, in order to evade the 
obligation of sacrifice, and to nar- 
row its practical application. If it 
were enough to have correct views, 
or high feelings, or devout aspira- 
tions, it would be easy to be spiri- 
tual. The touchstone is mortifica- 
tion. Worldly amusements, domes- 
tic comforts, nice food, and a daily 
doing of our own will in the lesser 



94 



details of life, are all incompatible 
with sanctity, when they are habi- 
tual and form the ordinary normal 
current of our lives. Pain is neces- 
sary to holiness. Suffering is es- 
sential to the killing of self-love. 
Habits of virtue cannot by any pos- 
sibility be formed without volun- 
tary mortifications. . . . These are 
axioms which at all times offend our 
weakness and self-indulgence. But 
they are of peculiar importance in 
times like these, when comforts and 
even luxuries are almost universal. 
It is comfort which is the ruin of 
holiness. . . . There is a smooth- 
ness in the mere lapse of a com- 
fortable life which is fatal to holi- 
ness. Now all the forms, and imag- 
es and associations and pictures and 
ideas of the devotion to the Pre- 
cious Bood breathe sacrifice. Their 
fragrance is the odour of sacrifice. 
Their beauty is the austerity of 
sacrifice. They tease the soul with 
a constant sense of dissatisfaction 
and distrust with whatsoever is not 
sacrifice; and this teasing is the 
solicitation of grace. In time they 
affect us with a love of sacrifice ; 
and to gain this love of sacrifice is 
to have mounted the first ascent of 
holiness. ... It is the very mission 
of the devotion to the Precious 
Blood to preach a crusade against 
quiet sinless comforts. . . . 

"It is another characteristic of 
the devotion to the Precious Blood 
that it does not usurp the place of 
other devotions ; but by its own 
growth makes more room for them 



... It mingles in a most natural 
way with devotion to our Blessed 
Lady. It is an additional splendour 
to every one of her mysteries. It 
throws light on them. It brings 
her into the mysteries of Jesus. It 
has, a peculiar connection with the 
Immaculate Conception. It forms in 
itself a separate devotion to her 
immaculate heart and sinless blood. 

"It is also a variety of devotion 
to the Passion. It furnishes a point 
of view from which we may regard 
each mystery, while it is also a 
mould in which we can fuse all 
the mysteries of the Passion into 
one. It is thus a unity of the devo- 
tion to the Passion as well as a 
variety of it, besides being in itself 
an additional devotion to the Pas- 
sion. When we wish to range the 
whole Passion in one view, we find 
that simply to look upon it as the 
single mystery of the Passion, it 
is too large for us and becomes 
vague. Now vagueness is precisely 
what we must try to avoid in devo- 
tion to the Passion. Its virtue re- 
sides in its vividness. Unless it is 
vivid, it will not be true ; and un- 
less it be true it will not be rever- 
ent. 

"Devotion to the Precious Blood 
also supplies us with an additional 
form of devotion to the Blessed Sac- 
rament. The devotion to the Pre- 
cious Blood in the chalice may be 
considered, not merely as an addi- 
tional form of devotion, but as an 
additional devotion to the Blessed 
Sacrament ; while the special adora- 



95 



tion of the Precious Blood, when 
we are kneeling before the taberna- 
cle is a form of devotion, bringing 
much doctrine before us, and en- 
abling us better to comprehend the 
august realities of that tremen- 
dous Sacrament. 

"But the closest alliance of the 
devotion of the Precious Blood is 
with the devotion to the Sacred 
Heart. The Precious Blood is the 
wealth of the Sacred Heart. ... It 
was precisely the Precious Blood 
. . . which was the chosen instru- 
ment of our redemption. ... If it 
were not for this, the devotion to 
the Precious Blood and the devo- 
tion to the Sacred Heart would be 
but one devotion, two aspects of 
the same devotion." 5 
F . f Father Faber also has 

th^Devotion an admirable treat- 
ment of the fruits of 
devotion to the Precious Blood. 
"Here is (a) fruit of the spirit of 
this devotion to the Precious Blood. 
The greatest defect in our worship 
of God is our want of confidence in 
Him. Confidence is the genuineness 
of worship, and the tranquil pleni- 
tude of love. What can give us more 
confidence in God than the study of 
the Precious Blood ? Who can doubt 
Jesus when He bleeds? . . . Another 
gift of this devotion is a vehement 
and intelligent hatred of sin. . . . 
The Precious Blood is His Blood, 
Who is Uncreated Truth. It is His 
Blood who came with His truth to 
redeem souls. Hence love of souls 
is another grace which comes from 



the spirit of this devotion. ... In 
close connection with this grace we 
should name, as another fruit of the 
spirit of this devotion, a great de- 
votion to the Sacraments. . . . The 
effect of this devotion upon our de- 
votion to our Blessed Lady may well 
be named as one of its graces, one 
of the revelations of its spirit. It 
makes our devotion to her an in- 
tegral part of our devotion to Jesus. 
It makes the two devotions one. It 
draws her into the scheme of re- 
demption so intimately and at the 
same time with such splendours of 
separate exaltation, that the very 
highest of language of the saints 
about her becomes easy to us, and 
is the only natural expression of 
our inward love. To be enthusias- 
tic our love of Mary only needs to 
be theological. . . ." 6 

,, , .. In his "Compendi- 

Mary and the . 

Precious Blood um of Manology 

Father Keuppens 
treats of Mary and her role as as- 
sociate with Christ the Redeemer in 
the manner of redemption, and 
says the price paid by the Blessed 
Virgin was not only her sorrows but 
the same price Christ paid, namely, 
His Passion, Life and Precious 
Blood. It was Mary's inasmuch as 
it stems from the most pure blood 
of her Immaculate heart. 7 Pius X 
writes, in "Ad diem ilium" : "By 
this communion of sorrows and will 
between Mary and Christ, she mer- 
ited to become a most worthy Re- 
paratrix of the fallen world, and 
therefore the Dispensatrix of all 



96 



that Jesus won for us by His Blood 
and Death." Benedict XV remarks 
that "She suffered with her Suffer- 
ing Son, and almost died together 
with him, and abdicating her ma- 
ternal rights over her Son, she in 
so far as was in her power immolat- 
ed Him for the human race, that 
justice might be satisfied, so that 
it may be truly said that together 
with Christ she redeemed man- 
kind." 8 

„ e ., The feast of the 

Feast of the _ 

Precious Blood Most Precious 

Blood dates to the 
17th century. It was formerly the 
Friday of the fourth week in Lent 
and not a universal feast. Pius IX, 
on June 30, 1849, extended the 
feast to the universal Church and 
placed it on the first Sunday of 
July, in gratitude for deliverance 
from the great perils that attended 
the first years of his pontificate. It 
was likewise Pius IX who dedicated 
July to the Most Precious Blood. 
In the Jubilee eYar of 1933, the an- 
niversary of our Redemption, Pius 
XI elevated the feast to that of 
First Class to be celebrated by the 
Universal Church on July l. 9 

It was in 1949, the Centenary of 
the extension of the feast of the 
Most Precious Blood, to the univer- 
sal Church that Pope Pius XII, 
asked all to "recall to mind this di- 
vine price of our redemption which 
was offered to the Eternal Father 
that we might be freed from the 
slavery of the devil and be restored 
to the adoption of the sons of God. 



Wherefore let each one of us, de- 
testing his admissions, strive with 
all his strength to make amends for 
the injuries done to our Redeemer 
and follow after him with the 
most intense love, which a life re- 
integrated with Christian morals 
will proclaim. When Christ shed 
his blood he consecrated human 
grief that all might learn from him 
the labors and miseries that they 
suffer — bearing them with a serene 
and stalwart spirit, mindful of that 
divine pronouncement that "he who 
does not take up his cross and fol- 
low me is not worthy of me." (Matt 
10,38) Thus Our Saviour through 
his most poignant torments wished 
to soothe and soften our sadness 
so that by his example all might 
learn to relieve the trouble and 
grief of others — giving them solace 
and aid insofar as they are able. 
This is what thhe Precious Blood 
teaches, which Jesus Christ no 
longer pours forth from his wounds, 
but even daily offers in the Euchar- 
istic Sacrifice a pleasing victim for 
all of us." 10 

Conclusion Th e foregoing selec- 
tions reflect not only 
the justification for our devotion to 
the Most Precious Blood, but also 
its great dignity and beauty. The 
subject provides inspiration not on- 
ly to the theologian but to the 
preacher, teacher and writer as 
well. It almost seems as though it 
was to Passionists that Pope Pius 
XII might have been speaking when 



97 



he said (to the assembled Fathers every second of our day finds some- 

of the Missionary Society of the where in the world the elevation of 

Most Precious Blood) : "You, there- five chalices of the Precious Blood, 

fore, in a special way, whose In- Every second an opportunity to 

stitute bears the very name of this unite ourselves in thought and af- 

devotion, should meditate with in- fection with Christ our Eternal 

tent and loving mind on these High Priest! Every second is an 

things ; and propose the same to opportunity to add to our offering 

others for meditation, when oppor- of confidence and gratitude to the 

tunity offers. . . ." X1 Eternal Father an offering of lov- 

It will help for each one of us to ing atonement, in fulfillment of 

fathom the depths of our wonderful that part of our spirit that urges 

Passionist vocation if we let our- us to "fill up what is lacking of the 

selves be led by a strong devotion sufferings of Christ for His body 

to the Most Precious Blood. For, which is the Church". (Col. 1,24) 

REFERENCES 

1 Herve II, n. 510 7 Keuppens, Compendium of Mariology, n. 312, p. 135 

2 Sign, Vol. 28, p. 38, (1949) 8 Inter Sodalicia 

3 Herve II, n. 486 9 Sacramentary 

4Eccl. Rev., Vol. 83, p. 14, (1930) 10 AAS Aug. 16, 1949, pp. 358, 359 

5 Faber, The Precious Blood, pp. 274-281 n Ibid., 

6 Faber, Ibid., pp. 288-295 



"SELECTED LETTERS OF 
RECENT PASSIONIST GENERALS" 

Edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew (Vetter) of the Holy 

Family, C.P. 



Containing 14 Letters of past and present 
Generals, 1925-1950, 315 pages with Index, 



Order from "The Passionist" 



98 




£kist the f{inq ^etfieat ^ftme 



A report 
on its First 
Birthday. 



CHRIST the King Retreat House 
was dedicated May 7, 1950. 
The first lay retreats were sched- 
uled May 19, 1950. A glance over 
the past year shows how well the 
Retreat Movement has caught on in 
Northern California. 

As of Easter, 1951, a total of 848 
men attended the 38 Retreats held 
during the past year. The average 




Mkh* 




View showing one half the Refectory. The partition down the center allows 
greater seating capacity. (Below) View of Lobby giving view into the Patio. 




100 




View showing the interior of the Chapel, with the men on Retreat. Fr. Kenny, 
C.P., the Retreat Master, has since been recalled to the U.S. Army. 



has been 22 men. However, since 
the first days of 1951, the average 
has jumped to 30 men each week. 
On one occasion overflow crowds 
had to sleep at a motel. On another 
occasion, the men of Willows, Cali- 
fornia brought along their own 
sleeping bags. Both groups went 
far beyond their quotas. 

During the first six months, as 
was to be expected, the Retreat Di- 
rector found it difficult to get 
crowds of men to make the Re- 
treats. However, since the 119 
priests of the Diocese of Sacramen- 
to made their retreat at the Re- 
treat House, the problem lias 
steadily dwindled. Now the big 



problem is to limit the parishes 
in such a way that each par- 
ish in the Diocese will have an op- 
portunity to send a number of men. 
Many of the Sacramento parishes 
desired three week-ends for their 
men. Some of the up-state cities 
sought two week-ends. The present 
arrangement allows each parish two 
retreats per year. The outlying 
towns are limited to one. 

There are two groups — Eureka 
and Scotia — that travel 300 miles 
each way to make their retreat. 
The men of Susanville travel 201 
miles, the men of Redding 170 and 
those of Ukiah 149! These latter 
are the most enthusiastic- bunch at 



101 



Christ the King Retreat House. 
Already they have sent three clas- 
ses of men. Great distances seem to 
mean little to the men of Northern 
California. In the face of such en- 
thusiasm, it is regrettable that 
funds were lacking to complete the 
Retreat House. 

The Alcoholics Anonymous began 
with one retreat a year, but since 
have changed to two. These men 
are mostly non-Catholic, outnum- 
bering the Catholics two to one. 
Some of these men come from Fres- 
no, a hundred sixty-nine miles 
away. When the first group made 
their retreat, last October, they 
signed up for this year before leav- 
ing the House. These men were 
remarkable for the way in which 
they kept the retreat silence. 

Analysing the success that has 



FLOOR PLAN 

The floor plan shows the fine ar- 
rangement of Christ the King Retreat 
House. The second floor plan is iden- 
tical with the first, save that above 
the Refectory is the Assembly Room. 
The Library occupies the space on the 
second floor corresponding to the Lob- 
by, while above the Patio is the Loft, 
with special windows opening into 
the Chapel from the Second Floor. 
There are also doors from the second 
floor entering out onto the roof of the 
Arcade. 

As is evident from the Floor Plan, 
there are thirty private rooms, three 
offices and linen and store rooms in 
addition to the Chapel, Refectory and 
Kitchen. The Basement {under the 
extreme half of the dormitory wing) 
contains a heater room, laundry room, 
store room and a four car garage. 




102 



come to the Retreat House in Citrus 
Heights, we find many contributing 
factors. First of all, there is the 
location. It is easily accessible from 
all directions. The men of San 
Francisco are anxious to come to 
Citrus Heights, but as yet only in- 
dividuals, instead of organized 
groups, have been accepted. To- 
gether with our central location, 
we still have our monastic seclusion. 
Another contributing factor is our 
fine building. The poured-concrete 
remains cool through the long sum- 



thousand dollars worth of trees, 
shrubbery and plants. He promoted 
the building of the new fish pond, 
and often gets together a group of 
men to come out for a full day of 
work on Saturdays. He never al- 
lows a week to go by but he comes 
out to inspect the progress of his 
plants. Every week his trucks 
bring some new plants and shrubs. 
Since the arrival of Brother Pat- 
rick, from Sierra Madre, we have 
been able to keep ahead of Jerry 
Olrich's best efforts. 



M"±^"±"^±iM 




CORRIDOR 



iM Bm. I *m. £fM Rm. I TIM. Y%£\ Rm. I *«.ra$3 *m. |l.ne N 



mer and is easy to heat in the win- 
ter. The individual washrooms 
eliminate the night-walking in the 
corridors, the noisy washrooms and 
the thousand and one other incon- 
veniences that public washrooms 
bring, and thus remove many of the 
causes for breaking silence. Con- 
sequently, a man can make a better 
retreat. 

Because the house is so beautiful, 
many of the Retreatants have 
shown a special interest in the im- 
provement of the grounds. Out- 
standing among them is Mr. Jerry 
Olrich. He has procured over three 



Christ the King has a "winning 
team." Our retreat masters have 
been exceptionally good, our super- 
iors intensely interested in the 
work, and our cook has put out ex- 
cellent meals. The religious have 
given generously of their time. 
Christ the King Retreat House pre- 
sents a united front to the men who 
come here for Retreats. Our home 
life has been blessed because of the 
full observance. Since the cities in 
Northern California are mostly 
small, the word has spread quickly 
about Christ the King, and it has 
been favorable. 



103 



We are deeply grateful to Al- we shall continue and in time ex- 
mighty God for these many bless- pand. 

ings, and the retreatants appreciate Fr. Damian, C.P. 

them too. With His continued help Retreat Director 




CHAIN-REACTION 

Miss Helen Grace Smith wrote the first life of Fr. Fidelis of the Cross. She 
is now a venerable old lady, in her eighties, but has never lost her love for the 
Passionists nor her interest in their accomplishments. During the years she 
has kept in touch with the relatives of Fidelis Kent Stone. 

From Miss Smith comes the information that the last remaining daughter of 
Father Fidelis — Madame de Casotte — died about a year ago in Switzerland. A 
son of hers, a Captain in the French Army, achieved considerable distinction 
during the World War II. A grandson (great-grandson of Fr. Fidelis) has recent- 
ly entered the Trappists, in Europe. 

It is interesting to see how the great fruits of the conversion of Father Fi- 
delis are still being multiplied. In his life there was certainly a strong "chain- 
reaction" of grace! 







THE PASSIONIST 






^ctend<i Aifmpatkif, sta 


Rev. 


Fr. 


Terence (Powers), C.P., on the death of his Father. 


Rev. 


Fr. 


Germain (Legere), C.P., on the death of his Father. 
R.I. P. 



104 



A Review of 1950's Magazines 



[VOTES ON THE PASSION IN 1950 

by 
Rev. Fr. Roger, C. P. 



EACH YEAR the Catholic Press 
issues a vast number of perio- 
dicals touching upon practically ev- 
ery phase of Catholic life. One 
comes across many articles and 
studies of special interest to Pas- 
sionists — incidents in the Passion, 
suggestions for sermons, explana- 
tions of dogmas, inspirations for 
meditation. 

Unfortunately most of us do not 
have time to read all these periodi- 
cals. We cannot profit by this 
wealth of Passion material arriving 
at the Monastery mail-box week 
after week. To remedy this defect, 
we intend to furnish the readers of 
The Passionist a summary of the 
more important Passion articles 
during the past year. 
For your sermon. . . . 

We are always glad to get new 
suggestions for our sermons. Bish- 
op Noll offers a new approach for 
a Passion Sunday sermon in the 
Priest (p. 218-220) l For the same 
Sunday Father Sullivan, O.P., 
writes a talk called "Covered 
Minds" to be found in The HomiU 
etic and Pastoral Review (v. 50, 
455-457). Father Crock gives ser- 



mon outlines for Palm Sunday and 
Good Friday in the same volume of 
the Homiletic (541-546). His Good 
Friday sermon depicts the part of 
sin in the Crucifixion. 

Some of the devotional articles 
of the year may also prove helpful 
in preaching. Father Gerard Roon- 
ey, C.P., of the East, described the 
three Crosses of Calvary for The 
Sign. "The Cross of God's Justice" 
discussed the bad thief (Feb. 63- 
64), while "The Cross of God's 
Mercy" referred to the good thief 
(Mar. 47-48). The last article, 
"God's Cross" treated of Christ 
(Apr. 49-50). In line with this sub- 
ject was a selection from St. John 
Chrysostom in the Orate Fratres 
"The Cross and the Good Thief" 
(Apr. 193-199). 

Judas was again represented in 
current Passion literature. Father 
Sheerin, C.S.P., wrote of spiritual 
darkness with Judas as the example 
in "Now It Was Night" (Homiletic, 
v. 50, 507-510). The Catholic Di- 
gest for May contained a summary 
of an article by Alfred O'Rahilly 
(25-27) on Judas. Simon of Cyrene 
was the subject of a descriptive nar- 



i All references are to L950 numbers of the various periodicals, [f there an- two volumes For 
the one year, we will Jfive the volume number also. Otherwise, there will bo only page refer- 
ences. 



10.-) 



rative by B. Francis in the Ave 
Maria. The title was "Lesser Fig- 
ures of the Passion" (v. 71, 337- 
340 ). 2 Mary Magdalen featured in 
a little poem in The Sign (Apr. 64), 
by Sister Mary Enda. Father C. A. 
Herbst, S.J. writes on "Conformity 
with Christ in His Suffering" in the 
Review for Religious (v. 9, 119- 
124), a meditative study of our life 
with Christ Crucified. 

A Carthusian Monk wrote two 
long and well written articles for 
The Cross and Crown. The first 
dealt with "The Love of Christ and 
Its Rejection" (47-57), while the 
second developed the same theme 
under the title "But They Said, 
Barabbas" (184-198). "Lessons 
from the Cross" were drawn by 
E. Finnegan in the Ave Maria 
(71, 407-408). Sister M. Philip 
treated of "The Seven Last Words 
of Christ, A Unit in Religion" for 
the Catholic School Journal (92-95). 

As a conclusion for this section 
of Passion Notes as well as for your 
next Passion sermon, we recom- 
mend a little poem "Calvary" by M. 
Schoeverling in the Sign (March 
61). 

The deeper side. . . . 

Passing over from sermons to 
dogma, we cannot help mentioning 
a criticism of sermons made by Fa- 
ther McGouley, C.SS.R. for the 
Priest (125-126). The writer de- 
plores the "false notion of the 



atonement" sometimes found in ser- 
mons or spiritual reading books. 
To make God the Father a divine 
"ogre who finds delight in the ag- 
ony of the victim he devours" is 
for Father McGouley "A Horrible 
Doctrine." 

Father David, O.F.M. Cap. begins 
his study, "The Idea of Substitu- 
tion in the Doctrine of the Redemp- 
tion" with a similar criticism of 
certain preachers. But he enters 
upon a very interesting study of 
the dogma of Redemption, which 
runs for three issues of the Irish 
Ecclesiastical Record (73, 116-128, 
243-250, 331-343). 3 In the first sec- 
tion he takes up the Protestant 
exaggerations of this dogma, and 
then turns to the idea of vicarious 
substitution, as formulated by St. 
Paul. His analysis of key Pauline 
passages is directed chiefly against 
Prat's interpretation. Father Da- 
vid finds no difficulty in the concept 
of "Vicarious substitution" which 
Prat wished to abandon in favor of 
the principle of "solidarity." In the 
two following parts of his study, 
Father David takes up the fitting- 
ness of redemption by means of 
satisfaction. He concludes that God 
was not "cruel" in exacting satis- 
faction from Christ, but that in 
this way He showed not only his 
Mercy, but also His Divine Justice." 

At the 1950 meeting of the Cath- 
olic Theological Society of Ameri- 
ca, held at Washington, Father Au- 



2 We did not see the second number of this article (366-369). 

3 The second and third installments are entitled "Vicarious Substitution and Reason. 



106 



gustine Paul Hennessy, C.P., of the 
East, led an interesting discussion 
on "Christian Maturity in Clerical 
Life." As a remedy for clerical im- 
maturity, Father Augustine Paul 
stressed the "Centrality of Christ 
Crucified in the integration of Sac- 
red Wisdom." He maintained that 
"we should be able to integrate the 
sacred wisdom we are attempting 
to teach our students by constantly 
centering each tract of theology 
around Christ Crucified," for 
"Christ Crucified stands at the 
very heart of God's revelation of 
Himself to mankind and conse- 
quently the various tracts of theo- 
logy can be best integrated by tying 
them together around the central 
truth of redemption" (Proceedings 
of Fifth Annual Meeting, 1950, p. 
159-179, esp. 177-179). 

It was to be expected that in this 
"Year of the Assumption" Mary's 
part in our Redemption would be 
studied anew. Father Michel in 
the American Ecclesiastical Review 
offered one side of this much de- 
bated question in an article "Mary's 
Co-Redemption" (v. 122, 183-192). 
Father Michel holds that Mary's 
part in objective redemption was 
"indirect and mediate." 

Father Boyer, S.J. a few months 
later presented the other side of the 
question in "Thoughts on Mary's 
Co-Redemption" (401-415). Fa- 
ther Boyer maintains that her part 
was "real and immediate, albeit 
conjoined, participated and secon- 
dary." 



The Franciscan Father Carol, 
President of the American Mariolo- 
gy Society, wrote against Michel in 
"Problems of Our Lady's Core- 
demption' (123, 32-51). In this 
article Father Carol questioned the 
very terminology of "objective and 
subjective" redemption introduced 
by Lennerz, in 1935. 

And so the controversy on "Co- 
redemption" ended for the time 
being in the pages of the Ecclesias- 
tical Review. Auguste Ferland, S.S. 
avoided it in his devotional article 
"The Marian Character of Redemp- 
tion" (v. 123, 175-179). 

During the year a vast amount of 
Marian Literature appeared, which 
we cannot summarize here without 
going beyond the limits set us in 
these Passion Notes. But we do 
want to call your attention to an 
excellent study in The Thomist by 
Father M. Llameras, O.P., on "Fa- 
tima: the Rosary and the Heart of 
Mary" (453-527). 

The relationship of the Mass to 
Calvary was treated in a popular 
manner for the Sign by Richard 
Kugelman of the East, "Crucified 
with Christ" (July, 59-60.) A more 
doctrinal aspect was taken up by 
Father Brosnan in the Irish Ec. 
Rec. (v. 72, 38-45) under the title 
"Immolation." 

Father Ellard, S.J., the liturgist, 
studied the offertory antiphon for 
the Mass of the Holy Cross in Theo- 
logical Studies, "Devotion to the 
Holy Cross and a Dislocated Mass- 
text" (333-355). Anyone interest- 



107 



ed in tracing the history of devo- 
tion to the Passion will find Father 
Ellard's study very important. 

And the Sacred Text. . . . 

Mention was made earlier in 
these Passion Notes of the seven 
words of Our Lord on the Cross. 
Father Leloir, O.S.B., chose the 
Second Word for discussion in the 
Verbum Domini (373-380). He 
drew many lessons from this word 
by means of judicious accommoda- 
tion of such scriptural passages 
as Mt. 10:12, James 4:3, and Mt. 
6:22. You will find these texts 
very apt for your sermon on the 
Second Word. 

Father John J. Collins wrote an 
interesting article for the Catholic 
Biblical Quarterly on "The Cruci- 
fixion of Our Lord and Some Medi- 
cal Data" (171-172). He shows that 
the use of one nail to fasten both 
feet is possible, but, he maintains, 
less probable. Furthermore he says 
the medical data does not permit us 
to say Our Lord died of a "broken 
heart" as we sometimes read. He 
adds that the flow of blood and 
water from the side of Jesus is 
more certainly miraculous, as it is 
not possible to pierce the "pericar- 
dial sinus" without breaking a bone, 
and this last is ruled out by John 
19:36. 

Father Crehan, S.J. offers an his- 
torical study of Origen's interpreta- 
tion of John 20:17 in Theological 
Studies (368-373), entitled, "The 



Dialektos of Origen and John 20: 
17." 

According to the rubrics. . . . 

Several liturgical or rubrical 
questions, relative to the Passion, 
were dealt with this year. Father 
Lallou discussed the position of the 
cross on the chasuble in the Ec. 
Rev. (v. 122, 465-466), and at the 
same time said that a wooden cross 
was not absolutely required for 
Good Friday unveiling (466). Fa- 
ther Connell, C.SS.R. in the same 
periodical holds that Viaticum may 
be received on Good Friday, even 
though it was received the preced- 
ing day, as long as the danger of 
death remains (v. 123, 460). 

In the Clergy Review Canon Ma- 
honey takes up the question why 
Mass is not celebrated on Good Fri- 
day (v. 33, 181-183). He points out 
that the ancients did not think it 
proper to celebrate Mass, a joyous 
service, on a day of fasting and 
penance. G. Montague in the Irish 
Ec. Rec. discusses the Holy Week 
services according to the Memori- 
al Rituum (v. 73, 552-554). He 
also suggests ways of making these 
services better appreciated by the 
faithful. 

From here and there. . . . 

Last May, before re-entering 
the service, Father Cyril Jablonov- 
sky, C.P. detailed "God's Master 
Plan" in the Sign (27-28) ... The 
Catholic Digest summarized a de- 
scription of the Passion Play at 



108 



Oberammergau in its May issue 
(70-73) ... In July the same Digest 
gave an account of the "Sanctuary 
for the Great Chalice" (28-30), the 
so-called Chalice of Antioch, pur- 
ported to be the one used by Christ 
at the Last Supper ... In August 
the Sign gave us many satires and 
phantasies about the Passion in an 
article "Legends of the Cross" by 
Gwendoline Miller and Elizabeth 
Murphy Nydiggen (40-41). Father 
O'Carroll described a new religious 
group for the readers of the Irish 
Ec. Rec. (v. 73, 497-505), called 
"The Institute of Jesus Crucified." 
The Institute is composed of sick 
and infirm members. Its purpose 
is "to help make expiation for the 
sins of the world by continuing, 
through the sufferings of its mem- 
bers, the work of Redemption begun 
on the Cross." Founded in 1930, it 
is still confined to its mother coun- 
try, France. Its progress should be 



of especial interest to Passionists. 
However, of greater interest to 
every Passionist last year was the 
canonization of our own Saint Vin- 
cent Mary, C.P. Gretta Palmer in a 
somewhat disappointing manner 
took the occasion to write an ac- 
count of his life for the readers of 
the Sign under title, "Martyr for 
a Pope" (June, 11-14). As a spe- 
cial jubilee touch Barret McGurn 
described "The Passionist Head- 
quarters" in Rome in an article en- 
riched with pictures for the July 
number of the Sign (33-35). 

And now a request. . . . 

Thus we end our Passion Notes, 
1950. In order to make them more 
complete for 1951, we ask the co- 
operation of our readers, whether 
in this country or abroad. Refer- 
ences to Passion articles, together 
with brief summaries of the con- 
tents, will be greatly appreciated. 






COVER PICTURE 

We were privileged to be able to publish, for the first time, this picture of 
the Immaculate Heart of Mary, Feast August 22. Unfortunately, a straight 
photo does not do full justice to the beautiful coloring of the original. It was 
painted by Mr. R. A. Rodgers of Bowling Green, Kentucky. 



109 



Special MiMton, Qt/akh 

IN THE DIOCESE OF LITTLE ROCK 



DURING thi* past year (1950) 
several of our Missionaries 
were privileged to conduct missions 
in various Cities and Towns in the 
State of Arkansas. These missions 
were charity missions scheduled for 
the benefit of the small parishes 
of the Diocese of Little Rock. A 
brief summary of this mission en- 
deavor during the Holy Year will 
be of real interest to all the Pro- 
vince. 

In February, 1950, Very Rev- 
erend Father Provincial wrote to 
His Excellency, Most Reverend Al- 
bert L. Fletcher, D.D. of the Dio- 
cese of Little Rock, asking his ad- 
vice on a proposal that a series of 
free missions be arranged for the 
spiritual benefit of the smaller 
and more needy parishes of the 
Diocese. A letter of reply was re- 
ceived within a few days in which 
His Excellency gratefully approved 
of this project. 

The two letters of Bishop Fletch- 
er are of revealing interest to a mis- 
sion minded Congregation in as 
much as they lay bare a wide field 
of mission effort. The letter of 
reply on the part of Bishop Fletch- 
er is as follows : 

110 



Dear Father Provincial : 

I certainly appreciate the very 
generous and most helpful offer con- 
tained in your kind letter of Febru- 
ary 19th. Missions in the little 
parishes and even some of the mis- 
sions will be a wonderful spiritual 
help to the people as well as to the 
pastors. 

I am really ashamed to mention 
all the small places, parishes and 
missions, which I believe have nev- 
er, or at least in a very long time, 
had a mission. I am, nevertheless, 
giving you the following rather 
complete list together with certain 
comments. ... (A list of parishes 
and missions follows in which 
Bishop Fletcher judges a mission 
would be beneficial) 

I really feel sort of proud of al- 
most all of these missions in small 
parishes. Proportionally they sacri- 
fice a great deal more for the 
Church than larger places. Some of 
them have recently built mission 
churches. Wynne has recently built 
a brick and tile school. Most all of 
them have a real esprit de corps. 
I feel sure that a mission would do 
them a wonderful lot of good be- 
cause of their dispositions. 

Several of the little places have 
public schools taught by the Sis- 



ters. I feel quite certain that even- 
tually we will lose all of these. But 
we own the property on which these 
schools are located. A big problem 
now, which I believe a good mis- 
sion can help solve, is to build up 
the spirit of sacrifice in these peo- 
ple so that if and when they lose 
the state support for these schools, 
they will make the sacrifice to op- 
erate them as parochial schools. 
During the next few years this 
program of education will be one 
of the primary duties of priests in 
charge of these places. If any of 
the pastors of these places ask for a 
mission I would appreciate it if 
you would let me know so that I 
can acquaint the Missionary with 
the program I have in mind so that 
he can help along some. 

This letter is certainly too long. 
I hope that you will pardon me for 
taking up so much of your time. 
I do appreciate the wonderful offer 
contained in your letter and I feel 
sure that the priests in the above 
mentioned places will be interested. 
I shall be glad to learn from you 
the reaction you receive from per- 
sonal inquiries addressed to the 
priests. 

Your great generosity in offer- 
ing to help us during the Holy Year 
on these small missions and parish- 
es will, I know, return to you and 
the Missionaries a thousandfold in 
blessings from the Good Lord. 

If there should be any other in- 
formation which I overlooked in 
which you or the Missionaries con- 



cerned may be interested, please do 
not hesitate to write me. 

Assuring you again of my very 
deep appreciation of your great 
generosity and help to us, I am, 
with the kindest of greetings and 
good wishes, 

Yours sincerely in Christ, 

Albert L. Fletcher, D.D. 

Bishop of Little Rock 

The response of the various pas- 
tors was most satisfactory. Some 
twenty out of the twenty eight rec- 
ommended by the Bishop wrote im- 
mediately accepting the mission of- 
fer and indicating their willingness 
to have the mission at any date con- 
venient to the Missionaries. One 
pastor, not included on the Bishop's 
list, wrote in asking that his mis- 
sion churches might share in the 
program. This pastor suggested a 
mission collection, as did some of 
the others, to defray the mission- 
aries' expenses. He conceded that 
the collection would not be of much 
help by indicating that the Christ- 
mas Collection had totaled eight 
dollars. Two extracts from the 
many thankful letters of the pas- 
tors give an indication of the great 
need that these missions were des- 
tined to realize. 

One pastor wrote: "I would like 
to say that I feel certain that a 
mission will be of great spiritual 
benefit to the Church and also to a 
few non-Catholics who are interest- 
ed in the church. Although a mis- 
sion has been wanting, our finan- 



111 



cial condition would not afford us 
the opportunity. It looks like your 
offer to conduct a mission without 
remuneration has been an answer 
to my problem and my prayers." 
Another pastor wrote : "Of course 
I hardly would trust my eyes when 
I read your offer to conduct a mis- 
sion free of all charge. The con- 
gregation is small, so are their 
means. . . ." 

When Bishop Fletcher learned 
that it was Father Provincial's in- 
tention to contact each of the pas- 
tors mentioned in his letter, he 
immediately sent the following 
communication. 

Dear Father Provincial: 

I have been delayed in writing to 
acknowledge and thank you for 
your kind letter of March 8th. I 
really felt ashamed to send you that 
long list of our missions and small 
parishes. Of course, I do not want 
you to think that all of these will be 
able to accept your very kind and 
gracious offer. Such a burden 
would be too much for your Mis- 
sionary Fathers to undertake with- 
in the next year. 

But I thought that I would send 
you a pretty complete list so that 
you and the Fathers could take 
your choice. That was also my rea- 
son for adding a few comments 
which might enable you to con- 
tact the priests in charge of those 
which seemed to need a mission 
most. Thanking you again for your 
great kindness and help and as- 

112 



suring you of my very deep appre- 
ciation, I am, 

Sincerely in Christ, 

Albert L. Fletcher, D.D. 
Bishop of Little Rock. 
A total of twenty five missions 
were scheduled. One pastor found 
it necessary to postpone the mis- 
sion until a later date. Two pas- 
tors, namely those in charge of the 
parishes of Brinkley and Forrest 
City, insisted that the Parishes 
could afford to pay the missionary 
though their mission churches could 
not do so. This mission program, 
therefore, resulted in twenty four 
missions being conducted. Twenty 
two of these missions were given 
gratis. 

The missions were scheduled at 
the following places and were given 
by the following missionaries. 
Magnolia and mission church: 

Father Flannon, C.P. 
Van Buren and mission church : 

Father Henry, C.P. 
Sheridan : Father Wilfrid, C.P. 
Barling: Father Wilfrid, C.P. 

Searcy: Father Flannon, C.P. 

Warren : Father Leo Patrick, C.P. 
Brinkley and mission church: 

Father Henry, C.P. 
Forrest City and mission church : 

Father Flannon, C.P. 
Bigelow and mission church: 

Father Wilfrid, C.P. 
Crawfordville : Father Brendan,C.P. 
New Blaine : Father Daniel, C.P. 
Scranton: Father Daniel, C.P. 

Prairie View: Father Daniel, C.P. 
Ratcliff: Father Bertrand, C.P. 






Morrison Bluff: 

Father Bertrand, C.P. 
Clarksville and mission church: 

Father Daniel, C.P. 
Center Ridge : Father Wilfrid, C.P. 
Carlisle: Father Wilfrid, C.P. 

Upon the completion of this se- 
ries of missions, Bishop Fletcher 
wrote a letter of appreciation to 
each of the missionaries and also 
addressed the following letter to 
Father Provincial. 

Dear Father Provincial : 

Although I have been very much 
delayed in doing so, I am writing 
today a little note of thanks to all 
those fine missionaries who gave 
twenty five missions in little out- 
places throughout the Diocese this 
year. Herewith I enclose copies of 
letters which I am writing to each 
of them. 

It is to you that I am particularly 
grateful for making these missions 
to scattered groups of Catholics 
possible. When accepting your 
kind offer and when supplying you 
with that long list of missions, I 
was not presumptuous enough to 
expect that you and your good Fa- 
thers would be able to take care of 
all of them. But that is exactly 
what you did. 

Not only did you take care of 
them but they were absolute gifts 
which even the poorest and smal- 
lest of the missions could afford to 
accept. 

The only way that I can, at least 
partially repay you for this great 



Holy Year gift to the Diocese, is 
by asking the Good Lord regularly 
in my Mass to pay this debt of 
gratitude for me. I wish to assure 
you of my very deep appreciation 
and hope that some day in some 
way I will have the opportunity to 
express my gratitude not only in 
word but also in deed. 

As I tried to tell the different 
Fathers, every single mission they 
gave seemed to bring with it un- 
expected blessings. These missions 
have brought and will continue to 
bring wonderful results. 

I hope that you will let me know 
if there might be something that I 
can do in return to repay, at least 
partially, the great favor which 
you and your Fathers have so gen- 
erously done us during the Holy 
Year of 1950. 

Hoping for a remembrance in 
your prayers and promising a spe- 
cial memento of you and your in- 
tentions in my Masses, and with 
renewed sentiments of deepest 
gratitude as well as with very 
best wishes for every blessing of 
the New Year, I am, 

Sincerely in Christ, 

Albert L. Fletcher, D.D. 
Bishop of Little Rock. 

The Missionary Fathers who 
were engaged in this work share 
with Bishop Fletcher and all of 
us the conviction that not the least 
benefit of these missions will be the 
blessings of God upon our beloved 
Congregation. 



113 



I am- sure that all will be inter- 
ested to know that a continuation 
of this type of work is being 
planned now. In the Diocese of 
Oklahoma, missions have been 
scheduled (some have already been 
given) in the following places: 
Idabel, Durant, Buffalo and Shat- 
tuck. In the Diocese of Austin, a 
mission has been scheduled for 
Mexia and arrangements are pend- 
ing for several other missions of 
this type in this Diocese. Various 
other missions and retreats have 



likewise been given on an individ- 
ual basis to needy parishes and re- 
ligious institutions. These have 
not been listed here because of their 
individual nature. This is an esti- 
mate of the good work that can be 
accomplished on a Diocesan basis 
without a diminution of regular 
mission activity. The reading of 
this listing of, mission work on a 
charity basis should be a real in- 
spiration to all and should further 
our special work in the Church. 




Suffer and be silent ; this is the short-cut to holiness and perfection. (Letters, 
II, 736) He who can suffer in silence and in peace is nearly perfect. (Ibid.) 
Work, suffer, be silent and do not complain: these are the axioms of the saints, 
axioms of the highest perfection. (Ibid., 309) 



God wants you to be holy. Waste no time; embrace every occasion that the 
Lord presents to you. 

(Letters, II, 23) 



114 



•; IN VALLE QUISQUIS ASPERA* 

IJ] When troubles weigh upon your soul, 

N When trials and cares beset your way, 

% Lift up your heart, invoke Saint Paul: 

r "Oh, intercede for us, we pray." 

% 

S The many wonders wrought by him 

\ At every time, in every place 

J Proclaim the merits and the pow'r 

% Of Him whose soul was strong with grace. 

Jj The very name of this great Saint 

N Will cause all demons fear and dread, 

% Will loosen Satan's evil grasp 

c And set his victims free instead. 

S 

J Invoke him, you who are infirm; 

\ Your illness soon will be allayed. 

^ For even tempests, rains and floods 

S Have his commanding voice obeyed. 

^ God's Angels walked with him on earth, 

S Through every danger led his way; 

% Celestial voices spoke to him 

( And taught him fervent words to say. 

% O father, who art our ideal 

% Of gracious love and tenderness, 

5[ Shed holy light upon our minds, 

S With grace and strength our efforts bless. 

^ Through thee may Faith and Light and Love — 

5 God's blessings — flow upon our soul; 

S Protect our Church, our native land, 

5 , And draw us to our heav'nly goal. 



All power, glory, love and praise 

To Thee, O God, great Trinity, 

Who deigned to lead this faithful soul 



S To contemplate Thy Deity. 

? Amen. 

v 

( * Translation of the Hymn for Lauds, for the Feast of St. Paul of the 
J Cross, April 28. 



HEALTH 





and the 

PflSSIOOIST DIET 

By 

feiotkesi £imcm Mcvuf, Q. P. 

IV. NUTRITION ANP THE 
PASSIONIST BROTHER 

THE HEALTH of a community 
and consequently its happiness 
is, to a great extent, in the hands 
of the Brother Cook. Almost every- 
one has been conscious of this fact 
throughout the years. But now 
through the medium of modern nu- 
trition the importance of the fact 
is considerably magnified. Yes, 
there is more involved in the pro- 
cess of feeding the brethren than 
just satisfying the "eye and stom- 
ach." The cook is the protector and 
dispenser of the precious nutrition- 
al elements contained in the food 
he works with. In view of this seri- 
ous responsibility it is well that 
those in charge of our food ser- 
vice, whether religious or lay, be 
well informed in this matter. 



This is the third in a series of articles 
by Brother Simon Mary, C.P., of the 
Province of St. Paul of the Cross. A 
final article will treat of diets, their place 
and treatment as drawn from the words 
of Our Holy Founder. 



The Brothers must not only keep 
the health of the brethren at heart, 
but they must also keep a diligent 
watch over the goods of the mon- 
astery. In the Holy Rule we read: 
'Let them (Brothers) have a dili- 
gent care over the property of the 
Congregation and consider it as be- 
longing to God. Let them remem- 
ber that it is placed under their 
fcare and that, if through their 
fault, it be either destroyed or de- 
teriorated, they will have to render 
to God a severe account for it." Ch. 
XX.169. The Brother is to see that 
nothing is destroyed or deteriorat- 
ed. This can easily happen in the 
preparation of foodstuffs which are 
so delicate and perishable. Modern 
nutrition points out that through 
the years improper preparation of 
foods has resulted in the loss of 
their nutritive value and conse- 
quent deterioration because of that 
loss. It is well then to see what 
the Passionist Brothers' role is in 
regard to applying better nutrition- 
al practices to the meal prepara- 
tion. This necessitates descending 
to details, but that need not detract 
from the importance of the matter 
at hand. St. Paul of the Cross did 
not hesitate to stoop to details con- 



116 



cerning the serious problem of 
feeding his religious. 

Properly Prepared Foods 

One of the main concerns of our 
Holy Founder was that the foods 
served the brethren be "properly 
prepared." In the article "Nutri- 
tion and the Passionist Diet," it 
was stated that requisite nourish- 
ment is more dependent upon pro- 
per preparation than upon any oth- 
er factor. At the same time it was 
also said that, considered in the 
light of present-day nutritional 
practices, our food preparation, es- 
pecially vegetables, has been at 
fault and there is room for im- 
provement. Let us see why this is 
so. 

Faulty Preparation 

According to present high stan- 
dards of nutrition, faulty food pre- 
paration is not due to just one iso- 
lated mistake. It comprises a group 
of errors anyone of which can ad- 
versely effect the value of the food. 
The following list of common er- 
rors pertains mostly to fresh pro- 
duce because of its delicate composi- 
tion. 

1. Improper storage. All perishable 
food lose appreciable amounts 
of food value through lack of 
sufficient refrigeration. 

2. Buying too large quantities of 
perishable items even though 
they are kept under good refrig- 
eration. Produce begins to de- 
teriorate from the moment it is 
taken from the soil. I 



3. Lack of sufficient care in imme- 
diate preparation of foods for 
cooking. The deposit of mineral 
salts found directly beneath the 
skin of certain vegetables, es- 
pecially potatoes and carrots, is 
lost when too much is removed 
by peeling. To allow vegetables 
to soak in water longer than is 
necessary to wash them, is like- 
wise injurious for it tends to 
dissolve out some of the nutri- 
ents. 

4. Incorrect methods of cooking. 

(1) Cooking in excessive a- 
mounts of water and then 
discarding the water con- 
taining a goodly portion of 
the water-soluble nutrients. 

(2) Using baking soda (b-carb) 
in cooking water to keep 
the color in green vegeta- 
bles. 

(3) Overcooking or cooking be- 
yond doneness stage. This 
is very detrimental to foods. 

(4) Having vegetables cooked 
considerably ahead of the 
serving time. It is more 
harmful still if they are al- 
lowed to stand in the water 
or receive excessive heat to 
keep them hot. 

These are some of the errors in 
food preparation, particularly vege- 
tables, that have been characteristic 
of American cooking, including our 
own, until the advent of our pres- 
ent-day nutritional standards. 



117 



Properly Prepared Foods 

An eminent authority in the field 
of nutrition has this to say about 
food preparation : — "Good food pre- 
paration conserves the nutritive 
value of the food, increasing its di- 
gestibility, develops and enhances 
its flavor and palatability, increases 
or at least does not detract from the 
attractiveness of its original color, 
form and texture, and frees food 
from injurious organisms and sub- 
stances." At first glance the defini- 
tion seems to be made up of sepa- 
rate divisions. But on close analy- 
sis this is not found to be so. The 
first phrase, "conserves the nutri- 
tive value of the food," is the sub- 
stance of the definition and all that 
follows is but an enlargement of the 
same. Because when a food is so 
prepared that there is a minimum 
loss of the nutritive value, that food 
will fulfill all the other aspects of 
the requirements for "good prepa- 
ration." 

For example, a food so prepared 
will retain much of its original col- 
or, form, and texture ; its flavor and 
palatability will be enhanced; and 
injurious organisms and substances 
will be satisfactorily removed. Fur- 
thermore this will serve to increase 
the digestibility of the food. The 
body's efficiency in utilizing the nu- 
trients supplied to it, is largely de- 
termined by the thorougness with 
which it digests its food. Good 
digestion of food is intimately con- 
nected with the appearance and 
taste of the food, But appearance 



and taste can be deceptive. By 
this is meant that it is quite possi- 
ble to serve attractive and palatable 
foods that have lost a lot of their 
nutritional value. This can be done 
by so-called artificial means; using 
well-seasoned sauces or garnishes 
and by retaining the green color 
through the use of baking soda. 
Therefore good appearance and 
taste do not necessarily mean foods 
that will provide maximum nour- 
ishment ; but nutritionally-good 
foods will, always be attractive and 
palatable, presuming of course that 
the cook gives the necessary atten- 
tion to the seasoning of the food. 

Rules For Proper Preparation 

Technical knowledge is not a 
requisite in order that a cook may 
serve nutritious food. It is also evi- 
dent that the elimination of the 
errors listed above demands no ex- 
ceptional ability on his part. The 
same holds true for applying the 
rules of "proper preparation" to 
the meal service. 

1. Cook vegetables by one of the 
following methods which are 
listed according to their import- 
ance. 

(1) Steam pressure cooker 

(2) In vapor (over water) in a 
double boiler with a perfor- 
ated insert. 

(3) In as little water as possible 
so there will be very little 
liquid remaining after the 
food is cooked. 



118 



2. Cook foods just to the doneness 
stage. Drain and keep hot. 

3. Cook as close to serving time as 
possible. 

4. Save liquor from vegetables that 
do not have a sharp flavor, nor 
the color of which would pro- 
hibit using the liquor in stock, 
soups, or sauces. 

5. Keep cooking utensils well cov- 
ered during cooking process. 
Cooking in presence of oxygen 
has harmful effect on some nu- 
trients. 

6. Never add baking soda (bi-carb) 
to vegetables to keep them green. 
Some vitamins are acid in their 
makeup and the alkali neutral- 
izes the vitamins. 

7. For flavor and economy cook 
roasts at low temperatures 
(280°) for a longer period of 
time than it takes at higher 
temperatures. This decreases 
shrinkage and preserves flavor. 
High temperature toughens pro- 
tein as is observed in the over- 
cooked egg white. 

Surprising as it may seem one 
has only to follow these simple 
rules in order to produce food 
which will retain the maximum 
amount of nutritive value. How- 
ever, even after these rules have 
been faithfully applied the Brother 
Cook is still confronted with the 
problem of getting the Brethren 
.o eat this nutritious food which 
le has prepared. The solution of 
-his problem lies in the planning 



of well-balanced food combinations 
the importance of which has come 
to light in recent years. 

Balanced Meals 

Meals are said to be well-bal- 
anced when they provide all the nu- 
tritive elements needed for requis- 
ite nourishment in correct propor- 
tions. The elements referred to are 
protein (meat, fish, eggs, cheese) ; 
carbohydrates (starches and sug- 
ar) ; fats, butter, oils, meat fats, 
fried foods) ; vitamins, mineral 
salts, and fiber (lighter vegetables, 
fresh fruits, salads, cole slaw, milk, 
and whole grains). All this may 
seem to be very technical and diffi- 
cult to apply but really it is not. 
Here is the reason. Protein foods 
being the nucleus of our meals 
takes care of itself in our diet. All 
one has to do then is to see that 
there is a correct proportion be- 
tween the starchy foods and the 
lighter vegetables, and the fats. 
The error frequently made in the 
past was to serve meals that con- 
tained too much starch or fat or 
both. This mistake is easily cor- 
rected by giving it just a little 
thought. 

1. Become acquainted with the 
starchy foods: rice, noodles, 
macaroni, dried legumes, corn, 
potatoes and the like. 

2. Do not use two of these at the 
same meal, but combine one 
with a lighter vegetable served 
without a thickened sauce. 



119 



3. Keep the salads light. If they 
are consistantly heavy and rich, 
they defeat their purpose. 

4. Serve citrus fruits frequently. 

5. Use only moderate amounts of 
fried and fatty foods. A little 
fat goes a long way. Too much 
taxes the digestive system. 

Balanced meals are as simple as 
that but the effects are manifold be- 
cause they assure requisite nour- 
ishment for all. 

Attractive Meals 

The final touch to "properly-pre- 
pared" food and "well-balanced" 
meals is to have them as attractive 
as possible. The planning of at- 
tractive food combinations with 
their proper service not only goes 
to make an enjoyable meal but it is 
also an essential part of a well- 
ordered nutritional policy. It is 
also true that attractiveness and 
the aroma of foods is an aid to good 
digestion which in turn is neces- 
sary for the utilization of the nu- 
tritional elements furnished by the 
food. To increase the attractive- 
ness and effectiveness of foods: 

1. Have a variety in color and form 
of foods. 

2. Have a good balance between 
soft and solid foods. 

3. Do not repeat the same food in 
a meal such as tomato soup and 
tomato salad. 

4. Do not serve more than one 
sharp-flavored food at a meal; 



this applies particularly to the 
cabbage family. 

5. Avoid monotony of color in any 
one meal. 

6. Do not use the same food con- 
stantly from day to day nor 
serve certain foods on specific 
days of the week. 

7. Always serve hot things "hot" 
and cold things "cold." 

To sum up what has been said: 
in order to consistently serve meals 
that will provide the nourishment 
conducive to normal health and 
economically at the same time to 
realize the maximum on the mer- 
chandise purchased, the foodstuffs 
must be "properly prepared," "well 
balanced," and "attractively com- 
bined." The first two requirements 
have to do with the scientific and 
the latter with the artistic in food 



service. 



Conclusion 



Modern nutrition has greatly ele- 
vated meal preparation from the 
realm of a possible monotonous 
routine to that of an art and sci- 
ence. This should serve to encour- 
age the Brother Cook or the Super- 
visor if the cook happens to be a 
layman. It is well to keep in mind 
that no other office offers such 
opportunity for creative ability. It 
need only be remarked that one 
does not have to resort to extrava- 
gance in order to exercise this abili- 
ty. Just the opposite is true. 

The life of a Passionist Brother 
is truly a hidden life, which de- 



120 



mands a spirit of deep faith. This 
is particularly applicable to the 
Brother Cook who is striving day 
after day to protect the health of 
the brethren by faithfully apply- 
ing the sound principles of nutri- 
tion to his work. The nervous ten- 
sion associated with kitchen man- 
agement added to the physical 
strain makes this task a difficult 
one. There is bound to be subjec- 
tive criticism of foods and meals 
because experience proves it is im- 
possible to please everyone, no mat- 
ter how nutritious and appealing 
the meals are. The more knowledge 
one has of his work and the more 
knowledge, the less danger there is 
for discouragement because of un- 
founded criticisms. He is certain 
before God that he is not only do- 
ing his very best, but his best is 
founded on the rock of solid prin- 
ciples of good nutrition. This should 
be a source of peace and joy in 
God's service. 



There is no better way to con- 
clude this article than to repeat 
the graphic words of our Holy 
Founder himself; — "Don't be sur- 
prised that I stoop to these details ; 
God makes me keep the thing at 
heart. Believe me, from the main- 
tenance of vigor, particularly a- 
mong young people, follows an 
augmentation of the spirit of ob- 
servance, fervor, etc .... I have 
acquired thence the firm certitude 
that if religious, — if not all, at 
least the majority, — don't receive 
nourishment proportioned to their 
need, (according to the rules) with 
discretion, strong temptations come 
to them, religious life becomes a 
burden and engenders weariness 
and melancholy .... God inspires 
me to insist on this point: lose 
health, lose the observance ; that is 
why I have requisite nourishment 
given them. Take good care of the 
health of the young; it is ruined 
very quickly." 




121 



An Outline for Passionists 




ca 



IZ~Z] 



A previous article treated of the prayer 
of faith as taught hy our Holy Founder. Es- 
sentially this form of prayer consists in 
remaining lovingly attentive to God, present 
immediately to the soul. This attention is 
based, not on any feeling of God's presence, 
nor on any activity of the imagination, nor 
on involved reasoning, but simply on the 
soul's knowledge, by faith, that God is present 
within and about it. The principal signs 
whereby it might be known that a soul should 
be making this type of prayer are : 1 ) aridity 
and the inability to make any other kind of 
prayer ; 2 ) the desire of the soul to give 
itself with loving attention to God. 

PRAYER OF FAITH 

(Part Two) 

THE prayer of faith was to the 
mind of our Holy Founder of 
very great importance. It is well 
to devote a second article to a con- 
sideration of this form of prayer. 

To recall to our minds the nature 
of this prayer, we need only read 
a letter of St. Paul of the Cross to 
Teresa Palozzi, who was later to 
become a Passionist Nun. 

"I tell you that a better thing — 
one more pleasing to God — you can- 
not do than to resign yourself in 
everything to His most Holy Will 
and do all for His greater glory, 
as you indicate to me in your letter. 

"Therefore, continue doing this, 
and believe me, you merit more and 
give more pleasure to God, than if 
you had all the highest heavenly 
consolations. When prayer is pur- 
er and despoiled of imaginations, 
and one walks in pure simple faith, 
then prayer is more perfect. So 
when you cannot meditate and dis- 




IS 



course interiorly, stay in the pres- 
ence of God within you, in the tem- 
ple of your soul, and repose as an 
infant on the bosom of the Lord in 
the sacred silence of faith and holy 
love. Oh, if you knew what a great 
form of prayer this is! Accustom 
yourself to this interior recollec- 
tion. Recall that it is a truth of 
faith that God is closer to us than 
we are to ourselves — yes, closer 
than our skin to our body. There- 
fore, lose yourself in God complete- 
ly. Repose on His Divine bosom, 
adore Him, love Him and if you 
cannot speak, it does not matter, 
in fact it is better. I am speaking 
of your present condition, and if 
you try you will find that your soul 
will Obtain more nourishment and 
come to remain in continual prayer, 
always recollected in God. Love lets 
one speak little; it is better ex- 
pressed by silence. One word of 
love is sufficient. Oh Father! Oh 
great Father! Oh Goodness! Oh 
Love! One of these ejaculations is 
enough to keep a loving soul a long 
time in prayer. . . ." (1305) 

This letter reminds us that the 
essential element of the prayer of 
faith is a loving attention to God 
abiding within the soul. This loving 
attention is expressed in various 
ways by our Holy Founder, e.g., 
"Retire completely into the supreme 



122 



part of your spirit and there, enter 
the sanctuary to treat with God in 
spirit and truth." (L.118) "Remain 
in the presence of God, with a pure, 
simple and loving attention to this 
immense Good, in a holy silence of 
love, resting your soul on the lov- 
ing bosom of the Eternal God." (L. 
55). We will see other expressions 
as we continue. 

There were two general counsels 
that our Holy Founder gave for 
thus entering into the presence of 
God. The first was that the soul 
should humble itself as much as 
possible ; the second was that it 
should ordinarily enter into this 
recollection by means of the Pas- 
sion. 

"When you cannot meditate . . . 
act thus. Humble yourself in the 
presence of God, confessing your- 
self to be most unworthy to remain 
in His presence, etc. . . ." (L.1483) 

"Humble yourself exceedingly in 
the Divine Presence; know your 
own nothingness, your capacity, as 
much as is in you, of doing every 
evil, if God did not hold you in His 
arms. In this way hide yourself yet 
more in the Supreme Good. . . ." 
L. 1101) 

"Humbled and concentrated in 
your nothingness, powerlessness, 
indigence and ignorance, yet filled 
with deep filial confidence in our 
Lord, lose yourself completely in 
the abyss of the infinite charity of 
God, Who is a fire of love. In this 
furnace let everything imperfect in 
you be consumed...." (L. 11,724) 



"I would that your preparation 
for holy prayer were a total anni- 
hilation of self before that Sover- 
eign Majesty . . . and then I would 
that in living faith you would cast 
these ashes, this nothingness into 
that true All, which is God and that 
there you would repose . . . etc." 

Our Holy Founder's second point 
of advice is that one should always 
begin one's prayer with some point 
of the Passion. "Always take with 
you to prayer some mystery from 
the life and passion of Jesus Christ, 
and if afterwards the Holy Spirit 
attracts you to a more profound in- 
terior recollection, follow the 
breathing of the Holy Spirit, but 
always by means of the Sacred Pas- 
sion. Thus there will be no illusion 
...." (I, 791) 

"One enters this sacred desert," 
for thus St. Paul spoke of this rec- 
ollection in God, "thru the divine 
gates of the Sacred Wounds of 
Jesus." (L. 1164, 900, etc.) 

"It is best to begin prayer on the 
mysteries of the Sacred Passion, 
for this is the gate." (L. 55) 

"Loaded down with the ropes, 
chains, blows, scourges, wounds, 
thorns, cross and death of my Sa- 
vior, I fly with Him into the Bosom 
of the Divine Father, where the 
sweet Jesus ever remains, and I 
let myself be engulfed entirely in 
His Immense Divinity, and in that 
form I adore, love, etc. ... in the 
sacred silence of faith and holy 
love." (L. 1647) 

Needless to say, the soul, once it 



123 



has turned to the Divinity, will not 
continue recollected unless it helps 
itself by brief acts of faith or love 
or by a brief loving glance at the 
sufferings of Christ. "When your 
mind wanders and distractions 
come, softly revive your faith with 
some loving glance at God and with 
some sweet colloquy upon the Sac- 
red Passion of Jesus Christ and 
then continue your repose in God 
with faith and love." (L. 1101). 
"Do not leave off prayer on account 
of aridity, affliction, etc. Remain 
before God, wholly abyssed in His 
love, detached from all satisfaction. 
When you find yourself in this 
state, help yourself with occasional 
darts of love, such as 'Ah, my God, 
my true Good, I am thine!' Then 
remain peacefully in His presence 
even though you cannot meditate, 
which does not matter. With regard 
to these affections or loving darts, 
do not force your spirit in making 
them, but do so gently for now you 
must not be governed as in the be- 
ginning. Afterwards, if it seems 
to you that you have done nothing 
right, do not be disturbed. Rejoice 
at being so poor and needy before 
God and that He alone is infinitely 
rich and able to enrich you in an 
instant." 

Again he writes, "When you are 
in such extreme interior desolation 
and destitution that you no longer 
seem to possess faith, embrace the 
most holy will of God in darkness 
and remain without comfort on the 
cross of Jesus, silently continuing 



your repose of love in pure and holy 
faith. Even though a storm rages 
in the lower portion of your soul, 
let the supreme part remain in 
pure, simple, loving attention to the 
Sovereign Good. But it will be well 
to arouse your soul from time to 
time by gently repeating some ex- 
pression of love. As far as possible 
you should remain attentive to God 
in lively faith, without bothering 
about feelings and satisfaction. Oh, 
what a holy prayer is this; Jesus 
finds in it all His delight." (L., I, 
448) 

The point brought out in the 
above italics is important. The pur- 
pose of these acts, or brief collo- 
quies on the Passion is not to 
arouse sensible devotion. Their on- 
ly purpose is to seek and to please 
God. St. Paul's advice on this point 
is clear and emphatic. "I implore 
you not to seek consolation in pray- 
er or in any exercise of devotion 
whatsoever. Simply ' strive after 
greater purity of intention to please 
God alone in all your occupations 
and render Him all the glory of 
everything." (Ill, 365) 

To Mother Mary of the Cruci- 
fied, the first Passionist nun, he 
writes; "You are right not to be 
concerned about satisfaction ; above 
all when it is sensible, in the in- 
ferior, the animal part. Be satis- 
fied to taste God solely with the 
supreme part of the soul, in living 
and pure faith. To perceive the 
taste of the divine presence mat- 
ters not at all, but it matters much 



124 



to remain in that divine presence in 
pure faith, divested of all satisfac- 
tion, for love of that God who is 
Himself the joy of our joys. There- 
fore let the superior part of your 
spirit repose on the bosom of God 
like a tiny infant, in the silence of 
faith and holy love. 

To Francis Appiani, a future 
Passionist, he writes: "At times 
it will seem to you that you can 
neither meditate nor remain in this 
loving attention to God. You will 
seem like a statue. Do not be 
pained, but continue to remain at 
prayer the fixed time; only revive 
your faith in the Divine Presence 
and raise your spirit towards His 
divine Majesty with some affec- 
tion." (I, 401) He tells Agnes 
Grazi and others almost exactly the 
same thing. 

For many souls, the entrance into 
this form of prayer may prove a 
difficult transition in their spiritual 
life. Finding themselves in such 
aridity and apparent inability to 
pray and perceiving such little im- 
mediate fruit from such prayer, 
they will first be inclined to lose 
interest in prayer and then grad- 
ually to omit it in favor of some 
"more useful" occupation. Such a 
decision would be fatal, and unless 
God interferes by His merciful 
providence, could easily mean the 
end of all advance in the spiritual 
life, if not the beginning of decay. 
That is why our Holy Founder 
said : "It is necessary to be careful 
not to leave prayer at this painful 



time, because the suffering will not 
diminish, but on the contrary the 
soul would be afflicted the more and 
without profit, because it would 
see itself going into tepidity. God 
gives me to understand that the 
soul which He wishes to draw to 
high union with Him by means of 
prayer must pass by this way of 
suffering during prayer. She must, 
I say, suffer without any sensible 
consolation so that the soul knows 
not where it is." (Diary, Dec. 10) 
That is why he urged the members 
of his own family to "make your 
mental prayer every day even 
though you seem like a rock during 
it." To one religious he writes: 
"Above all, never leave prayer, even 
though you should have to endure 
the pains of hell." He urged his 
disciples to unite their desolation 
with the sufferings and desolation 
of Christ on the cross. 

Perhaps someone may ask wheth- 
er this prayer of faith, being "a 
simple and loving attention to God 
in a silence of faith and love" is a 
prayer of contemplation. Father 
Cajetan, C.P. answers this ques- 
tion (in St. Paul's Doctrine on 
Prayer, end of ch. 13) by saying 
that generally St. Paul of the Cross 
himself did not consider whether 
he was recommending an acquired 
prayer of simplicity or a coopera- 
tion with infused prayer. He was 
not interested in theoretical ques- 
tions that might satisfy the curiosi- 
ty and possibly the pride of his dis- 
ciple, but rather was simply intent 



125 



on promoting the soul's progress 
and advance in prayer. His advice 
was practical and sufficent in either 
case. 

Although this is the way that 
God leads those souls whom He 
calls to contemplation, it seems that 
not all souls who are led. this far 
attain to contemplation, according 
to St. John of the Cross, "At times 
they cannot meditate; at others 
they can. For God sets them in this 
night only to prove them and to 
humble them and to reform their 
desires, so that they go not nurtur- 
ing in themselves a gluttony in 
spiritual things. He sets them 
there not in order to lead them in 
the way of the spirit, which is con- 
templation; for not all those who 
consciously walk in the way of the 
spirit are brought to contemplation, 
nor even the half of them, — why, 
He knows best." (Dark Night, I,x) 

(Our Holy Founder frequently 
said that he thought that Passion- 
ists, by reason of the austere life 
they lead and the rule they follow, 
were all called to a 'high prayer.') 

It might be well to mention also 
that this prayer of arid faith may 
not be continuous, even for those 
whom God wishes to lead to con- 
templation. Hence, St. John of the 
Cross, (Dark Night, II, c. 13) and 



St. Teresa of Avila, (Life, c. 14) 
tell us, — and we see the same in the 
quotations of our Holy Founder 
given above, — that when the soul 
can, without great effort exercise 
itself in a simplified form of medi- 
tation it should do so. This medi- 
tation and colloquy should gener- 
ally be about the sufferings of 
Christ and His sorrowful Mother 
or about the divine attributes. If 
unable to meditate, then one should 
try to remain in the presence of 
God in faith and love. And of 
course, if the soul is attracted to 
make the prayer of faith, it should 
always do so. 

Such, briefly, are the 'ways of 
prayer' that lead up to the door of 
contemplation. Practically, the way 
is not complex. It is simply a ques- 
tion of following the attractions of 
the Holy Spirit. If He calls the 
soul to recollection it is to follow, — 
simply, humbly, — seeking not its 
own satisfaction, but seeking God 
alone. If God leaves the soul in 
dryness and aridity and even ap- 
parent inability to pray at all, then 
the soul is to be at peace, aban- 
doned to the will of God, and hum- 
bly enter into its own nothingness 
and helplessness before God, doing 
its best to keep lovingly attentive to 
Him. 

Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P. 



126 



The Seven Ordinandi of Holy Cross Province, ordained May 19 at Louisville, 
Kentucky. Front row, left to right: Frs. Ward, Bernardine and Dominic. 2nd 
row: Frs. Emmet, Melvin, Michael and Kent. 



Father Melvin of Mary, C.P. will 
celebrate his First Solemn Mass in 
our Passionist Church of the Im- 
maculata, Cincinnati, Ohio, where 
he was baptized Albert H. Glutz 
in 1923. Fr. Melvin spent six years 
at our Preparatory Seminary in St. 
Louis. 



Fr. Kent of Our Mother of Good 
Counsel, C.P. sang his First Solemn 
Mass May 27 in Blessed Sacrament 
Church, South Ft. Mitchell, Ken- 
tucky, where he was baptized Clif- 
ford Pieper) in 1921. After pass- 
ing through St. Henry Grade and 
High School, at Erlanger, Ky., he 
spent 4 years at the Preparatory 
Seminary. 



Fr. Emmet of Mary Immaculate, 
C.P. will return to St. Gall's, in 
Chicago for his First Solemn Mass 
in the city which welcomed him 
into the world 29 years ago, as 
Matthias Linden, in St. Mary of 
Mt. Carmel Parish. Fr. Emmet 
spent 5 years at the Preparatory 
Seminary. 



Fr. Michael of St. Joseph, C.P. 
(Joseph Brosnahan) was baptized 
in St. Mary's Cathedral, Winnipeg, 
Canada in 1915. After Parochial 
and High School at Annunciation 
Parish and De la Salle, Minnea- 
polis, Minn., he spent 4 years at 
the Preparatory Seminary. Father 

127 



returned to Annunciation Church 
for his First Solemn Mass. 



Fr. Ward of Our Sorrowful 
Mother, C.P., was baptized William 
Biddle in Kansas City, Mo. 28 
years ago. He spent some time at 
St. George High School, Evanston, 
Illinois and at Quigley Seminary, 
Chicago, before entering the Pre- 
paratory Seminary in 1940. His 
First Solemn Mass was held at Im- 
maculate Conception Church, Mor- 
ris, Illinois. 



Fr. Bernardine of Jesus and 
Mary, C.P. (Richard Johnson) re- 
turned to Culver City, California, 
where he was baptized in St. Au- 
gustine's Church in 1924, for his 
First Solemn Mass. After attend- 
ing Los Angeles College and Junior 
Seminary, Father spent one year 
at the Preparatory Seminary in 
St. Louis. 



Fr. Dominic of St. Michael, C.P. 
sang his First Solemn Mass at St. 
Bernard's Church, Chicago, May 27. 
Born in 1908 and baptized Law- 
rence Merriman, Father spent all 
his Preparatory years at St. Louis. 




MORE MISSIONARY WORK 

From the St. William's Parish Bulletin, Durant, Oklahoma, comes the fol- 
lowing excerpt. Its author is the Rev. Fr. Kerns, Pastor, who has three Mis- 
sion Churches besides his regular Parish. "Father George Jungles, C.P., of St. 
Paul, Kansas, will complete two weeks of very successful missions in Holy Cross 
Church, Madill (Okla.), and St. Anthony's, Tishomingo. Many non-Catholics 
attended services in both places, and even came to the daily 7:00 Mass and 
sermon. All the people have been very pleased and were well rewarded spiritually 
by Fathr's work, and also received excellent instructions. Bishop McGuinness 
told me this week how pleased he was that the Passionist Order has been giving 
Missions in the little parishes of the Diocese (of Oklahoma City and Tulsa), 
where the ordinary fee is usually prohibitive for small parishes. This is an 
excellent missionary work of these good priests. We want to extend our thanks 
to Father George Jungles for his work in these two churches, and also thank 
the Order for offering to take these appointments. We hope to have Father for 
a mission in Durant on completion of the new Church, and for one in Caddo. . . ." 



128 



a ptrfejst 



Oh man, how didst thou merit such a high estate 

That Christ to kinship with Himself did consecrate 
Thy person? That a Mystic Rite should make thee trod 

In ways that are reserved for only thee and God? 
No Seraph in his breathless glory near the Throne 

Durst hope for priv'lege that is to thy kind alone! 
Thy lips to speak the words that only Christ could give 

Through which at thy request He swiftly comes to live 
Upon the Altar, and in thy anointed hands 

Thou dost the Miracle, while wondering Heaven stands 
In dread and termbling awe; and blessed spirits bow 

About thee in their adoration. On thy brow 

Far more resplendent than the dazzling, mystic crown 
On Mighty Moses, as with reverent feet unshod 

He came down to his people from his talk with God! 
For Moses bore but Tablets writ in God's Command — 

Whilst thou dost bear That God Himself within thy hand! 
Thou canst do more than Joshua, who could stay the sun, 

For thou within the Cup canst The Almighty One 
Repose with confidence, or bring Him forth again 

To give to hungry souls to be the Life of men ! 
In power given thee by Christ thou art a god! 

Whilst in thine own right thou art but a mortal clod. 
And hence thou linkest up the two opposed extremes — 

By bringing God to man and man to God! It seems 
That thou of all God's creatures art the living span 

That bridgest over the abyss 'tween God and man ! 
Thou art to souls an usher, teacher, judge and guide. 

Thou standest at life's Portals. Through the laving tide 
Of Sacrosanct Baptismal thou dost welcome in 

A soul to Christ's earth Kingdom, later to begin 
The task of forming Jesus early in that soul 

Through truths that thou hast taken from the Gospel Scroll. 
And thou art Heaven's Warden, Keeper of the Keys, 

That loose the locks of sin, when on their bended knees 
The victims of Hell's hatred, in their sorrow sue. 

For Mercy and forgiveness. Thus thou canst pursue 
Thy mighty, god-like power that can Hell defy, 

With knowledge sure that Christ thy acts will ratify! 
Thou art an angel bringing comfort where life's ills 

Leave desolation and thy mystic word instills 
New Hope and Life in hearts abandoned to despair. 

And men completely trust the power of thy Prayer. 
So too, when someone's finished life begins to wane, 

As Keeper of the Keys thou wilt be called again 
To close the gates of Hell and open wide the door 

Of Paradise and usher in a soul once more 
To join the happy host that sings about the Throne 

Of God, no longer fearful of a fate unknown. 
On earth thou takest God's own place. When time has ceased 
Thou wilt for aye remain Another Christ — A Priest! 

—Father Hilary C.P. 



129 




HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 



Immaculate Conception 
Retreat 

The Chicago Community received 
a very welcome visit from Most Rev. 
Paul Taguchi, Bishop of Osaka, Ja- 
pan. His Excellency, it will be re- 
called addressed a letter to our last 
Provincial Chapter requesting Mis- 
sionaries for his Diocese in Japan. 
Bishop Taguchi, returning to Japan 
from his visit to Rome, spent a week 
at the Monastery. There were many 
interesting and enlightening things 
to tell about his people. He stressed 
the need of an intellectual apostolate 
among the elite of the country, for 
the educated Japanese are eager to 
embrace western culture and religion. 
The city of Osaka, his see, is Japan's 
most industrial city, with a popula- 
tion nearly equalling that of Chica- 
go. 



The Brethren of the Province will 
be interested to know that Rev. Fr. 
Augustine, C.P. returned home from 



the hospital in April. Father slipped 
on the ice last winter, while descend- 
ing from a bus, and broke a hip. 
Though still confined to a wheel- 
chair, Father has obtained permis- 
sion to say Mass sitting. 



The week of April 15th was a 
sad one. The Community attended 
the funerals of Fr. Terence's father 
and Fr. Germain's father. The stu- 
dents Choir sang the Requiem Mass 
on each occasion. 



New slate has recently been put 
on the Choir roof. The corridors 
have also been sanded and sealed, 
as has the Choir floor, and the light 
seal makes a fine appearance. 



Fr. Anthony Maloney's "Hunan 
Newsletter" is doing an excellent 
job of keeping the Brethren in- 
formed. The prayers of the Province 
are with him and all those about 
whom he writes. 



130 



Holy Cross Monastery 

Mt. Adams, it seems, is no longer 
"The Holy Hill" of Cincinnati. The 
light of faith shines resplendently on 
Good Friday, it is true, but the old 
Hill otherwise is merely basking in 
the reflected glory of the strong faith 
of thousands of pilgrims from Ohio, 
Kentucky and Indiana. The Hill is 
not what it was, but it still has the 
drawing power of the Cross on Good 
Friday. An estimated 40,000 made 
"the steps" this year, beginning with 
Midnight on Holy Thursday and con- 
tinuing until Midnight on Good Fri- 
day. An annual increase of Colored, 
both old and young, has been noted 
among the pilgrims. At five in the 
evening, the line of pilgrims extended 
almost to the Engine House at Mar- 
tin and Eastern Avenues — a sight 



that cannot fail to instil a renewal 
of confidence in the power of the 
Cross and its Divine Tragedy. 




Fr. Anthony Maloney, C.P. His 

"Hunan Newsletter" is a vital 

source of contact with our Mis- 
sionaries. 



Rev. Fr. Edwin Konan, C.P. re- 
ceived the unique request to rewrite 
the Holy Rules of the Carmelite 
Teaching Sisters, at Villa Teresa, 
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. Fr. Ed- 
win accomplished his unusual as- 
signment in April, and returned once 
more to his many mission and re- 
treat appointments. 



Constant development of the Lay- 
men's Retreats has now reached 
capacity at Holy Cross Retreat 
House. There are twenty-three 
rooms, two beds to a room. Now 
there is no more room. The work is 
selling itself on its own merits. The 
ambition to obtain a sufficient num- 
ber of retreatants has long been re- 
placed by embarrassment at refusing 
the overflow. 



The heavy schedule of Jubilee Year 
Missions and Retreats taxed the per- 
sonnel of the Monastery to its capa- 
city this Spring. Many late requests 
for Missions in the Archdiocese had 
to be refused. In several parishes, 
the Diocesan Clergy supplied the 
preaching. 

Captain Cyril Mary Jablanovsky, 

C.P. has been transferred from Camp 
Polk, La., to Camp Hood, Texas. He 
expects to leave for Europe some- 
time in July, and is anxious to be 
remembered to and by the Brethren. 



Sacred Heart Retreat 

The annual celebration for the 
Clergy of the Diocese of Louisville 

131 



and surrounding areas was held on 
the feast of St. Paul of the Cross, 
April 28. Despite the fact that it was 
a Saturday, which detained many of 
the out-of-the-city Pastors, there was 
a fine showing. Rev. Fr. Link of 
nearby St. Francis of Assisi was the 
celebrant for the Solemn Mass. The 
sermon was preached excellently by 
Rev. Fr. John Bancroft, Pastor of 
Howardstown, Kentucky. 

The Mass was well attended by the 
laity, and the blessings were given 
with the relic every hour in the 
Church. It was a very successful day 
for all concerned. 



May 19 saw the Ordination of the 
Retreat's seven deacons. Most Rev. 
John A. Floersh, Archbishop of 
Louisville performed the ceremony 
in Assumption Cathedral. Those or- 
dained were Rev. Frs. Melvin Glutz, 
Emmet Linden, Kent Pieper, Michael 
Brosnahan, Ward Biddle, Bernardine 
Johnson and Dominic Merriman, 
C.P. Rev. Fr. Melvin was the only 
one to sing his First Solemn Mass 
the next day, May 20. The others 
sang theirs a week later, May 27. 



Cyril Lancaster, the Monastery 
helper who does everything well, 
recently completed a new set of 
screens for the whole house, includ- 
ing the windows opening on to the 
rear porch. No small job, by any 
standard, it promises to make the 
house more beautiful — and more 
comfortable in the summertime. 



St. Francis Hieronymo Retreat 

It is always good news to hear of 
another Profession, doubly so, it 

132 



seems, to hear that another has em- 
braced the austere life of the Pas- 
sionist Brother. On March 25, the 
Feast of Easter, Brother Justin (Gar- 
rity), of the Bronx, New York, made 
his Profession of Temporary Vows. 
Very Rev. Fr. Elmer, Rector, received 
the Profession. On April 27, Brother 
Paul (Mercer) of Denver, Colorado 
received the Holy Habit from Very 
Rev. Fr. Rector, raising to five the 
number of Brother Novices. There 
are no Brother Postulants at this 
writing. 

The Community has found very 
interesting and inspiring the Re- 
fresher Course given by Rev. Fr. 
Pius. The two weeks course ran 
from April 23 to May 4. 



St. Paul's Monastery 

The 1950-51 season has seen a 
large increase in the number of Re- 
treatants in Detroit. The April 20- 
22 Retreat, the twenty-ninth of the 
year, found an increase of 73 over 
the corresponding total for last year. 
This same retreat also made a record 
for number of Retreatants, 45. It 
also meant a lot of crowding into a 
space where formerly the Retreat Di- 
rector would have been satisfied to 
accommodate 30. 



There are eight new Retreat groups 
this year, while two more have al- 
ready applied for next year. Evident- 
ly, the Retreat Movement is going 
strong in the automobile city. 



This season has also seen a consid- 
erable increase in the amount of 
the financial contributions by re- 
treatants. There seems to be a great- 






er awareness on the part of those 
making retreats at St. Paul's Mon- 
astery of the satisfying care given 
to their physical as well as their 
spiritual welfare, and it has shown 
itself in a corresponding apprecia- 
tion, both for Fr. Angelo's excellent 
conferences and Brother Theodore's 
highly praised cuisine. 



St. Gabriel Monastery 

On Feb. 20, Bro. Romuald cele- 
brated his Golden Jubilee of Relig- 
ious Profession. A Solemn Mass was 
sung and a day of private festivity 
kept by the community at Des 
Moines. 

Bro. Romuald is second in dean- 
ship of the brothers of our province, 
and has been in the province since 
its foundation, living in most of the 
houses in the west. St. Louis, St. 
Paul, and Des Moines especially are 
the places where he has spent most 
of his years as outside brother. He 
has filled this post for all but the 
last few years. 

All who know Bro. Romuald will 
agree that he is one of our most 
faithful and exemplary Brothers, a 
modest, retiring, regular religious, 
whose devotion to the monastic ob- 
servance and to solitude is second to 
none in the province. He has loved 
his vocation as a Brother, and since 
the day he pronounced his vows he 
has lived up to the highest ideals of 
a Passionist brother, generously, and 
good-naturedly, and with never a 
word of criticism of others or a 
thought of consideration for himself. 
His motto seems to have always been 
his life, at least has shown it — "to 
work and to pray." 



This year Brother Romuald marks 
his fiftieth golden year of service to 
God and to the congregation. To 
Brother Romuald the whole province 
offers its congratulations and prayers 
for continued blessings in his Pas- 
sionist vocation. 



A new rubber-tile floor has been 
laid in the body of the chapel. This 
completes the renovation of the cha- 
pel that has been under way for the 
last year and more, — freshly-painted 
walls, a new organ, repainted altars, 
and new carpet in the sanctuary. 



Mater Dolorosa Retreat 

Sierra Madre lost two members 
of its Community recently. Rev. Fr. 





Chaplain Lucian Hogan, C.P. 



133 



Lucian, C.P., formerly Assistant Di- 
rector at Mater Dolorosa Laymen's 
Retreat House, was called by the 
Navy during Easter week. Father 
Lucian spent his Chaplain's training 
at the Naval Training Station, New- 
port, Rhode Island. At the comple- 
tion of his course, he was assigned 
to the U.S. Naval Training Station, 
Bainbridge, Maryland. Brother Pat- 
rick, C.P. was transferred to Christ 
the King Retreat, Citrus Heights, 
California. 



The Community was happy to wel- 
come Chaplain Kenny Lynch, C.P. 

for a day. Father Kenny has been 
assigned by the Army to the U.S. 
Disciplinary Barracks at Lompoc, 
California — quite a change, undoubt- 
edly, from his recent work of preach- 
ing the Lay Retreats at Citrus 
Heights. 



The attention of the Province is 
called to the fact that the Box num- 
ber for Mater Dolorosa Retreat has 
been changed. Instead of Box 215, 
the number is now Box 7, Sierra Ma- 
dre, California. 



News from Mater Dolorosa Re- 
treat House finds that Rev. Fr. Gab- 
riel, C.P. has been appointed As- 
sistant Retreat Director, to replace 
Fr. Lucian, who was called to the 
Navy. 

Since January 1st, there have been 
a total of 1051 Retreatants. The 
mid-week retreats, a welcome inno- 
vation this Retreat season, have 
been adding an average of 15 to the 
weekly totals. A fine average has 
been the number of new Retreatants 



— there has been 391 so far this year. 
71 were non-Catholics, another ex- 
cellent average. April 20-22, marked 
the 781st Retreat in Sierra Madre, 
giving a grand total of 32,758 men 
who have made Retreats here. 

The days of Recollection for the 
Diocesan Clergy are held monthly 
and are well attended. 



Christ the King Retreat 

During the Annual Visitation, Very 
Rev. Fr. Provincial established the 
cloister on the first floor of the new 
Retreat House. 



Brother Patrick was transferred 
to Christ the King shortly before 
Easter, and has been doing the same 
grand work there that he formerly 
did in Sierra Madre. The work of 
landscaping, consequently, has been 
going on at a remarkable rate — due 
largely to the generous and capable 
assistance of Mr. Jerry Olrich. He 
has given unstintingly of his time, 
coming out on Saturdays and holi- 
days and bring a few men with him 
to help along with the work. Many 
of these men are non-Catholics. 
Through their labor has been built a 
very attractive fish pond, octagonal 
in shape, twenty feet across, all do- 
nated by non-Catholics. It is a com- 
plete job — fish, water lilies and step- 
ping stones around the pond. Already 
fine lawns surround the house, to- 
gether with an excellent selection of 
shrubs, including a large and valu- 
able collection of camellias of seven 
or eight varieties. Some orange and 
other fruit trees have been planted 
in addition to all the rest. 



134 



At present, the men are working 
on two other projects. We hope to 
hear, in the near future, that both 
the Out-door Stations and the Shrine 
to Our Lady of Lourdes have been 
completed. 



Holy Name Retreat 

"I wish to take this occasion," 
wrote His Excellency, Most Rev. W. 
J. Nold, Bishop of Galveston, to Rev. 
Fr. Conleth, Superior of Holy Name 
Retreat at Houston, "to express my 
satisfaction regarding the fine work 
being done by you in the promotion 
of the Lay Retreat Movement. . . . 
Anything that you can do by word 
or by writing to encourage our lay 



people to this end will redound to 
God's glory, to growth in holiness 
and to the meriting of God's help 
and favor in these our troubled 
times." Dated March 5, 1951 

There will be many a "word" and 
much "writing" in the Galveston 
Diocese in the near future. Holy 
Name Retreat is opening its drive 
for funds to build the new Retreat 
House for Laymen. The balance 
sheet, as outlined in the Drive bro- 
chure, calls for the raising of a total 
of $38,000 by July 1st. The estimated 
cost of the first unit of the new Re- 
treat House is $120,000. The building 
fund now totals $32,000. Of the re- 
maining $88,000 the sum of $50,000 
is to be borrowed, and the rest, it is 




The Citrus Heights Community. L. to r. Fr. Damian, Brother Patrick, Fr. Henry. 
Fr. Jerome, Very Rev. Fr. Basil (Rector) and Hro. Anthony. Fr. Dunstan is absent. 



135 



hoped, will be subscribed in the 
Drive. 

The Brochure, an excellently ar- 
ranged and straight-to-the-point lit- 
tle pamphlet, outlines four "Plans." 
Plan No. 1 is the "St. Paul of the 
Cross Club," an association to be 
formed of those interested in promot- 
ing the Retreat Movement. The dues 
— $30 per year for Annual Member- 
ships, $500 for Life Memberships — 
will help finance the Movement and 
provide the adequate facilities upon 
which effective Retreat work so 



largely depends. Membership in the 
"Club" will entitle an individual and 
his family to certain spiritual priv- 
ileges, as Benefactors of the Con- 
gregation. 

Plan No. 2 seeks to enlist donors 
who are willing to endow a room in 
the new Retreat House, at the cost 
of $2000. Plan No. 3 draws atten- 
tion to the great number of various 
items that are vitally necessary to 
the equipment of the new Retreat 
House, and their approximate costs. 
For example, Vestments, Chalices, 



MASTER PLAN OF HOLY NAME RETREAT HOUSE, HOUSTON, TEXAS 



r^ 




The Master Plan looks 
forward to an even- 
tual Retreat House for 
75 retreatants. 

Assembly room to be 
used as temporary 
chapel. 

Dormitory wing: to 
have 20 single and 
4 double rooms. Thus 
to accommodate 28 
men. 

Permanent k : tchen 

and dining room 

(Shaded area to be 
constructed now) 



36 




Convent of the Sacred Passion, at Erlanger, Kentucky. 



Altar furnishings, Stations, etc. Plan 
No. 4 seeks patrons for the Corner- 
stone Booklet. 

The Passionists at Houston have 
their work cut out for them. Noth- 
ing has been overlooked. Rev. Fr. 
Regis, C.P. has been assigned to 
Houston for two months to help out 
with the Drive. It is hoped to start 
the construction this summer, pro- 
vided the Drive is successful. The 
Community earnestly requests the 
prayers of the Brethren to this end. 



In another letter to Rev. Fr. Con- 
leth, His Excellency Bishop Nold has 
requested: "I should appreciate your 
soliciting from the pastors of the 
Diocese retreats and missions during 
this year of Jubilee, since they, in 
turn, were instructed to provide for 
their people such spiritual exercises." 
This letter was dated April 4, 1951. 
On April 10th, a triple enclosure was 
sent to each pastor in the Diocese 
of Galveston. First there was a copy 



of the letter to the Apostolic Dele- 
gate from the Sacred Congregation 
of Religious urging Missions and 
Retreats during the Jubilee Year. 
Next there was a copy of His Ex- 
cellency's letter to Fr. Conleth, quot- 
ed above in excerpt. Finally, there 
was a letter suggesting what help 
the Passionist Fathers could give, 
and inviting inquiries for the Fall 
Mission and Retreat schedule. 



St. Joseph's Retreat 

A series of Days of Recollection 
have been inaugurated at Birming- 
ham. Twelve men, all officers of the 
Holy Name Society throughout the 
city, attended the first, in January. 
Up to May, a total of six retreats 
were given. The men have shown 
themselves very enthusiastic. Pas- 
tors and people want to know when 
their parish is going to have one. 



137 




(Above) The Refectory, simple and austere, of the Nuns. The Retreatants have 
their own dining Room. 17 ladies (a full house) made the first Retreat, April 
20-22. (Below) The Novice's Recreation. Through the window can be seen the 
enclosure, and the end of the opposite wing of the Convent which is built in a 
"U shape. 




138 






St. Joseph's promises soon to be 
out of the "country". New homes are 
being built on the property that ad- 
joins St. Joseph's both on the east 
and the west. 



The Passionist Nuns 

May 1st saw the fifth time that 
the Vestition ceremony has been 
held in St. Joseph's Monastery, 
Owensboro, Kentucky. Most Rev. 
Bishop Francis J. Cotton presided at 
the ceremony which admitted Sister 
Marie Therese of the Child Jesus of 
the Holy Face to the holy habit. Fr. 



Joseph Saffer, Pastor of St. Martin's 

Church, Rome, Kentucky preached 

the sermon for the occasion. 

St. Joseph's now numbers 11 in all, 

eight professed, two novices and one 

postulant. 

The Women's Lay Retreats opened 
this year on the first week-end of 
April. The initial group was very 
enthusiastic over Father Hubert's in- 
spiring talks. Two retreats for the 
Colored were scheduled. The first of 
these, however, had to be cancelled 
for lack of reservations, but may be 
held later in the season. 



The interior of the Chapel (Nun's side). Though more austere than the public 
side, the grill work is the same, and gives a very attractive appearance to the 
Chapel. 




L39 



"The Passionist" was pleased to 
hear, through St. Joseph's Monas- 
tery, that the Passionist Nuns of 
Mamers and Sables, France found 
the article "Companionship with 
Mary in Comforting Christ" (Nov. 
1949) very interesting, and have 
translated it into French. 



After two years of praying and 
planning, the new Convent of the 
Passion, now stands, simply and 
beautifully, on Donaldson Highway, 
west of Erlanger, Kentucky. Janu- 
ary 16th, exactly one year to the day 
on which work was begun, saw the 
completion of the new Convent. It 
was a year during which Heaven 
raised and shattered the hopes and 
plans of the Nuns, and rewarded 
their prayers with the excellent little 
"dream" convent that they now pos- 
sess. 

The little Community found the 
"exodus" to the new Convent a 
unique experience. The generosity of 
devoted friends, and especially of 
Rev. Fr. Nicholas, Chaplain, found 
the Nuns safely transported to their 
new quarters. Evening found a place 
for everyone and everything, and 
with a little more time, all was in 
its proper place. 

January 24th was the date set by 
Most Rev. Bishop Mulloy for the 
Dedication, a day preceded by much 
preparation and arrangement. Again, 
generous friends helped smooth away 
the difficulties as soon as they arose. 

The Dedication of the Chapel and 
the Blessing of the Convent preceded 
the Solemn Pontifical Mass offered 
by His Excellency, Bishop Mulloy. 
Honorary Deacons were Rev. Frs. 
Herbert and Leo Egbring, with Rev. 



Frs. Schmidt and Witte Deacon and 
Subdeacon of the Mass. The Nuns 
expressed their joy and gratitude at 
seeing Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick, 
C.P., Provincial of Holy Cross Pro- 
vince, and so many of the Fathers 
present. Honoring the occasion were 
Very Rev. Fr. Gilbert, C.P., Rector 
of Cincinnati, Very Rev. Fr. Gordian, 
C.P., Rector of Louisville, Rev. Frs. 
Egbert, Bernard, Cyprian, Robert, 
Donald, Cyril Mary, and their be- 
loved Chaplain, Rev. Fr. Nicholas. 
Members of the Diocesan Clergy 
present were Rev. Frs. Hickey, Ten- 
nenfeld, Deye, Brophy and Ciangetti, 
besides Rt. Rev. Msgr. Geisen, and 
Rt. Rev. Msgr. Carlin. 

Rev. Mother Domitilla, O.S.B., who 
so graciously welcomed the Nuns up- 
on their arrival in Covington five 
years ago, sent a choir of sixteen 
Sisters to provide for the musical 
arrangements for the Dedication. 
Under the direction of Sister M. Ce- 
cilia, O.S.B., the choir rendered beau- 
tifully the music for the occasion. 

His Excellency, Bishop Mulloy 
preached an inspiring sermon on the 
part the life of the Passionist Nun 
plays in the Mystical Body, taking as 
his text the words of the Introit: 
"Terrible is this place. It is the 
House of God and the Gate of Heav- 
en." 

Then, in order to give the public 
an opportunity to become acquaint- 
ed with the Nuns and their mode of 
life, the Bishop lifted the enclosure 
for two weeks, that all might in- 
spect the building. During that time, 
many visitors availed themselves of 
the privilege of entering the "enclos- 
ure", despite the inclement weather. 



140 



The Passionist Nuns at the Con- 
vent of the Passion are home at last. 
The Passionist and the Province of- 
fers congratulations. The Nuns, for 
their part, wish to extend the senti- 
ments of deepest gratitude to the 
Fathers and Brothers and Nuns of 
both Provinces, East and West, for 
the spiritual and material assistance 
during the past four years. 



Our Parishes 

Immaculate Conception Parish in 

Chicago is in the process of building 
an additional two class rooms to the 
school. At first, there was thought of 
adding a second story, but it was de- 
cided that the foundations would not 
take the weight. 



Rev. Fr. Richard, C.P., Pastor, or- 
ganized the first Holy Year Pil- 
grimage in Chicago. On Palm Sun- 
day, March 18th, a total of ten buses, 
carrying over 300 persons, and a 
good number of private cars made 
the trip to the four Churches, Im- 
maculate Conception, Holy Name Ca- 
thedral, St. Patrick, and Holy Name. 
The Pastor and Assistants accom- 
panied the groups, reciting the Ros- 
ary going and coming. It was a 
great success. 



The Altar Society of St. Gemma's 
Parish, Detroit, Michigan, through 
the encouragement of Rev. Fr. Pat- 
rick, C.P., Pastor, has inaugurated 
the Block Rosary among its mem- 
bers, and hopes that the example 
will catch on everywhere in the Par- 
ish. 

St. Gemma's School. First Unit, 
which the Parish is using as B tem- 



porary Parish Hall, was completed 
and the Open House held Sunday 
March 18. A good crowd was pres- 
ent for the Opening, and many en- 
joyed the movie "Peace Plan From 
Heaven" which was shown by Mr. 
Leo Leddy, of St. Mary of Redford. 
A second Open House was held three 
weeks later, inviting all the residents 
and good friends from the Castle- 
ford subdivision. 



Holy Cross Church and Immacu- 
lata Church, Cincinnati, were visited 
by an estimated 40,000 people on 
Good Friday. Holy Cross Church 
was donated a beautiful four foot 
statue of St. Mary Goretti. The sta- 
tue preserves the distinctly peasant 
atmosphere, and is not overdone. It 
is the first statue that we have seen 
in the Western Province. 



Holy Family Mission reports 30 
adults and children making their 
First Holy Communion at Easter 
time. Practically all of them were 
converts. On April 15th, Most Rev. 
Bishop Toolen arrived for Confirma- 
tion, and gave the sacrament to 133 
persons. His Excellency was pleased 
with the large number of converts, 
and had a special word of praise for 
the High School Choir. "In all my 
twenty-five years as a Bishop", he 
remarked "I have never heard such 
beautiful singing in my Diocese." It 
was a fitting note of tribute to the 
excellent training the Choir has re- 
ceived. Incidentally, the Choir sang 
all Gregorian. 

The annual rains came and the 
Hoods rose again this Spring, but the 



111 



Mission property was spared. An- 
other foot, and the water would have 
been in the Mission buildings. 



Holy Family reports a change in 
telephone numbers. The new number 
is 58-8204. 



From the "Mission Broadcast" 
comes the news that a group of CIO 
Union officials paid a visit to Holy 
Family Maternity Hospital, at Ens- 
ley. The different Locals have re- 
peatedly shown their interest and 
their generosity. They are anxiously 
awaiting the day when the general 
hospital for their people will see 



completion. The Drive was success- 
ful, and some funds are still coming 
in. Construction will be begun as 
soon as the Government gives the 
green light. 



During the Winter, Holy Family 
High School was given membership 
in the Colored Basketball League. 
Besides having an "A" rating scho- 
lastically (above most Colored High 
Schools in the State), to be able to 
field a basketball team will mean 
another big step forward for our 
Passionist Mission School. It will 
also bring a new loyalty to Holy 
Family School and Mission. 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 



During the Christmas season the 
Provincial Curia provided superiors 
for our newly-erected monastery and 
retreat-house in Farmington, Conn. 
Fr. Thaddeus Purdon was elected 
rector and Fr. Leander Delli Veneri 
was appointed vice-rector. Fr. Lean- 
der had been a member of St. Mi- 
chael's community and a missionary 
active in the preaching of missions 
in the Italian language and Fr. 
Thaddeus had held the office of vicar 
in the same monastery. With the 
continuance of Fr. Joseph Leo Flynn 
as Director of Retreats and the ap- 
pointment of Fr. Philip Ryan as 
Retreat-Master the administrative 
staff of our new and beautiful foun- 
dation became complete. The sta- 
tioning of a full-sized community is 
reserved for a later date. 

In the meantime, Fr. Joseph Leo 
has been tireless in organizing, with 
the active cooperation of the local 
bishop and the parochial clergy, 



large retreat groups. The publicity 
that the secular press of the entire 
area has given our retreat house and 
the retreat movement has gone a 
long way towards quickly building 
up a large and zealous retreat clien- 
tele among laymen of the diocese. 
From the very first retreat held, 
early this year, the retreat-house has 
been filled to capacity. Capacity re- 
treat groups have also been signed 
up for all the available dates for 
many months to come. All this 
promises a prosperous future for 
our new monastery and retreat house 
of the Holy Family in Farmington, 
and this is all the more remarkable 
since there has not yet been any for- 
mal opening and dedication of the 
foundation, the date for this being 
set for early in the coming June. 



More than 1,400 relatives and 
friends crowded St. Michael's Monas- 
tery Church, Union City, N. J. on 



142 



Tuesday Feb. 27, to witness ordina- 
tion ceremonies for eighteen Pas- 
sionist religious at which Bishop 
James A. McNulty, auxiliary to the 
Archbishop of Newark, officiated. 
The newly-ordained priests are the 
following: Frs. Cormac Kinkead, of 
Jersey City; John Baptist Pesce and 
Godfrey Kasper, both of Union City; 
Kieran Baker of Queens Village, N. 
Y.; Jogues McQuillan and Anthony 
Mazzeo of Brooklyn, N. Y.; Ronan 
Callahan of Farmingdale, L. I.; Pas- 
cal Smith of Hollis, N. Y.; Gerald 
Hynes and Linus Rottloff of Balti- 
more, Md.; Peter Hallisy of Boston, 
Mass.; Gregory Durkin of Spring- 
field, Mass.; Canisius Lareau of 
Woonsocket, R. I.; Flavian Dougher- 
ty of Philadelphia, Pa.; Sebastian 



Kolinovsky of Taylor, Pa.; Dunstan 
Guzinski of Dunmore, Pa.; Cassian 
Yuhas of Hazelton, Pa.; Christopher 
Czachor of Archbald, Pa. 



Recently a large gathering of our 
brethren were invited to St. Michael's 
monastery, Union City, N. J., to 
attend a reception in honor of Fr. 
Cronan, whose twenty-fifth anniver- 
sary of ordination to the priesthood 
occurred on Feb. 27th. There was a 
solemn high mass, which the jubilari- 
an celebrated, and a jubilee dinner 
with the usual speeches of congratu- 
lation by Fr. Rector, acting as toast- 
master, by Fr. Provincial, and words 
of humble thanks by the jubilarian. 

Fr. Cronan has served well in the 
various priestly ministries that have 




Most Rev. Fr. General's visit to N. Carolina, Sept. 1950. L. to r.: Fr. Gerald 
Ryan, Fr. John Joseph Kndler, Fr. Ernest (Provincial), Fr. General, Fr. Julian 
Endler, Fr. Maurice Tew, Fr. Rerchmans McHuph. 



143 




Fr. Maurice Tew, C.P., on the occasion of his Silver Jubilee, Feb. 27, 1951 



been assigned him by his religious 
superiors. He served for a term of 
years as pastor of Wakefield, Mich., 
of the diocese of Marquette, during 
the administration of Bishop Nuss- 
baum, as director of students in 
Union City, N. J., as Vice-Rector in 
Scranton, as Pastor of St. Gabriel's 
Monastery parish in Brighton, Mass. 
. . . Fr. Cronan was forced to retire 
from the pastorate of St. Gabriel's 
by a very critical illness, which was 
followed by a long and slow recu- 
peration. After another term of of- 
fice as director of students in Union 
City, he was assigned as subscrip- 
tion promoter of the Sign Magazine, 
a work in which he is still engaged. 
Having endeared himself to all his 
religious brethren by his very gra- 
cious ways and his alert willingness 
for every kind of service both in the 
monastery and outside of it, Fr. Cro- 
nan has been the recipient of the 



heartfelt congratulations of all. 

Associated with Fr. Cronan in the 
same anniversary are Frs. Theodore 
Stout, Maurice Tew, Sidney Turner 
and Alphonsus Cooley. Other class- 
mates of Fr. Cronan are the former 
China Missionaries, Fr. Jordan 
Black, Miles McCarthy, and Cormac 
Shanahan. These last were ordained 
a couple of months ahead of their 
class in order to enable them to ex- 
pedite their departure for our mis- 
sions in China. Their twenty-fifth 
anniversary occurred on Dec. 19, 
1950. 



The death on April 26th of Fr. 
Charles of the Holy Rosary (Gaskin) 
in our Baltimore Monastery of St. 
Joseph stunned the brethren of our 
province as they have not been 
stunned by a death among our relig- 
ious in a long time. Very short was 
the interval that elapsed between the 



144 



first onset of the heart attack that 
was to carry him off and the moment 
in which he breathed his last. Fr. 
Charles was a man of such robust 
constitution and of such unvarying 
good health during his life that one 
naturally did not expect his earthly 
career to come to an end without 
an interval of physical decay from 
some critical illness or disease. How- 
ever, although it was not generally 
known, Fr. Charles' health was not 
as perfect as it seemed. Owing to 
high blood pressure during recent 
years, Fr. Charles had been forced 
to moderate his missionary work. 




»^*Tm* 



1MK/ jF* 1 *** 




Mother of Mercy Mission, Washington, 
N. Car. Easter 1951. Pastor is Fr. John 
Joseph Endler, C.P. 



He had so far benefited, or seemed 
to benefit, by this curtailed activity 
that he had laterly informed our 
superiors that he felt fit again for 
the missionary work to which he had 
been accustomed. Taking him at 
his word, the superiors gave him an 
appointment, but death intervened 
only the day before he was to leave 
home to carry out this assignment. 

The funeral of Fr. Charles was 
held in our monastery church and 
cemetery in Union City, N. J., to en- 
able relatives of the deceased, who 
was a native of Newark, N. J., to 
attend the funeral. 

The following material is taken 
from the obituary and account of the 
funeral that appeared in the Hudson 
Dispatch, Union City, N. J. 

"Rev. Charles Gaskin, C.P., former 
curate of St. Michael's Monastery 
Church, Union City, died at 4:45 p. 
m. yesterday in St. Joseph's Monas- 
tery, Baltimore, Md., where he was 
serving as a member of the mission 
band. He suffered a heart attack in 
his room there and died a few min- 
utes later. During World War I he 
served in France as an Army chap- 
lain, and on his return from service 
in 1919, was assigned to the Union 
City parish as an assistant pastor. — 
He served as Catholic chaplain of 
West Hoboken Fire Department and 
was also chaplain of West Hoboken 
Post, American Legion, during that 
time. — In 1923. he was named rec- 
tor of St. Gabriel's Monastery Bright- 
on, Mass., and after completing his 
term returned to preaching missions 
and retreats. He had conducted more 
than 300 missions and retreats dur- 
ing his priesthood, one of the latest 
of these being at St. Joseph's Roman 



145 



Catholic Church, Union City, last 
November, at which time he was as- 
sisted by Rev. Benedict Mawm, C.P., 
of St. Ann's Monastery, Scranton, 
Pa." (Hudson Dispatch, Apr. 27th) 
"Bishop James A. McNulty, auxili- 
ary of Newark, presided at the sol- 
emn high mass of requiem which 
was sung in St. Michael's Monastery 
Church, Union City, yesterday for 
Rev. Charles Gaskin, C.P., who died 
Thursday in St. Joseph's Monastery, 
Baltimore, Md., of a heart attack. 
The bishop gave the final blessing in 
the church following the mass, and 
accompanied the body to the grave in 
the monastery burial ground, where 
he again imparted the blessing. — The 
entire St. Michael's Community and 
other religious and secular priests 



took part in the solemn procession 
from the church to the grave with 6 
former military chaplains, all of St. 
Michael's Monastery, serving as pall- 
bearers for Fr. Charles, who served 
in World War I as an Army chap- 
lain. An honor guard from West Ho- 
boken Post, American Legion, of 
which Fr. Charles served as chap- 
lain in the early '20s, also assisted 
at the funeral. — The eulogy was 
given by Rev. Stephen Sweeney, C.P., 
a classmate fo Fr. Charles, who told 
of his death, Thursday, surrounded 
by the monks of the Baltimore com- 
munity. Fr. Charles summoned Very 
Rev. Colman Healy, C.P., rector of 
St. Joseph's, when he was stricken. 
'Call the brethren,' he said. 'I guess 
this is it. This is the way I wanted 




Mother of Mercy Mission, Washington, N Car. 



146 



it.' His last words, Fr. Stephen said, 
were 'Thank God, thank God.' Fa- 
.ther Stephen declared that these were 
'words of perfect agreement with 
God. Words that might justly be 
paraphrased into the solemnly sac- 
red words of Jesus: "It is finished. 
Into thy hands I commend my spir- 
it.' " — Father Stephen told of the 
boyhood of the priest and of his 
calling to the priesthood through the 
example of the late Father James 
Malloy, C.P.: 'Father James nour- 
ished the precious vocation as he did 
hundreds of others and until his 
death, he had in Father Charles, a 
most loyal, grateful and docile spiri- 
tual son.' Father Stephen pointed 
out that when the members of the 
class prepared their first sermons 
in 1916, every member of the class 
took for the theme of the discourse 
the love of Jesus shown in His mir- 
aculous birth. 'Father Charles, on 
the contrary, took for his theme 
"The poverty of the infant Jesus in 
His birth is the divine revelation of 
God's love for mankind" — His love 
for poetry made him severe with 
himself and very indulgent and kind- 
ly with others, Father Stephen said 
... He told of Father Charles' zeal 
for mission work, in which he la- 
bored for more than a quarter of a 
century. 'The magnanimity of his 
soul shone forth with celestial bright- 
ness in his dealings with sinners. He 
pleaded or scolded or threatened and 
even humored the poor soul until he 
was won back to Christ. Truly did 
Father Charles become all things 
to all men to gain all for Christ.' — 
More than 400 persons, including an 
estimated 100 priests and religious, 
crowded around the grave in the rear 



of the monastery, as Bishop McNul- 
ty imparted the final blessing. . . . 
Very Rev. Fr. Ernest Welch, pro- 
vincial of the Province of St. Paul of 
the Cross . . . was celebrant of the 
Mass, with Very Rev. Father Colman 
as deacon and Rev. Hubert Sweeney, 
C.P., as subdeacon. Rev. Jude Meade, 
C.P., director of students at St. 
Michael's, was master of ceremo- 
nies." 



On the feast of St. Gabriel, St. 
Gabriel's Mission For the Colored 
very appropriately celebrated the 
Silver Jubilee of its Founder and 
Pastor, Rev. Fr. Maurice Tew, C.P. 

The following Sunday, March 4, 
Fr. Maurice offered a Solemn High 
Mass in honor of St. Gabriel. Fr. 
John Joseph was Deacon and Fr. 
Daniel, Subdeacon, while Fr. Gerald 
Ryan was Master of Ceremonies. The 
sermon was preached by Fr. Julian 
Endler, C.P., Pastor of St. Joseph's 
Mission, New Bern, N.C. The Mis- 
sion church was crowded with Fr. 
Maurice's friends. Many non-Catho- 
lics came to pay their congratula- 
tions to the Jubilarian. 

The same day two young members 
of the Parish received their First 
Holy Communion. Arthur Moorning 
and Jesse Floyd received their Sav- 
iour for the first time during Fr. 
Maurice's Solemn Mass. 



Passionist Sisters 

The Sisters of the Cross and Pas- 
sion recently established a new 
American Province. The new Pro- 
vince goes under the name of Our 
Lady of Dolours. 

It has been twenty six years since 
the first band of Sisters landed in 



147 



America under the leadership of 
Mother M. Gonzaga, C.P. Since that 
time, they have founded five con- 
vents, all of them in the State of 
Rhode Island. The Novitiate for the 
new U.S. Province is located at Bris- 
tol, R.I. 

The Superiors of the new Province 
are Mother M. Pascal, C.P. (Pro- 



vincial); Mother M. Arcadius, C.P. 
(1st Consultor) ; Mother M. Dominic 
Mary, C.P. (2nd Consultor); Mother 
M. Bertrand, C.P. (Providence); 
Mother M. Gonzales, C.P. (Bristol); 
Mother M. Albeus, C.P. (Wakefield) ; 
Mother M. Clothilde, C.P. (Peace- 
dale) ; and Mother M. Berenice, C.P. 
(Wickford). 



FROM PASSIONISTS ABROAD 



Central Italy 

The magazine "II Crocifisso", pub- 
lished by the Passionist Fathers at 
Scala Santa, the Motherhouse of the 
Province of the Presentation has re- 
cently come to the office of The Pas- 
sionist. It is very well edited, is 
excellently illustrated and, for that 
reason, a very attractive magazine 
for the general public. 

From its pages, incidentally, we 
draw the information that the Col- 
lege of Postulators have requested 
the Holy See to name St. Vincent 
Mary Strambi their special patron. 
Meeting in the General House of the 
Jesuits in Rome, the Postulators of 
the respective religious orders voted 
to make this request of the Holy Fa- 
ther. 

St. Vincent Mary, C.P. is the first 
postulator to be raised to the honor 
of the Altar. He fulfilled the office of 
Postulator for 32 years, during that 
time arranging and developing the 
material in the cause of Our Holy 
Founder. 



Italy 

This year the Province of the 
Pieta celebrates the Centenary of 
its foundation. The Province of the 
Pieta stretches along the Adriatic 



Coast of North Central Italy for 
about 200 miles or more. It was 
established in 1851 by a Decree of 
the 19th General Chapter, compris- 
ing the Monasteries of Recanati, 
Isola del Gran Sasso. The new Pro- 
vince took its name from the title 
of its new Motherhouse, St. Mary of 
the Pieta, at Recanati. 

In the next dozen years, the Pro- 
vince grew and prospered. It added 
to its number the houses of St. James 
at Torre S Patrizio and the Annun- 
ciation at Giulianova, and it gave to 
the Congregation and the world a 
saint: St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful 
Virgin, who entered the Novitiate at 
Morrovale in 1856 and died in Isola 
in 1862. It was during these six 
years, however, that the scourge of 
war arose. 

With the annexation of the Mar- 
ches and the Abruzzi to Italy, the 
religious orders were suppressed, 
monasteries closed, and the religious 
dispersed and persecuted. 

It was twenty years before the 
tempest was past. 1882 saw the 
restoration of the religious orders, 
but not the property which had once 
belonged to them. The Province of 
the Pieta lost every one of its former 
monasteries, and was re-established 



148 



with four new ones: that of St. Eu- 
tizio at Soriano, Jesus and Mary at 
Moricone, Sacred Heart at Mandu- 
ria and that of the Visitation at S. 
Arcangelo di Romagna. Once again 
the Province began to grow. In 
1884 the Retreat of Madonna della 
Stella at Montefalco was added, and 
in 1886 that of S. Angelo in Pon- 
tano. In 1894 the Monastery at 
Isola was recovered, and another 
built at nearby Pontefelcino in 1898. 
The Retreat at Recanati was re- 
opened in 1902, forty years after it 
had been forcibly closed. The next 
year saw the foundation of a new 
house at Sammarcello. The restora- 
tion was glorious! 

The First World War brought more 
suffering to the Province of the Pie- 
ta. The young men were called into 
the Army, and some of the Monaster- 
ies were requisitioned for use as 
barracks. One again the tempest 
blew over. Morrovale was reopened 
in 1926. In 1940 a small foundation 
was begun at Grottammare, and in 
1943 construction began on the new 
Monastery at Cesta di Copparcv but 
already there were dangerous rum- 
blings of war right on Italian soil. 
In no time at all, the front had 
moved into the very Province of the 
Pieta. Its houses were again req- 
uisitioned for command posts and 
military barracks. The retreating 
Germans mined and destroyed the 
Monastery at S. Arcangelo di Ro- 
magna. 

The story of the Province of the 
Pieta might well be called the story 
of Calvary. However, Calvary is not 
an unfitting place for a Passionist. 
The truth of that fact lies in the 
saintly men that the Province has 



produced. Besides St. Gabriel, there 
is Fr. Bernard Silvrestrelli, one of 
his companions in the Novitiate, and 
a future General of the Order. There 
was the young Passionist priest, Fr. 
John of the Holy Spirit, and a stu- 
dent, Confrater Pius of St. Aloysius. 
Today the Province of the Pieta 
numbers ten Monasteries, 112 priests 
and 20 students preparing for the 
priesthood. There are 40 lay Broth- 
ers in the Province. To all and each 
the congratulations of the whole 
Congregation. The first hundred 
years, let us hope, have been the 
hardest. May the Province of the 
Pieta now reap the fruits of peace 
and prosperity! 



North Italy 

The Province of the Immaculate 
Heart has celebrated the Golden 
Jubilee of two of its members al- 
ready this year. Besides His Ex- 
cellency Bishop Peruzzo of the Dio- 
cese of Agrigento in Sicily, the Pro- 
vince extended its greetings to Rev. 
Fr. Felix of the Immaculate Virgin, 
C.P., on January 28, 1951. The rainy 
day in North Italy did not keep the 
crowds away from the Sanctuary of 
Santa Maria at Caravate. It was 
packed with Fr. Felix's many friends. 

The same Province will celebrate 
another Golden Jubilee this year. 
Father Aloysius of St. Charles, C.P., 
will mark his Fiftieth Anniversary 
on Sept. 21. 



Sicily 

The 14th of January, 1951 was a 
great day at Agrigento on the Island 
of Sicily. Most Rev. John Baptist 
Peruzzo, C.P., Bishop of Agrigento 



149 




Artist's drawing of the new Church 
and Retreat of St. Gemma, Madrid. 




celebrated his Golden Jubilee in the 
Holy Priesthood. His Excellency was 
originally a member of the Province 
of the Immaculate Heart of Mary, in 
North Italy. He was professed July 
26, 1894 and was ordained at Pia- 
nezza (January 13, 1901). He was 
made Auxiliary Bishop in the Dio- 
cese of Mantua January 5, 1924. 
From there he was transferred to the 
Diocese of Oppido Nuovo in 1928, and 
then to his present See of Agrigento, 
January 15, 1932. 

It was a joyful day, as members of 
the government, the clergy and peo- 
ple turned out for the celebration. 
All the Bishops of the Island were 
present, led by Cardinal Ruffini of 
Palermo. The Passionist sends its 
congratulations and best wishes to 
the Jubilarian. 



View of new St. Gemma Church and 
Retreat under construction. Yes, that 
is snow on the ground. 



Spain 

At Deusto, Spain beginning Janu- 
ary 15, 1951 Most Rev. Father Gen- 
eral presided at the Provincial Chap- 
ter of the Province of the Sacred 
Heart of Jesus. This Province em- 
braces the Spanish civil provinces of 
Vascongadas, Navarra and Galicia 
together with its houses in Peru and 
Colombia in South America. 

The results of the elections were as 
follows: Provincial, Very Rev. Fr. 
Ignatius of the Blessed Sacrament, 
C.P.; Consultors, Very Rev. Frs. Luis 
of la Soledad and Elias of the Sor- 
rowful Virgin; Rector of Deusto, Fr. 
Seraphin of la Merced; Rector of 
Angosto, Fr. Victor of the Ascen- 
sion; Rector of Mondonedo, Fr. Gu- 
mersind of the Incarnate Word; Rec- 
tor of Mellid, Fr. Jeremias of the 
Holy Thorns; Rector of Irun, Fr. Lu- 



150 




The Community of Sts. John and Paul, Penafiel, Spain with Msgr. Ubald Cibrian, 
the Missionaries of the new Prelature nullius, the Rectors of the Province of 
the Most Precious Blood and the Provincial and Consultors of the Sacred Heart 
Province. 





f% ^ 






r fi-m^ W-^i 


■n 




■■■■■■■■■ 






If ? s 


' $ 


1 


»•#■■' 


t 


t 


PfK 






% • 


% •'! 


1 1 


1 ' 


» * a. 


* ♦" 




'"Hi 


» * 


r 

4 % 


• 


/n \ 






t 








• 


i 


t^" r ^y 


t. 


■ — ■ i 


2 


4 




h 

lb 


^ 




1 1 




J 


H 


It' ■ ^ ■ yv 1 ' *, 






*%4 


















• 



Msgr. Ubald Cibrian with the Community of St. Paul of the Cross at Micros, 
Asturias, Spain. 



151 



cius of the Presentation; Rector of 
Caldas, Fr. Seraphin of the Heart 
of Mary; Rector of Lima, Fr. Pla- 
cid of the Virgin Mary; Rector of 
Bogota, Fr. Matthew of the Cross; 
Rector of Gaviria, Fr. Damian of the 
Heart of Mary; Master of Novices, 
Fr. Raymond of the Sorrowful Vir- 
gin. 

England 

The January 1951 issue of "The 
Cross" carries a brief death notice of 
Rev. Fr. Cuthbert Dunne, C.P., of 
St. Joseph's Province. Born in Dub- 
lin, Oct. 4th, 1869, he was professed 
in 1888, and after his ordination be- 
gan his varied career. First it took 
him to Australia, as Secretary to 
the Provincial. Later he was en- 
gaged in parochial work in Kimber- 
ly, South Africa, and in the Passion- 
ist Church, Avenue Hoche, Paris. He 
remained in Paris until 1902, when 
the Community was expelled by the 
anti-clerical legislation of the French 
Government. It was during his stay 
at the Passionist Church there that 
he became known all over the world 
as the young Passionist priest who 
received the dying Oscar Wilde back 
into the Church. R. I. P. 



The April issue, 1951, contains the 
obituary of Rev. Fr. Eustace M'Au- 
ley, C.P., who died February 13, at 
St. Gabriel's Retreat, The Graan, En- 
niskillen. Born in 1863, Fr. Eustace 
was ordained in 1898. Shortly after 
his Ordination, he was appointed to 
Avenue Hoche, Paris to minister to 
the needs of the English-speaking 
Catholics of the French capital. At 
the turn of the century he personally 
witnessed the compulsory closing of 



several convents, and the clashes 
that arose between the angry popu- 
lace and the military. The Pas- 
sionists, of course, shared the gen- 
eral fate, and the Community was 
expelled from Avenue Hoche. After 
some years at Highgate, London, Fa- 
ther Eustace found a new field of 
Labor at St. Louis, Missouri, where 
he spent the nine years 1905-1914. 
He had a vivid remembrance of the 
great enthusiasm with which Irish- 
Americans received the news of John 
Redmond's fight for Home Rule, and 
their keen disappointment when it 
failed to secure its object. Fr. Eus- 
tace was recalled to England in 1914. 
R. I. P. 



Spain 

The Province of the Most Precious 
Blood was greatly honored in the 
appointment of one of its members, 
Rev. Fr. Ubald, C.P., as the new Pre- 
late Nullius of the recently estab- 
lished Prelature of Corocoro, Bolivia. 
His Excellency was born near Bur- 
gos, Spain, December 22, 1906. 

The Prelature nullius of Corocoro 
was canonically erected in December 
of 1949, at the request of the Arch- 
bishop of La Paz. It is situated ap- 
proximately between 67 and 70 de- 
grees longitude and 16 to 18 degrees 
latitude, bordering on the countries 
of Peru and Chile. It also touches, 
therefore, Lake Titicaca, which is the 
highest inland lake in the world, 
some 10,000 feet above sea level. 



The Province is also in the process 
of constructing the new Retreat and 
Church of St. Gemma, at Madrid, 
of which we have been fortunate in 
obtaining pictures. 



152 



Ireland 

There has recently come to our 
notice a new "Hymn to St. Mary 
Goretti", published in the Province 
of St. Patrick. With words by "A 
Passionist Father" and music by 
Dermot McGuinness, the hymn 
makes a fine appearance. There is a 
definite Irish lilt and appeal to the 
piece, say those who have thus far 
seen the score. Copies may be ob- 
tained from The Passionist, or by 
writing to St. Patrick's Retreat, 
Wheatfield House, Crumlin Road, 
Belfast, Ireland. 



Belgium 

The Province of St. Gabriel cele- 
brated the Golden Jubilee of one of 
its Brothers, Brother Bernard (Den- 
ecker), C.P. on February 4, 1951. 
Brother Bernard is immediately 
ahead of Brother Romuald, C.P., of 
the Western Province, in the General 
Catalog. 



*$4 




BS#** % 


•icl 


^^"^"* j ^»i m ,M m 




mmmmmmmW 



His Excellency, Msgr. Fernand 
Cento, Apostolic Delegate Nuncio 
to Brussels has once more entered 
the Passionist horizon. His "Cham- 
pion of the Papacy" is a life of St. 
Vincent Strambi. It has drawn warm 
praise on every front, and has al- 
ready been translated into Portu- 
guese, Spanish and Italian, of which 
there are several editions. The 
French edition was published by the 
Passionist Fathers at Courtrai, Bel- 
gium. Here is a book that wants 
translating into English. 

His Excellency will be remembered 
from an earlier appearance in The 
Passionist, (September 1948) giving 
an account of his visit to the Pas- 
sionist Nuns of Tielt, Belgium. The 
Archbishop has always had a great 
devotion to St. Paul of the Cross and 
everything Passionist. It has once 
more shown itself in this new life of 
St. Vincent Strambi, "Champion of 
the Papacy." 



The Belgian Province is building a 
new Retreat at Louvain, in the Dio- 
cese of Malines. 



View of the beautiful Ostensorium and 
other gifts received by Fr. Victor on 
his Jubilee. 



Germany-Austria 

From Germany come the pictures 
of Very Rev. Father Victor Koch, 
C.P., on the 60th Anniversary of his 
Profession. Father Victor celebrat- 
ed the occasion December 3rd, 1950, 
with a Solemn Mass at Schwarzen- 
feld, Bavaria. He was assisted by 
Very Rev. Fr. Walter Mickel, C.P., 
Provincial, and Very Rev. Fr. Domi- 
nic Schedl, C.P., Rector of St. Gabri- 
el's Monastery at Munich-Pasing. 
The Clergy, civic authorities and a 
great many of the faithful crowded 



153 



to the scene of Fr. Victor's celebra- 
tion. 

Very Rev. Fr. Victor was born 
May 26, 1873 at Hermitage, Pa. It 
was in April 1889 that three Pas- 
sionist Missionaries — a German, an 
Italian and an American — gave a 
Mission at Sharon, Pa. and there 
young Nicholas went to hear them, 
consequently determining to enter 
the Preparatory Seminary at Dun- 
kirk. His life as a Student he spent 
at Louisville, Baltimore and West 
Hoboken. He was ordained Sept. 19, 
1896. Subsequent years he spent at 
St. Louis, Louisville, Pittsburgh, Cin- 



cinnati, Dunkirk and West Hoboken 
He spent some time as Pastor at St 
Francis Hieronymo Church in St 
Paul, Kansas, later was Rector ii 
Pittsburgh, and Pastor again in Bal 
timore. It was in 1922 that he wen 
to Bavaria to help begin the Germai 
foundation, and there he has spen 
the intervening years — some of then 
disastrous during World War II. Bo 
na cuncta fausta! 



Recently, Rev. Fr. Paul, C.P. con 
ducted a retreat at a convent o 
School Sisters. It was the first tim> 
that the Sisters had ever seen a Pas 




Very Rev. Fr. Victor's Diamond Jubilee. Seated (1. to r.) Very Rev. Fr. Walter 
C.P., Provincial ; the Jubilarian ; Very Rev. Fr. Francis, C.P., Rector of Schwarz 
enfeld, and Rev. Fr. Ignatius, Vicar. Standing, Very Rev. Fr. Dominic, Rector o 
Pasing; Brother Gabriel, Brother Bernhard, Rev. Fr. Adrian, Confr. Andreas 
and Rev. Fr. Frederick. 



154 



sionist. However, someone discov- make the Retreat even more of a 
ered a note in the Chronicle that the success. Very Rev. Fr. Victor, as- 
Convent had been dedicated to St. sisted by Rev. Fr. Roland, C.P., re- 
Paul of the Cross 52 years before! cently conducted a Mission for the 
It was a happy discovery and helped G.I.'s at Weiden-Oberpfalz. 




155 




aria 




By this time, most of our Readers 
have seen copies of "Selected Letters 
of Recent Passionist Generals", edit- 
ed by Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P., of 
Holy Cross Province. Several con- 
gratulatory notices have already 
come in. Most Rev. Fr. General has 
written: "Some time ago I received 
the volume "Selected Letters" by Fr. 
Matthew. It has given me, in fact 
the Curia here in Rome, great satis- 
faction. ... It will help immensely 
towards the fostering of, and the per- 
severing in the true spirit of the Pas- 
sionist Vocation. This work reflects 
credit on the whole Province of the 
Holy Cross, because it goes to show 
that over there is a real, earnest de- 
sire to keep alive our most essential 
Passionist characteristics." 

Fr. Matthew deserves much credit 
for being the driving force behind 
getting these Letters printed. The 
volume covers the years 1925-1950, 
and includes all the letters of our 
Generals that have a specific bearing 
on our spiritual life, while excluding 
merely "historical" letters, as Father 
points out in the Preface. Orders for 
the volume may be sent to The Pas- 
sionist, 1924 Newburg Road, Louis- 
ville (5), Kentucky. 



ance, published by Joseph F. Wag- 
ner, New York, in its Spring issue 
carried a beautiful four-page spread 
of Mater Dolorosa Laymen's Retreat 
House, in Sierra Madre, California. 
Pictures of the outside, inside, an 
aerial photo and floor plan combine 
to provide an excellent general view 
of our new Retreat House on the 
West Coast. 



Catholic Building and Mainten- 



The translation of "In Valle Quis- 
quis Aspera" that the readers of 
The Passionist have already seen on 
an earlier page of this issue, is the 
work of one of the Fathers of Holy 
Cross Province. We think it is very 
well done, both rhyming and met- 
ered. Of course, it is for private use 
only, until approved by a Bishop. It 
may be sung to the ordinary Gre- 
gorian melody, taken from the Feast 
of St. Paul of the Cross, or better, it 
may be sung to the tune of any ap- 
propriate O Salutaris melody. Of 
course, the translation of a liturgical 
hymn cannot be sung in the presence 
of the Blessed Sacrament exposed 
(SRC 3537, ad 3), and thus, though 
desirable, it seems it cannot be sung 
during our regular St. Paul's Novena 
in English. However, we have print- 
ed it in the Passionist in the hope 
that some of our English-speaking 



156 



Passionists may be able to find an 
appropriate place for it. 



Civil Service News, the National 
Civil Service Review, published at 
Dayton, Ohio, a monthly news bul- 
letin dedicated to the economic wel- 
fare of all Civil Service employees, 
is running serially "Our Lady of 
Fatima", taken from "The Challenge 
of Fatima," by Rev. Fr. Raphael who 
is stationed at Holy Cross Monas- 
tery, Cincinnati. Incidentally, "The 
Challenge of Fatima" has gone into 
another printing. "How Sweet Are 
These Tears," which is a pocket 
size biography of Mother Seton, the 
Foundress of the Sisters of Charity, 
is another of Fr. Raphael's pamph- 
lets that is enjoying a large sale — 
especially in schools conducted by the 
Sisters of Charity. Another recent 
pamphlet by Fr. Raphael, "St. Mary 
Goretti, A Twentieth Century St. 
Agnes" is a "natural". Its factual 
presentation and popular style have 
a great appeal for both young and 
old. It is highly recommended for 
pamphlet racks, and to the priestly 
and religious zeal of every Passion- 
ist. 



If you are searching for a good 
book for the Refectory, we can rec- 
ommend "The First Catholic Mission 
to the Australian Aborigines," by 
Rev. Fr. Osmund Thorpe, C.P., of 
the Australian Province. Though it 
is a superbly documented history of 
the first attempt to evangelize the 
"Blacks" of Australia (by four Pas- 
sionist Fathers from Italy), the Com- 
munity at Louisville found that the 
book often reads more like a novel, 



so interesting does it become at 
times. The volume contains 270 
pages, although the documentation 
appreciably shortens the actual read- 
ing matter. Copies may be obtained 
by writing The Passionist. 



Rev. Fr. Edwin Ronan, C.P. ap- 
peared in the March issue of The 
Priest with an article entitled "Shall 
it be a Mission?" It was a very 
timely and well written article, 
bringing out the practical aspects of 
the need and the preparation for 
Parish Missions during the Jubilee 
Year. Another excellent effort by 
Fr. Edwin is his pamphlet on Lay- 
men's Retreats, which appeared 
about the first of March. This is an 
excellent pamphlet for the pamphlet 
racks. It has been published in two 
editions, a Passionist edition slanted 
towards making our own Retreat 
Houses known, and a general edition 
that any Retreat group might use 
to advertise Lay Retreats and bring 
more of the Laity to make them. 
The pamphlet, together with Fr. Ed- 
win's earlier pamphlet, "Why The 
Family Rosary?" may be obtained 
by writing Fr. Edwin Ronan, C.P., 
Holy Cross Monastery, Mt. Adams, 
Cincinnati (2), Ohio, or by writing 
to The Grail, St. Meinrad, Indiana. 
Special discounts for large orders. 



Very Rev. Fr. Provincial, James 
Patrick, C.P., through one of our 
Brethren in Germany, has contacted 
a company that makes our Profes- 
sion Crucifixes. It is hoped that the 
finished product will arrive in this 
country in a month or two. This will 



157 



be welcome news for many of the 
younger members of the Province. 
The Profession Class of 1942 was the 
last class, all of whose members re- 
ceived a Profession Crucifix at the 
time of Profession. 



The new Mass for the Feast oi 
the Assumption may be obtained 
from Benziger Brothers. We have in- 
quired whether new Lessons have 
been published for the Office, but at 
this writing we have received nc 
word. 




158 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE. MARCH 1951 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 
Joseph M 
John Baptist 29 
Forrest 29 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 2 

Neil 3 

Joseph 4 

Camillus 5 

Kilian 7 

Benedict 

Cyril 

Augustine 

David K. 

Vincent X 

Norbert 

Alban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

Conrad 12 

Pius 

Alan 

Kenneth 

feonell 16 

Howard 

Benet 10 

Thaddeus 34 

Barnabas M 

Wm Gail 14 

Gregory Jos 13 

Leo Patrick 

Paul 42 

Godfrey 

Noel 10 

Keith 

Students 

Paul Mary 

\ugustine Paul 

Joachim 

lede 

kan 

rude 

Barry 

r. Francis 

/ictor 

Jail 



J. Gabriel 
Brothers 

Felix 
Gilbert 
Leo 
John 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert 5 

Egbert 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Ferdinand 

Sylvester 

Nicholas 15 

Cyprian F. 9 

Eustace 

Lambert 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Donald 

Robert 25 

Charles G. 23 

James 10 

Brothers 

Columban 
James 19 
William 22 

LOUISVILLE 

Gbrdian 5 

Bartholomew 7 

Adalbert 

Charles 

Lawrence 

Anselm 9 

Andrew 

Thomas 

Hubert 37 

Marion 

Arnold 

Robert B. 

Alfred 

Flannon 

Kilian 



Roger 34, 36 
John 38 
Fergus 10 
Warren 

Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Michael 

Ward 

Bernardine 

Dominic 

Venard 

Caspar 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Brothers 

Luke 22 

Gabriel 27 

Casimir 20 

Denis 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 7 
Celestine 40 
John Philip 
Aloysius 
Herbert 41 
Kevin 
Claude 
Edgar 41 
Ervan 41 
Anthony Mali 
Germain 41 
Cyprian 41 
William Jos 41 
Emil 41 
Roch 41. :m 
Joel 41 
Leon 

Campion 41 
Raymond 41 

Brothers 

Bernard 19 
Conrad 22 



Regis 20 
David 21 

ST. PAUL 

Elmer 5 

Faustinus 6 

Cormac 7 

Matthew M 

Hyacinth 

Julian 

Edward 

George 

Christopher ! 

Brendan 10 

Leopold 

Jeremias 

Paschal 

Wilfrid 

Alvin 11 

Brothers 

Louis 22 
Philip 19 
Charles 

Novices 

Raphael 
Alphonsus 



M 



Benedict 
Theodore 
Colman 
Owen 
Francis 
Philip 
Kenan 
Gerald 
Casimir 
Sebastian 
Bro. Justin 
Bro. Robert 
Bro. Joachim 
Bro. Francis 
Bro. Leonard 
Bit). Paul 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 
Miles 7 
Ignatius 

.Justin 



Louis 

Malachy 

Hilary 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Matthew V 34 

Regis 

Ignatius B 30 

Ronan 

Thomas More 31 

Frederick 32 

Jordan 

Rene 

Columban 28 

Students 

Myron 

Denis 

Albert 

Eugene 

Meinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 

Francis Martin 

Carl Anthony 

Gerard 

Peter 

Michael Jos. 

Brothers 

Romuald 
Joseph 
Thomas 
George 

DETROIT 

Julius 5 

Ralph 7 

David F. 

Alexis 

Gerald 

Ajigelo 25 

Linus 

Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Urban 

Timothy 



159 



Roland 


Philip 


Gregory Mc 


Canisius 


Valentine 


Austin 


Terrence 


Carl 10 


Fidelis 


Aidan 


Brice 




Patrick 9 


Joyce 17 


Bro. Henry 


FAIRFIELD 


Theophane 


Ed. Guido 


SACRAMENTO 


Edmund 9 


Colum 


Ernest 


Basil 5 




Mel 


Isidore 23 


Damian 23 


CHINA 


Nilus 
Roderick 


Stephen 25 


Dunstan 


Anthony Mai 47 


Harold 


Sacred Eloquence 


Henry 


William W. 18 


Declan 23 


Carroll 


Jerome 25 


Cyprian L. 18 


Brothers 

Aloysius 


Randal 
Firmian 


Bro. Anthony 
Bro. Patrick 


James L. 49 
Francis Fl. 18 


Theodore 


Clyde 


HOUSTON 


Harold Trav. 18 




Loran 


Conleth 8 




SIERRA MADRE 


Simon 


Stanislaus 


CHAPLAINS 


Herman 5 
Paul Francis 7 


Brothers 

Richard 


Bertrand 
Clarence 


Fabian 43 
Leonard 44 


Reginald 
Gabriel 24 


John Aelred 


Xavier 45 


Gerald 


Bro. Daniel 


Brian 46 


Maurice 26 
Leo 9 


BIRMINGHAM 


ENSLEY 


Cyril M. 48 
Reginald J. 50 


Canute 8 


Nathanael 9 


Kenny 51 


Martin 


Cornelius 


Ludger 


Lucian 52 



1. First General Consultor, SS. 
e Paolo, Rome (147), Italy 

2. Provincial 

3. I Consultor 

4. II Consultor 

5. Rector 

6. Master of Novices 

7. Vicar 

8. Superior 

9. Pastor 

10. Assistant Pastor 

11. Vice Master 

12. Lector of Church History 

13. Lector of Dogma 

14. Chaplain at Dunning 

15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 

16. Provincial Secretary 

17. Director of Students 

18. Catholic Mission, Yuanling, 
China 

19. Cook 

20. Tailor, Infirmarian 

21. Refectorian 

22. Outside Brother 

23. Retreat Director 

24. Assistant Retreat Director 

25. Retreat Master 

26. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 

27. Porter 

28. Lector of History 

160 



REFERENCES 

Giovanni 29. University Students 

30. Lector of English, II Phil. 

31. Lector of I Phil; Hist, of Phil. 

32. Lector of III Phil; Apologetics 

33. All around Brother 

34. Director 

35. Sign Fieldman 

36. Lector of Scripture, Passion 

37. Lector of Canon Law, Pastoral 

38. Moral III & IV 

39. Assistant Cook 

40. Chaplain, St. Vincent's 

41. Lector 

42. Vocational Director 

43. 723 5th Ave., Kalispell, Mont. 

44. Veterans Administration 
P.O. Box 9821, Aspinwall, Pa. 

45. Catholic Chaplain, U.S. Naval Hospital, 
Hunan, Chelsea, Mass. 

46. Catholic Chaplain, U.S. Naval Station, 
Atak, Alaska 

47. Maryknoll House, Stanley, Hong Kong 

48. Chap. Cyril Jablanovsky (Capt 0525320) 
Hq. 2nd Armored Div. Fort Hood, 
Texas. 

49. The Sign, Union City, N.J. 

50. Sick Leave 

51. 6103 ASU Branch USDB Lompoc, Cal- 
ifornia 

52. U.S. Naval Traning Center Bainbridge, 
Maryland 



— T 



Obtainable from 

"1U PaUiOHiti" 



1) Masses of the Passion (English) 

2) Mass of St. Gemma (Latin for large Missal) 

3) Office of St. Gemma (limited supply) 

4) "God's Own Method" by Fr. Aloysius, C.P. 

5) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis C.P. 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

8) Order to be observed by C.P. Choir at High-or Solemn Mass 

9) Passionist Bulletin (Nos. 19-28) bound 

10) "THE PASSIONIST" 1948, 1949, bound 

11) Mary's Cavalier (St. Gabriel) by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P. 

13) Voice and Speech Routine by Fr. Conleth, C.P. 

14) First Catholic Mission to the Australian Aborigines, by Fr. 

Osmund, C.P. 

15) Hymn to St. Mary Goretti. 

16) "Selected Letters of Recent Passionist Generals" edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P. 




BULLETIN OF HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 



mm 





THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished quarterly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each March, 
June, September, and Decem- 
ber. Financed by free-will of- 
ferings of its readers. There 
is no Copyright. The paper is 
a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. Contributions of our 
Missionaries to the Mission- 
ary Forum are invited. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Vox Patris 161 

Vexilla Regis 162 

Passionist Diet 169 

Humility 174 

Fr. Louis, C.P 179 

Ius Particulare 182 

Way of Divine Love 186 

Chapter Decrees 190 

Customs 197 

News Review 201 

Eastern Province 211 

Provinces Abroad 218 

Bulletin Board 233 

Works of Ministry 235 

Who's Who 241 



VOX PATRIS 



Paul of the Cross, General of the 
Congregation of the Most Holy Pas- 
sion of Jesus Christ. 



UPON learning for certain that 
our beloved brethren and sons 
do not have enough liberty to write 
and have recourse to the Major 
Superiors, such as the General, the 
Provincial, and the General and 
Provincial Consultors, we feel es- 
pecially bound in conscience to set 
forth the following decrees to end 
the disorder: 

1. We order and command all 
the Rev. Fr. Rectors to read all the 
letters of their subjects, nemine 
excepto, whenever they come or go 
either by post or not by post, except 
those which are addressed to the 
Fr. Missionaries when they have 
just recently returned from Mis- 
sions. At other times the Fr. Rec- 
tors are free to read them or not. 

2. We forbid the Fr. Rectors to 
hinder their subjects from writing 
to Fr. General and the other Major 
Superiors, directly or indirectly by 
any sign or threat. The Fr. Rec- 
tors are strictly forbidden, even 
under precept of obedience, to 
open or read the letters from the 
Major Superiors to their subjects or 
those of their subjects directed to 
the Major Superiors. 




3. We exhort the Fr. Rectors that 
as an obligation in conscience iuxta 
7-egulas they do not permit the Re- 
ligious to go out alone without a 
companion, which is a very serious 
thing, except in the case of a neces- 
sary quest, provided that the sub- 
ject they send for the quest be a 
religious firm in the fear of God; 
and we order with all rigor that 
when the brothers come home from 
the quest they make a retreat of 
six or eight days, without being em- 
ployed in anything but what is nec- 
essary in the Retreat. 

4. Finally, we command that 
these our decrees be exactly ob- 
served. We command the Very Rev. 
Fr. Provincial to be vigilant for 
its exact observance, and we re- 
serve the punishment of transgres- 
sors, Rectors as well as other sub- 

(Continued on page 178) 



161 



(•(• 



\UextM 



a 



vfapa 



99 



AN ARTICLE SUMMING 
UP THE CURRENT 
OPINIONS IN REGARD 
TO THE CROSS OF 
CHRIST 

By 

SIMON McKENNA, C.P. 



IN THE "Vexilla Regis" of Good 
Friday, and its triumphant coun- 
terpart, the Feast of the Exalta- 
tion of the Holy Cross, September 
14th, the Church sings the praises 
of the Cross of Christ. Each suc- 
ceeding stanza portrays the Cross 
with a more glorious, poetic em- 
bellishment. Bridging the gulf of 
time and eternity, the Cross is en- 
visaged in the spotlight of Glory, 
as the Angels might sing in Heaven. 
Nevertheless, it is yet possible to 
view the Cross in all its import, 
as Mary and John saw it on Cal- 

162 




vary, or as St. Paul saw it when he 
penned those words brimming with 
meaning : "he humbled himself, be- 
coming obedient to death, even to 
the death of the cross." The bright- 
ness of historical truths, authentic 
and contemporaneous documents 
and competent authorities can dis- 
pel the darkness of time, and in all 
its resplendent beauty and awful 
implications we can see the true 
"Vexilla Regis." 

Previous to the death of Christ 
the cross, though still a compara- 
tively unfamilar object in Palestine, 



was synonymous with the lowest 
depths of degradation. Cicero re- 
fers to it as the "servile supplicium" 
(1) and as the "servitutis extremum 
summumque supplicium" (2). Its 
use as a form of punishment came 
to the Holy Land with the Roman 
invaders. Previous to this innova- 
tion, death by stoning was the ordi- 
nary form of punishment meted 
out to capital offenders among the 
Jews. (3) After the Roman con- 
quest, however, death by crucifixion 
was introduced, more particularly 
for those who could not prove their 
Roman citizenship. Later it was 
reserved for thieves and malefac- 
tors. (4) According to Roman cus- 
tom crucifixion was always preceded 
by scourging (5), after which the 
victim had to carry the cross, or at 
least the patibulum or cross-beam 
to the place of execution. (6) We 
know certainly that Christ was 
scourged, but did he carry the whole 
cross or merely the cross-beam? 

The Greek word arahpos as 
used in the Gospel text (Mk. 15,21) 
does not necessarily mean the whole 
cross. According to Zorrel, it may 
mean "an upright beam" or "an up- 
right beam to which is joined a 
transverse beam," or figuratively, 
"the cross of Christ." (7) Lagrange 
is of the opinion that the word in 
this case might mean merely the 
patibulum. (8) He argues that it 
was the recognized Roman custom 
for the condemned to carry the cros- 
beam or "patibulum." Quoting 



Plutarch in favor of this inter- 
pretation, Lagrange notes that he 
uses the word (navpos in the sense 
of "patibulum." 

Moreover, since St. Mark was 
writing for the Romans, Lagrange 
observes that in this case the Evan- 
gelist might have used the term to 
mean "patibulum" or cross-beam. 
That Christ carried only the cross- 
beam is also the opinion of Voste 
(10) and Holzmeister (11). 

The foregoing opinion is by no 
means unfounded. Dr. Barbet says 
that to carry or drag the entire 
gibbet the 600 yards or so to Cal- 
vary would have been out of the 
question for one so weakened as 
was Jesus under the mental stress 
of the Agony, the Scourging, the 
Crowning with Thorns, and the long 
fast of twelve hours. (12) Never- 
theless he did bear some portion of 
the Cross, in all probability the 
cross-beam. Even this much was 
in accordance with the law and 
practice of the Romans, for Plautus, 
referring to the victim of the cruci- 
fixion, writes: "Let (the con- 
demned person) carry the cross- 
beam through the city, and then 
be fastened to the cross." (13) 
Thus, neither in Roman custom nor 
in the Gospel text is there any- 
thing which seems to contradict 
the supposition that Christ carried 
only the cross-beam to Calvary. 
On the contrary, this mode of pro- 
cedure would have been more in 
accordance with reason and pru- 



163 



dence, in Our Lord's case, since it 
was the avowed mind of the Jews 
that he should not die until he had 
suffered the supreme degradation of 
the cross. 

The Gospels do not state precisely 
how Jesus was nailed to the cross. 
It would seem that in this respect 
likewise he was the victim of Roman 
custom and practice. The Romans 
would raise the cross after the ar- 
rival of the victim at the place of 
execution. (14) He was then bound 
to it with cords, (15) and finally 
fastened to the wood with nails. 
(16) It is important to note, how- 
ever, that the Latin word "crux" 
used by the authors quoted was ap- 
plied to the upright pole only. (17) 
Therefore, since it seems that 
Christ carried only a portion of the 
Cross, the upright pole, in his case, 
would have been in position prior 
to his arrival on Calvary. This is 
confirmed by Pere Lagrange, who 
remarks : "The Crucifixion was con- 
ducted in the Roman manner. That 
is to say, the upright pole was al- 
ready fixed in place at the site of 
the execution, and the condemned 
man carried the traverse beam from 
the place of condemnation." (18) 

Continuing his description of the 
crucifixion, Lagrange says that the 
cross-beam, to which the hands of 
the Divine Victim were nailed, was 
then raised aloft and fixed to the 
vertical pole. This mode of pro- 
cedure would have been the easier 
way, and as such would have been 



chosen by the executioners. 

The advantage of this method 
may be better understood when one 
considers that Christ's cross was 
probably fitted with a "sedile" — a 
kind of seat upon which the suffer- 
er could be placed. This feature 
of crucifixion was certainly used at 
Roman and Greek crucifixions. 
Clear, precise references to it are 
found in the writings of the an- 
cient Fathers. St. Justin, who lived 
when the cross was still used for the 
death penalty, thus refers to the 
"sedile" in his description of Our 
Lord's cross : ". . . . in the middle 
is placed a projection resembling 
a horn and intended as a sort of seat 
for the Crucified." (19) Saint 
Irenaeus likewise affirms that the 
cross of Our Lord had five extremi- 
ties : ". . . . one in the center to, 
support the weight of the Cruci- 
fied." (20) Tertullian agrees with 
these opinions, likewise comparing 
the support to a horn. (21) These 
opinions carry weight when it is 
remembered that their authors 
seem to be describing crosses that 
they had seen in actual executions. 
St. Justin's words are important 
because he died in 168 A.D., and 
was a native of Palestine, where: 
even to this day, "in spite of the 
fourth attempt to westernize it, the 
country remains remarkably un- 
changed." (22) If this be true to- 
day, there seems less reason to 
doubt that the crosses used in St. 
Justin's time differed substantially 



164 



from those used in the time of 
Christ, scarcely over a hundred 
years previously. Nor are these the 
only authorities in favor of the 
opinion that the cross in use among 
the Romans at the time of Christ 
was furnished with a "sedile." 

Roman and Greek writers make 
use of idiomatic expressions that 
attest to the use of such a support, 
evidently some distance from the 
ground. They make use of such ex- 
pressions as the following : "to leap 
upon, the climb up, to ride upon the 
cross ; to sit on the sharp cross ; to 
rest upon it." (23) The Greeks 
speak of lifting a person up to the 
cross, while Josephus, writing of 
the time of Christ, speaks of "push- 
ing or lifting up" the condemned 
man to the cross. (24) Such ex- 
pressions seem to indicate that 
there was some instrument, at a 
height some distance from the 
ground, on which the victim was 
intended to rest or sit, and strongly 
favor the existence of a "sedile" 
on the cross. 

The "sedile" has a special pur- 
pose. It greatly facilitated the exe- 
cution, in as much as it bore most 
of the body's weight. (25) Thus 
the horizontal beam could more eas- 
ily be pushed into position. It also 
helped to fulfill the ends of Roman 
crucifixion. According to Roman 
usage, the body of the victim was 
to remain on the cross until it de- 
composed. Without the supporting 
"sedile," the nailed hands alone 



could not have supported the corpse, 
once the members had begun to de- 
cay. (26) Although Christ was not 
to remain on the cross so long as 
this, due to the Jewish fear for the 
great Sabbath, His cross, never- 
theless would still have been the 
regular Roman cross fitted with a 
"sedile." The "sedile" however, has 
never been depicted in Christian 
art, for reasons of decency and re- 
spect, and this, no doubt, had great- 
ly strengthened the aspersions cast 
on this unfamiliar feature of the 
Crucifixion. 

The "sedile" therefore would 
have been a valuable asset for se- 
curing the semi-crucified body of 
Christ to the upright pole. To this 
seat he would first have been raised 
or lifted with ropes, as indicated in 
the above phrases. Then, according 
to custom, he would have been tied 
to the cross with a rope about his 
waist. This latter action was sup- 
posed to have the magical effect of 
quieting the contortions and writh- 
ing of the victim, but its real pur- 
pose was to keep him from working 
himself off the "sedile." In this 
manner securely suspended on the 
cross, the feet of the Divine Vic- 
tim and the cross-beam could now 
be firmly attached and nailed in 
position. 

The joint with the upright could 
be accomplished in two ways, name- 
ly by dropping the cross-beam into 
a socket on top the upright pole, 
thus giving the T-shaped cross, the 



165 



"crux commissa"; or by fastening 
it across the upright, giving the 
Latin cross or the "crux immissa." 
In determining the type of cross 
used in the execution of Christ, 
we must bear in mind that his 
cross was,%s we have seen, proba- 
bly fitted with a "sedile." On this 
hypothesis the T-shaped cross seems 
very improbable, since the use of 
a "sedile" upon such a cross would 
involve no small amount of difficulty. 
St. Irenaeus and Tertullian are con- 
sistent in their affirmation that the 
"sedile" was definitely "in the cen- 
ter of the cross," and not "on the 
lower part," as Van Steenkiste apt- 
ly points out. Since the distance 
from the ground to the "sedile" 
was much greater than that from 
the "sedile" to the sacred shoulders, 
the cross-beam would necessarily 
intersect the upright some distance 
below its summit. Under such con- 
ditions the admittance of a "crux 
commissa" does not seem likely. 

Likewise, the fact that the Title 
was placed over the head of Christ 
seems to favor the "crux immissa." 
In his Gospel, St. Matthew states: 
"And they put above his head the 
charge against him, written: This 
is Jesus the King of the Jews." (27) 
On a "crux commissa" where could 
this title be placed? Not on the 
cross-beam, because as Christ sat 
on a "sedile," his arms were stretch- 
ed horizontally across the cross- 
beam (28), so that the top-most 
edge of the beam must have remain- 



ed some eight inches, at least, be- 
low the thorn-encased head. Since 
the inscription, though only about 
eight inches in height (30), was 
read and understood by the Jews, 
(29) it must have been placed 
conspicuously over the head of. 
Christ. According to Dom Calmet: 
"The prolongation of the cross, to 
which the Title was fixed, was mere- 
ly a stake bearing a board on which 
the words were graved." (31) Thus, 
if Christ were crucified on a "crux 
commissa," the title of necessity 
would have to be raised above his 
head by using such a stake. How- 
ever, complete silence surrounds 
this instrument in question. (32) 
It does not seem likely that such an 
important feature of the Sacred 
Passion would have been lost from 
the very beginning, while a more 
perishable and smaller relic, such 
as the sponge, was kept. 

These conclusions, though only 
conjectural, seem to imply that the 
Title was placed above our Lord's 
head, not on a stake, but on the up- 
right pole itself, on the projecting 
portion of the "crux immissa" 

With the exclusion of the "crux 
commissa," the "crux immissa" 
may be posited at the more probable 
shape of the true cross. This is the 
more popular opinion and is fre- 
quently found in the writings of the 
Saints and secular historians. 

St. Justin and St. Irenaeus, both 
of whom were in close contact with 



166 



apostolic times, state that the cross 
of Christ consisted of five extremi- 
ties, including the "sedile." St. 
Justin writes: "It is a straight 
piece of wood, its upper end rising 
like a horn when another beam is 
fastened to it; on each side, two 
other horns, forming the extremi- 
ties, appear joined to the first. In 
the middle is placed a horn, intend- 
ed to be a sort of seat for the cruci- 
fied." (34) The testimony of St. 
Irenaeus (140-202 A.D.) is perhaps 
even more important and stringent 
than that of St. Justin, as being a 
disciple of St. Polycarp, who was 
himself a hearer of St. John, and his 
testimony may be taken as a last 
echo of the Beloved Disciple. De- 
scribing the cross, he writes : "The 
cross had five extremities or sum- 
mits, in length two, in breadth two, 
and in the center another to sup- 
port the Body of the Crucified." 
(35) Tertullian expresses himself 
similarly when he compares the 
Cross to a mast with its yard at- 
tached. (36) 

Before concluding, it is worth 
noting the similes used by certain 
Saints in their references to the 



cross of Christ. St. Jerome com- 
pares it to a man swimming or a 
bird flying. (Comm. in S. Marc. 
XI) St Justin likens it to Moses 
praying with outstretched arms 
(Dial, c, Tryphone, 90), while St. 
Maximus of Turin sees the form 
of a cross in the four cardinal points 
of the compass (De cruce Domini, 
Horn. 3). (37) One cannot fail to 
notice the similarity in all these 
expressions. All indicate the Latin 
cross, and together with the numer- 
ous other quotations given above 
seem to ratify the more popular 
opinion concerning the form of the 
True Cross. The ancient historians 
Socrates, Theodoret and Eusebius 
likewise maintain that the Cross of 
Christ had the shape of the Latin 
cross. It is also interesting to note 
that this is the form of the cross 
in the miraculous picture of Our 
Lady of Perpetual Succour, attri- 
buted to St. Luke. 

Something of the awful implica- 
tions of the Roman cross can now 
be understood. It was an instru- 
ment which, though, simply fash- 
ioned, was evidently intended to ful- 
fill with exact precision the grue- 



l Pro Cluent., 66. 2 In Verrem, 66. 8 Lev. 20. 2-27. 4 Josephus. Antiq. 20. vi, 2. 
5 Prud. Enchirid. xli, 1. <; Plautus. Tard. dei vind. ix ; Artemid. II, xli. 7 Lexicon Graec. 
N.T. p. 1229. 8 Evangile selon S. Marc, xv, 21, p. 424. 9 De Ser. Num. Vind.. p. 554. 10 De 
Passione et Moret Jesu Christi, III, p 298. 11 Verbum Domini, May 1984, p. 1160. 12 Quoted 
in "The Death Image of Christ," by Fr. McEvoy, O.P., p. 75-76. 18 Carbonaria, 2. 14 Cicero, 
In Verr. v, 66. 15 Pliny. Hist. Nat., xxviii. 4. Hi Seneca, Vita Beat.. 19. 17 Marucchi. 
Catholic Encyclopedia, Vol. IV. Art. "Cross." p. 619. 18 Lagrange, ibid. in Dial. c. Tryphone. 
91. 20 Contra Haereses. II, IV. 21 Ad Nationes. 1. 12. 22 H. V. Morton, "In the Steps of 
the Master," Introduction. 28 Quoted in Van Stockist*. Comm. in S. Matt. p. 1090. 21 Antiq., 
xx. 6. 28 Van Steenkiste, op. c i t . . p. 1091. 2.; Id., ibid. 27 Matt. 27. 87. 2s Van 

Steenkiste. ibid. 2i) John 19. 20. 80 B. de Floury. Memoire sur les instruments do la Passion. 
81 Quoted by Loius de Combos in "The finding of the Cross." p. To. B2 De Obit. Theod., 
3.) Hoom. 85 in Joan. I. 34 Dial. c. Trph.. 91. 86 Contra Haereses. II. 1. 80 Ad Nat. I. 12. 
61 For further examples of this kind see Friedlieb: "Archeolonie de la Passion." (Fr. Trans, 
by Martin, p. 55). 38 J. Hoppenot: Le Crucifix, p. 21. 

167 



some aims of crucifixion. While Lord, with Mary and St. John we 

the light of authority and historical can see and understand the beauty 

fact dispels much of the bewildering and awf ulness of that cross — the 

shadows which time and distance triumphant banner of the King of 

have cast around the cross of Our Glory — the "Vexilla Regis." 




"THANK YOU" 

"Your face reminded me of Maria, for you resemble her surprisingly, both 
in countenance and in soul, that is, character. I express my approval of the film. 
At first, I was not reconciled to it, but now, after seeing all the good it has 
done, I accept it. I am not prejudiced against it, even if my role in the film is 
what it is, even if I felt myself condemned a second time. There is a con- 
demnation that comes from my conscience, overcome with horror at what I 
have done, which, even after 48 years, I still cannot explain. Perhaps the devil 
was in me, as Maria always said.... 

It seemed to me that our rendezvous in heaven, which Maria gave me to- 
gether with her pardon just a few moments before her death, has once more 
been promised me at the sound of your voice, in the final scene of the film. 
It is the hope of this pardon that give me the strength to endure my sorry, 
miserable life which can never redeem what I have done. I accept the film as 
a new punishment from God, and I thank you for it." 

Allesandro Serenelli 



(Translation of a letter from Allesandro Serenelli to Inez Orsini, the actress 
who played the part of St. Mary Goretti, in the Italian Rim, "Cielo sulla palude." 
The above letter was dated October 16, 1950, at Ascoli Piceno, where Allesandro 
Serenelli lives a humble life of penance with the Capuchin Fathers.) 



168 



HfftLTH 






and the 

PflSSIOniST DIET 

B nattier £imcm Ma/uf,, G.P. 



V: PRESCRIBED DIETARY 
TREATMENT. 

PROPER nutrition not only pro- 
motes and maintains bodily 
health but it is also a curative 
means in certain types of seemingly 
chronic ailments. In fact, recovery 
in such conditions depends more on 
a corrective diet than the prescribed 
medication, since such medication 
of itself can be quite useless with- 
out a rigid adherence to a special- 
ized diet. Among the many organic 
disturbances and diseases now be- 
ing treated quite extensively by 
diet are ulcers of the digestive 
tract: gall bladder infections; dia- 
betis ; skin eruptions ; colon irrita- 
tions; anemia; kidney ailments; 
heart conditions and high blood 
pressure, especially where over- 
weight is a specific factor. 



DIETS IN THE RELIGIOUS 
LIFE. 

In the past, corrective diets have 
suffered a degree of odium. The 
practice has at times been frowned 
upon and questioned. There is no 
doubt but that such a disdain has 
been due to an easily acquired mis- 
understanding concerning the na- 
ture and the need of such diets. 

There are very good reasons why 
this phase of nutrition in the re- 
ligious life must be given a practical 
and sympathetic consideration. 
Firstly, there is the widely recog- 
nized need for corrective diets as 
very essential treatments in vari- 
ous bodily disorders. Secondly, 
since a real appreciation of the 
importance of such diets in the 
care of the sick is lacking, there 
arises a tendency to look upon the 
dieter as an eccentric and his diet 
a needless annoyance to those con- 
cerned with it. Thirdly, the one 
victimized, so to speak, by a diet, 
takes a look at the diet chart pro- 
posed for him and immediately 
figures that the procedure is so 
involved, it would be an imposition 
on the Brother to have it prepared, 
especially on schedule. Fourthly, 
such a dieter very often hesitates 
to present his diet problem to the 
Superior lest the famous old bug- 
bear roar its head, that of being 
looked upon as 'singular.' Fifthly, 
religious who arc greatly dependent 
upon a specialized diet often justi- 
fiably complain that it is difficult 

169 



to have the diet properly prepared. 
Thus they end up by getting along 
as best they can without the full 
benefit of the diet and the result 
is the inevitable curtailment of their 
physical usefulness. 

All this adds up to an unneces- 
sary hardship for the religious 
whose recovery and subsequent 
worth to the community depends 
largely on dietary treatment. For- 
tunately, we Passionists are get- 
ting away from the idea that be- 
cause a religious is placed on a 
diet by a doctor he is therefore a 
hypocondriac or at least that a 
diet is nothing more than a passing 
whim of a sick individual. There 
are so many instances at the present 
time where corrective diets are ac- 
complishing what medication of it- 
self cannot do, that it would be 
foolish on our part not to admit the 
need of such treatment, especially 
when the medical profession itself 
attaches so great an importance 
to it. 

ATTITUDE OF ST. PAUL OF 

THE CROSS. 

At first glance it may seem that 
corrective diets are not exactly com- 
patible with our penitential mode 
of life. Or is it so important to 
stress the application of modern 
nutritional principles in our Pas- 
sionist life? Our Holy Founder 
thought so. It is true there was not 
the scientific outlook and practice 
in the field of corrective diets in 
his day to the extent that we possess 



it today. Nevertheless, it is en- 
lightening and encouraging to know 
that the 'Great Penitent' was ex- 
tremely solicitous as regards proper 
foods for his sick brethren even to 
concerning himself with minute de- 
tails. 

Again we are indebted to the 
writings of Father Cajetan to 
learn what our Holy Founder had 
to say on this point. 

"When a religious was sick, the 
Servant of God hastened to pro- 
cure suitable remedies for him. 
At this time according to the 
Rule, only on account of sickness 
could a religious eat meat. And 
so, when in 1765 an epidemic 
broke out a second time at the 
retreat of St. Angelo and a great 
many of the religious fell ill, the 
Servant of God, on the advice of 
the doctor, permitted meat to be 
eaten (for a time) . In the process 
of Canonization we read likewise 
that the Saint allowed meat to 
a Father suffering from stomach 
trouble; similarly to the com- 
munity of St. Eustace, all the 
members of which, with the ex- j 
ception of one or two, were ill." 
" 'I hope,' writes the Saint to a 
Rector, 'that our sick will be 
well by now. However, let them 
be on their guard, especially your 
Reverence, for those who are 
cured thanks to quinine are sub- 
ject to relapses. Let them avoid 
eating sour things and other in- 
digestible foods.' " 



170 



"Their food was to be prepared 
in a way that they might derive 
every desirable relief. To make 
sure he often went to the kit- 
chen. Nothing was to be omitted, 
he used to say, that could solace 
them, nor was anything to be 
cut down in the doctor's pre- 
scription." 

"At the retreat of the Presenta- 
tion, three or four religious were 
ill. Father Paul asked Brother 
Joseph, cook and infirmarian, 
what he had served them. 'Bread 
and oil soup,' responds the broth- 
er, 'because there was no bouil- 
lon.' In the ardor of his charity, 
Father Paul replied, 'That is no 
way to treat the poor sick.' " 
"In the regulations which the 
Saint composed and established 
in the Congregation, he devotes 
an entire chapter to instructing 
the infirmarian on how he should 
acquit himself of his office." 
Among other things there is 
this injunction: "Let him (the 
infirmarian) often take a look in 
the kitchen to see that the food 
is prepared becomingly and prop- 
erly seasoned." 

And precisely to the point under 
consideration here is his admoni- 
tion : "Let him not allow him- 
self to be led, through false com- 
passion, to give foods forbidden 
by the doctor." 
So it is to be seen that our Holy 
Founder wisely understood the im- 
portance of proper foods or to use 



the modern term, diets, in caring 
for the sick. This should dispel any 
doubt whatsoever concerning the 
significance of corrective dietary 
practice in our Passionist way of 
life. 

THE BROTHER'S RESPONSI- 
BILITY. 

The responsibility of providing 
necessary diets for the sick religious 
falls for the most part on the Broth- 
er in charge of the sick, that is the 
Brother Infirmarian. His office is 
to look after the unwell in the house 
and consequently he is naturally 
in the best position to render such 
service. However, it is not always 
plain sailing for the Brother, no 
matter how anxious he is to fulfill 
his obligation with both competence 
and charity. Very often a religious 
who is compelled to diet tends to 
minimize the importance of his diet 
and the attention needed, precisely 
because while he is not perfectly 
well, still and all he is not noticeably 
ill. While this is a natural and hu- 
man reaction it can also be quite 
a trial to the Brother. A Brother 
frequently has to call on his spirit 
of faith to remain steadfast in his 
attention despite the attitude of 
such a patient. 

At times, the Infirmarian does 
not actually prepare the food for 
the diet but he should assist the 
Brother Cook in every way possible, 
as our Holy Founder has pointed 
out. He can lighten the cook's bur- 
den by relieving him of the many 



171 



small details associated with the 
preparation of the various diets, 
especially in view of the fact that 
the specialized dishes are laid out 
at a very difficult time — serving 
time. 

Now it happens more frequently 
than is realized that a religious fails 
to receive the full benefit of a 
corrective diet because a Brother 
finds it difficult to interpret such 
a diet. The procedure can become 
very confusing and cause a willing 
but uninformed Brother quite a 
headache. Yet the fundamental 
principles involved are really simple 
ones. 

The nutritional foundation upon 
which all corrective diets rest is 
the classification of foods into their 
respective groups. In a previous 
article, (December 1950), foods 
were classified according to their 
protein, carbohydrate, fat, mineral 
and vitamin content. 

In order for one to properly pre- 
pare special diets he must famil- 
iarize himself with the following 
terms relating to classes of food: 
Bland, Rough, Strongly-flavored, 
Fatty, Fried and High Carbohy- 
drate foods. 

Some of these terms define them- 
selves while others need a few words 
of explanation. 

BLAND as the term signifies, re- 
fers to the soothing, mildly- 
flavored foods that are easily 
handled by the digestive system. 
Such foods have the least tend- 



ency to cause further harm to 
an already damaged area in the 
stomach or intestines. 
ROUGH foods or 'roughage', as 
they are also called, stimulate a 
sluggish digestive tract but as can 
be readily inferred they likewise 
irritate any sensitive membrane. 
STRONGLY-FLAVORED foods 
have a distinctively pungent odor 
or taste. Among such are cab- 
bage, turnips, sauerkraut, onions 
and spices. These are gas-form- 
ing which aggravate any disturb- 
ance in the digestive system with 
attendant belching and flatulence. 
FATTY foods are just that. The 
percentage of fat content is quite 
high in rich sauces, prepared 
meats and even pastries. 
HIGH CARBOHYDRATE is any 
food that contains a lot of starch 
or sugar. It is comparatively 
easy for one to detect a high 
sugar content in a certain food. 
But it is an entirely different 
matter when it comes to starch 
foods. One can indulge quite un- 
wittingly in starch foods with- 
out knowing it. For instance, 
a dieter will shy away from pota- 
toes yet go for lima beans or a 
thickened gravy in a big way. 
Another, who knows that bread is 
out, will think nothing of con- 
suming a number of crackers and 
cookies. 

FRIED foods of every descrip- 
tion are completely on the black 
list in regard to the corrective 



172 



diets under consideration here. 
They are a constant irritant to 
any disorder of the digestive 
tract. For the convenience of those 



interested in corrective diets, 
there in inserted here a detailed 
list of the more common foods 
found under the above heading. 



BLAND 


ROUGH 


STRONG 


HI-CARBO- 


i FATTY 


Milk 


Nuts 


Cabbage 


Pastry 


Butter 


Eggs 


Berries 


Brussels 


Crackers 


Olive Oil 


Custard 


Figs 


Sprouts 


Bread 


All Pork 


Jello 


Tomatoes 


Turnips 


Cereals 


Stews 


Cereals 


Bran 


Cauliflower 


Puddings 


Prepared 


Ice Cream 


Whole 


Broccoli 


Sweet 


Meats 


Milk Soups 


Wheat 


Rutabagas 


Desserts 


Gravies 


Toast 


Bread 


Sauerkraut 


Dried 


Cream 


Plain Cake 


Rye Bread 


Kale 


Fruits 


Pastry 


Cookies 


Raisins 


Onions 


Candy 


Pies 


Crackers 


Prunes 


Garlic 


Cookies 


Rich Desserts 


Lamb 


Pineapple 


Mackerel 


Rice 


Ice Cream 


Beef 


Celery 


Sardines 


Macaroni 


Cheese 


Poultry 


Kidney 


Shrimp 


Noodles 


All Fried 


Spinach 


Beans 


Asparagus 


Thickened 


Foods 


Carrots 


Lima Beans 


Corned 


Soups 




Beets 


Peas 


Beef 


Dried 




Lettuce 


Corn 


Spices 


Beans 




Wax Beans 


Shrimp 


Condiments 


Potatoes 




Peas 


Lobster 


Ripened 


Peas 




Cream 




Cheese 


Lima Beans 




Cheese 






Corn 




Green Beans 


> 








* All other fruits and vegetables are Medium or Low Carbohydrate 


foods. 











THE CORRECTIVE DIETS. 

In a broad sense, the term diet 
means merely to eat ; in the more 
restricted sense it denotes a spe- 
cialized manner of eating. So, a 
diet restricts a person to certain 
specific foods. Viewing diets in this 



light goes a long way towards elim- 
inating the one great difficulty that 
presents itself, namely, that prepar- 
ation of diets demands considerable 
technical knowledge in the science 
of nutrition. Such technical knowl- 
(Continued on page 243) 



173 



fytaJkmq, <4 HUMILITY 



He*. 4*. Matthew, 6. P. 



«* "I would wish that for prepara- 
|_ tion for prayer, after the act 
of faith in the presence of God, 
you hold it for certain that you are 
a pestilential dungheap, a creature 
all rotten, a seething mass of worms 
and then say : " 'Oh my soul, how 
repulsive you are before God/ " 
(1,198) 

How strange these words sound, 
coming from that man of practical 
affairs, the eminent missionary, the 
prudent director, St. Paul of the 
Cross. These words seem to show 
such sentimentality, such repuls- 
ive exaggeration that we wonder 
how they could have come from the 
pen of a man of the splendid judg- 
ment and sense of balance as our 
Holy Founder. Yet it was only by 
such strong figurative language that 
he was able to express the condition 
of his own soul as he saw it in 
the terribly resplendent light of 
God's holines. 

Our Holy Founder realized deep- 
ly the ALL that was God and the 
utter gratuity of God's gifts, and 
by contrast, the nothingness and 
weakness of man and the mon- 
strosity of sin. And he expressed 

174 



this realization in a way such as 
is found in the writings of few of 
the saints. In fact it is hard to 
see how anyone could have empha- 
sized the need of this insight more 
than he. This emphasis on humility 
is a signal characteristic of Paul- 
icrucian spirituality. 

His starting point is the realiza- 
tion of the nothingness of the soul 
before the ALL. "He who wishes 
to find the true all, which is God, 
must cast himself in nothingness. 
God is He who is by essence; He 
is who is: Ego sum qui sum. We 
are that which is not, because how- 
soever deep we dig, we will find 
naught but nothingness, nothing- 
ness. And he who has sinned is 
worse than this nothing, because 
sin is a horrible nothing, worse 
than nothing." So he wrote to 
Sister Mary Cherubina, (Aug. 9, 
1740). 

"Remain in your nothingness and 
you will find that in yourself there 
is only pure nothingness ;" "remain 
always more in your nothingness ;" 
"annihilate yourself before God;" 
— these are the exhortations we find 
time and time again in his letters. 



The idea of falling from nothing- 
ness into the worse nothingness of 
sin is frequently expressed. He told 
Agnes Grazi that after temptation, 
especially the more severe ones, ". . . 
the soul should always, besides giv- 
ing thanks to God, annihilate it- 
self the more before God, recog- 
nizing that the victory is due purely 
to God, holding it for certain, as 
infallibly true, that being a pure 
nothing the only thing that it could 
do of itself would be to fall from 
its nothingness into the still greater 
nothingness of sin. To God alone 
belongs the honor, by giving Him 
the sweet incense of all His gifts. 
Oh! if one understood this truth 
thoroughly, how he would fear 
himself ; how he would empty him- 
self/' (1,238) 

Just as we are not to take any 
credit ourselves for overcoming 
temptation, so we are not to take 
credit ourselves for any gifts God 
gives us, whether of nature or 
grace. In fact, we should realize 
that God's gifts are usually impared 
by the shabbiness of our coopera- 
tion. "Do not reflect upon nor ever 
regard them (gifts of prayer) as 
contributing any beauty to you, but 
consider them as having been placed 
in a stinking dunghill by the divine 
Goodness," he tells Sister Columba 
(11,522). Again we read in another 
letter: "God deposits His treas- 
ures in that nauseous swamp, which 
is yourself. Do you restore them 
whence they came, to be purified." 



Frequently St. Paul would sum 
up all these various aspects of our 
spiritual poverty in one. Thus he 
exhorts Fr. John Mary, C.P., "Let 
us remain in our nothingness, in 
the fact that we have nothing, can 
do nothing, understand nothing, 
etc., and then God will draw out 
of this nothing a great work for 
His greater glory." (111,149) He 
tells Sister Columba, "I recommend 
to you to make more and more fre- 
quent visits to your nothingness, 
your having nothing, your inability 
to do anything, . . ." 

He frequently tells souls that 
when they are at prayer they should 
stand in their own nothingness, giv- 
ing to God the honor and glory of 
all His gifts. He tells Fr. Thomas, 
C.P. : "Learn how to give to God 
that which is His and to keep for 
yourself that which is ours, that is, 
our true nothingness, for this is 
the true science of the saints." 
(1,558). To Lucy Burlini he writes 
(11,721): "Listen, Lucy : you must 
be just to each side ; keep for your- 
self that which is your own, name- 
ly your horrible nothingness, which 
is capable of bringing forth every 
sort of evil possible; then leave 
to God that which is His, for every- 
thing good is from Him." To still 
another he writes, "Humble your- 
self more and more, remain always 
in true poverty of spirit. Strip 
yourself, as I said, of all His gifts 
since they are soiled with your 
dust, and make of them a sacrifice 



175 



of praise, honor and benediction 
to the Most High, keeping yourself 
in your nakedness." He called this 
"separating the vile from the 
precious." 

He frequently warned souls 
not to take complaceny in the vir- 
tues or the gifts God gave them, 
". . . . for this would be to become a 
thief by robbing God of His treas- 
ures." Rather the soul ". . . abased 
in its horrible nothingness, should 
incense the Most High with these 
gifts and graces, returning them to 
that abyss of charity whence they 
came." (IV, 96, 97; 11,461; etc. 

The more souls advanced in the 
ways of prayer the stronger be- 
came his insistence upon humility. 
He considered humility as the sur- 
est safeguard against deception. 
"He who is humble will not be de- 
ceived," he assured Agnes Grazi 
time and again. "The way to flee 
deception is to humble oneself as 
much as possible and not to trust 
in oneself," he told Thomas Fossi, 
(later Fr. Thomas, C.P.) 

Humility, he considered to be the 
best preparation for receiving fur- 
ther graces from God. "We should 
keep ourselves in our horrible and 
monstruous nothingness," he tells 
a certain nun. "When God grants 
you the grace of showing you your 
deformity and misery, cultivate this 
view, as it alone can prepare you 
to receive greater graces and make 
you avoid every illusion." (IV,338) 

"I would that this should be your 



preparation for receiving greater 
gifts from God: an annihilation 
of yourself ever more profound, a 
disgust of your own vileness and 
nastiness ; frequent glances at your 
past ingratitude in order to humble 
yourself the more before God and 
the more to know your own vile- 
ness. Then after that let your soul 
fly to God, let it become inflamed, 
melted, ..." he writes to Agnes 
Grazi. (1,230) 

He told Sister Columba, (11,494) : 
"If I were your director I would 
command you always to take as the 
first point of your prayer the con- 
sideration of your sins and your 
great exceeding misery. And I 
would have you probe this point 
deeply/' 

To Agnes Grazi, after urging her 
on to a very lofty practice of the 
love of God, he says, (1,315) : 
"Humble yourself, annihilate your- 
self, despise yourself, desire to be 
adhorred by everyone as a useless 
servant; make yourself very small, 
despoil yourself of all that is not 
God and seek Him alone. Above all 
know that everything is a loving 
gift of god and that you have of 
yourself nothing but rottenness, pus 
and every evil." 

Our Holy Founder knew how to 
lead souls on to a great love for 
God. "Clothe yourself in the Pas- 
sion of Christ;" "offer yourself 
as a victim to be consumed on the 
altar of the Sacred Heart;" enter I 
through the wounds of Christ into 



176 



the bosom of the Trinity;" "cast 
yourself into the abyss of the In- 
finite Good and let yourself be en- 
tirely lost in Him:" these are the 
frequent exhortations of St. Paul, 
which he often develops quite at 
length. But nearly always he would 
add, "If you are humble, God will 
teach you these things." Or, "This 
science, God teaches only to the 
humble." "Abase yourself in your 
horrible nothingness, then God will 
make you understand." These or 
similar quotations could be multi- 
plied a score of times. 

This self-knowledge was not to 
lead to discouragement. Rather it 
should be the very source of con- 
fidence ; the means of access to God. 
He tells Sister Columba, (11,457), 
"Your fear of losing God, resulting 
from the knowledge which God has 
granted you of your nothingness, 
is excellent, provided that it neither 
worries you nor robs you of peace. 
Now pay attention to me: act in 
this wise: gratefully accept the 
knowledge God gives you of your 
nothingness and malice, but like a 
frightened child take flight immedi- 
ately and hide in the abyss of the 
Divinity. Rest there without any 
disturbing fear. The fear of God 
which is a gift of the Holy Spirit 
does not harass the soul ; on the 
contrary it brings greater peace 
and whilst revealing to the soul its 
own misery and natural tendency 
to every possible evil, makes it hide 
always deeper in God and run more 



quickly to the bosom of the Heaven- 
ly Father, there to repose." 

This practice of casting our noth- 
ingness and imperfection in the 
ALL which is God is one that he 
frequently recommends. To Lucy 
Burlini he writes, (11,724), "Hum- 
bled and concentrated in your noth- 
ingness, powerlessness, indigence 
and ignorance, yet filled with deep 
filial confidence in our Lord, lose 
yourself completely in the ocean of 
the charity of God, Who is a fire 
of love. In this furnace let every- 
thing imperfect in you be con- 
sumed." To Sister Cherubina he 
writes, (1,448) : "I would like you 
to exercise yourself a great deal 
in perfect knowledge of your noth- 
ingness, following this by precipi- 
tating that nothing which is yours 
into that immense ALL which is 
our good God." And to Agnes Grazi 
he writes, (1,216), "Remain always 
in complete contempt of self, de- 
siring that creatures should con- 
sider you as they are accustomed 
to consider a fetid sewer of filth, 
in the neighborhood of which all 
are accustomed to hold their nos- 
trils so as not to smell the stench 
and with these sentiments cast 
yourself into that abyss of every 
good that He may transform your 
soul . . . ."' 

Later he tells her the depth of 
humility she must attain to before 
she will be ready to be united eter- 
nally with God. "I rejoice," he says, 
"that the walls of your prison are 



177 



wearing thin, (referring to her in- 
creasing illness). But you must 
note that to leave the prison of 
your body you must be clothed in 
garments of ashen color on which 
are inscribed the words : 'I am a 
pure nothing. I am an abyss of 
evil. You alone, My God, art that 
which is and from You I hope for 
every good, through the merits of 
the Blood of Jesus.' " (1,239) 

Thus for St. Paul of the Cross 
the starting point of real interior 
union with God is humility: the 
realization of our nothingness, our 
selfishness, vanity, inconstancy, and 
inclination to sensuality, impurity 
and every evil. This realization and 
acknowledgement of our sinfulness 
and weakness will draw down God's 
gifts, protect them and open the 
way for still greater graces. It 
will save us from all illusion. The 
deeper this realization of our true 



state of soul and the more it is 
acknowledged before God the more 
richly will it win God's graces. This 
knowledge, far from leading to dis- 
couragement or melancholy, is a 
source of deep peace and trust in 
God. If at times St. Paul's figur- 
ative language seems to us exag- 
gerated, it is only because of our 
blindness and lack of insight. 

In thus emphasizing humility, St. 
Paul of the Cross is but echoing the 
common teaching of the saints. 
They call humility the "locus grati- 
ae," — the place where one goes to 
get grace. St. Thomas says that 
"humility is the disposition which 
gives the soul easy access to spir- 
itual and divine goods." 

Here then is a fundamental dis- 
position that must be ours if we are 
to acquire those virtues and that 
Passionist perfection which St. 
Paul of the Cross looks for from us. 



(Continued from page 161) 
jects, to our own judgment, even 
that of imprisonment and suspen- 
sion from office, if necessary. 

Given in this Retreat of San 
Angelo, in the act of the Provincial 



Chapter, this 18th day of October 
1766. 

General 



178 



Fr. Louis 

of 

St. John the Evangelist 
C.P. 

OBITUARY OF FR. 

LOUIS HOCHENDONER, C.P., 

DEAN OF THE 

CONGREGATION 



AT TEN minutes past midnight, 
Friday Dec. 29, 1950, in the 
city of Buenos Aries, the oldest 
member of the Passionist Congre- 
gation passed peacefully from this 
earth to God. Praying at his bed- 
side were his brothers in Christ. 
It was the end of a long life spent 
in God's service. Like Holy Job, 
God permitted Fr. Louis, in his 
last years, to be afflicted with many 
infirmities, chief among which was 
his blindness. This made him al- 
most completely dependent on his 
fellow religious. However, he re- 
mained, throughout his affliction, 
a model of patience and showed 
himself to be a real man of God 
by his constant prayer and resigna- 
tion to the Divine Will. No one 




Fr. Louis Hochendoner,CP. 

entered Fr. Louis' cell without com- 
ing away edified and his soul a 
little nearer to God. No matter 
at what hour, there was the grand 
old priest with his rosary in his 
hands and lips moving in prayer. 
Small wonder then that the Reli- 
gious carried their dead brother 
with heavy hearts into the sacred 
edifice, Holy Cross Church, which 
he himself had helped to build. 

Throughout Saturday, December 
30th, people filed past his coffin as 
it lay in the Church to breathe a 
prayer for the repose of his soul. 
Many there were who touched a 



179 



rosary to his sacredotal hands. 
That same evening the religious 
gathered in the Church to recite 
the Rosary and chant the Office of 
the Dead. Sunday morning, the 
Solemn Requiem Mass was sung 
by Very Rev. Fr. Stephen, First 
Consultor. Rev. Fr. Louis Dolan, 
C.P., preached the sermon — an elo- 
quent discourse. Shortly after- 
wards the funeral cortege left for 
the Passionist Cemetery at St. 
Paul's, near Capitan Sarmiento, 
where the final obsequies were held 
by Very Rev. Fr. Ildephonsus 
Lynch, C.P., the Rector. And thus, 
Fr. Louis, the dean of the Congre- 
gation, found his final resting place 
far away from his native land, in 
the land of his adoption — the Pam- 
pas of Argentina. 

Rev. Fr. Louis was of German 
extraction, born in Clarion, Penn- 
sylvania, August 7, 1856. He was 
ordained by the Vicar General of 
Pope Leo XIII, Cardinal Rafaele 
Monaco La Valetta on March 13, 
1880. He left the Eternal City 
shortly after for the United States, 
and three years later he came to 
help pioneer the Passionist Founda- 
tion in Argentina, with the late Fr. 
Fidelis Kent Stone. It was due in 
no small measure to his dynamic 
energy that Holy Cross Monastery 
and Church were built, the former 
in 1886, the latter in 1890. He spent 
over 50 years of active missionary 
work in Argentina, Chile and Uru- 
guay. In both the latter countries 



he founded Monasteries. 

He was a powerful and effective 
preacher and possessed extraordi- 
nary qualities as a missionary. Per- 
haps one of his more noteworthy 
achievements, one that has brought 
untold blessings, was his bringing 
the Passionist Sisters to Buenos 
Aires. They came willingly upon 
his invitation, even though the pros- 
pects were far from bright. 
Through the generous hospitality 
of Mrs. Michael Ham they were able 
to found what is now the outstand- 
ing college for girls in Argentina, 
the "Michael Ham Memorial Col- 
lege." 

Fr. Louis clung to his priestly 
activity as long as it was physical- 
ly possible. As late as six months 
before his death he would show up 
occasionally in the choir for Matins, 
indicating when they were over 
that he would like to say Mass or 
receive Holy Communion. At ninety 
years of age, it was not unusual 
for him to play the organ for solemn 
matins. It was with pride he re- 
counted his days as organist at 
Sts. John and Paul. Up to his 
eighty-eighth year, he was always 
at his penitents' beck and call, for 
confession in the church. Many im- 
portant ecclesiastical and lay per- 
sons chose him as their spiritual 
father. The ecclesiastics would 
walk right up to his little cell. He 
heard confessions in German, Itali- 
an, English and Spanish; his facil- 
ity of tongue accounted for his 



180 



greatly varied clientele. He was 
a personal and intimate friend of 
the Cardinal, who visited him at the 
Monastery from time to time. Dur- 
ing his last days, His Eminence 
Msgr. Santiago L. Copello, Cardinal 
Archbishop and Primate of Argen- 
tina, came to visit him in his cell. 
In his active days, Fr. Louis en- 
deared himself to all, both poor and 
rich. He gained the affection of 
their hearts, and consequently had 
access to their homes. The dwell- 
ings of the poor and the palaces 
of the rich were alike open to him. 
In Holy Cross Church there are 
chalices, ciboria, monstrances — 
gifts to the Passionist Fathers 
through the instrumentality of the 
old priest. 

His energy in conducting mis- 
sions throughout Argentina was 
astonishing. He had a method all 
his own for gaining the sympathy 
and confidence of the "gauches" 
— the Argentina cowboys. Quite 
often he was known to break down 
the barriers of reticence with a 
good cigar. He rose early while on 
the Missions, usually around 4 a.m., 
a reminder to his companions of 
his earnestness and sincerity. 

As Rector of Holy Cross, he was 
a great lover of the poor, and once 
a year he would gather the really 
poor of the district and sit them 
down to a princely feast. While 
very strict with himself, he was 
lavishly generous with others. He 
would often lament the cost of 



medicine for himself, even though 
it was negligible and indispensable. 
Typical of his poverty was his re- 
fusal to have a hearing aid, remark- 
ing that the Congregation had al- 
ready spent enough on him. God 
alone knows how much he suffered 
from his combined infirmities — 
blindness, deafness and hernia. 
Nevertheless, he never claimed any 
particular privilege. He always 
tried to conform in every detail to 
the common life of a Passionist. He 
held the traditions and customs of 
the Congregation in great esteem 
and considered them as the strong- 
est barriers protecting the purity 
of the Holy Rule. 

Although first and foremost, al- 
ways a missionary, he held, at vari- 
ous times, posts of responsibility, 
such as Rector, Consultor and Mas- 
ter of Novices. In 1940, on. the oc- 
casion of the 60th anniversary of 
his Ordination, he received the title 
"Apostolic Missionary," and was 
awarded the highest papal decora- 
tion "Pro Ecclesia et Pontifice." 
August 7th, 1946, on the completion 
of his 90th year, President Juan 
Peron, in the name of the Argentine 
Government, awarded him a gold 
medal in gratitude for his services 
to the country. 

Those who knew him, know that 
there was a much greater award 
awaiting him in Heaven, for the 
unselfish services rendered to God's 
little ones upon earth. In your char- 
ity say a prayer for his soul. R. I. P. 



181 



Our Superiors 



lus Particulate C.P. 



THE LOCAL CHAPTER 



DESIGNATION 



312. The local 



Chapter represents 
the religious family and treats of 
its business. In the Bull Supremi 
Apostolatus, Sect. 5, this Chapter 
is called the particular Chapter. 

The local Chapter is two-fold: 
ordinary and extraordinary. The 
first is held each Friday for the 
confession of faults, whence in law 
it is also called the Chapter of 
faults. The other is enjoined for 
certain occasions designated in the 
Constitutions, namely for the ac- 
ceptance of novices to Vestition and 
profession; 1 for promoting clerics 
to sacred orders; 2 for extraordi- 
nary expenses and other business 
regarding the financial administra- 
tion, 3 and for imposing a penance 
on delinquents. 4 

313. For the local 

CONVENED Cha P ter > a convoca- 
tion properly so-called 
is not necessary. It is sufficient that 
the religious, who have a right to 
be present, be in some way made 
aware that the Chapter is to be 
held, or de facto be gathered to- 
gether, although for some other 
reason. If there is a convocation, 
it is evident that it ought to be 
made by the Rector of the Retreat, 




or by another in his name and au- 
thority. 

314. By right the 
^PRVvlnJ Rector presides over 
the local Chapter, and 
in his absence, the Vicar, even 
though one of the Consultors is 
present. If the Provincial or the 
General is present in the Retreat, 
it is his right to preside at the lo- 
cal Chapter. 5 

315. According to the 

PRESENT J™ * Ule , ^r 

13), not only the Su- 
perior, but also all the Lay Brothers 
of the Congregation" were to be 
called to the local Chapter. In the 
1746 Rule (Chapter 13) the lay 
Brothers were excluded from the 
chapter, as well as clerics not yet 
in sacred orders. The local Chap- 
ter was to consist "of the Priests 
and other brethren in sacred or- 
ders, always excluding the lay 
brothers and other professed re- 
ligious who lack the right of suf- 
frage." Therefore, according to the 
text of the Rules, which remained 
unchanged until the latest revision 
in 1930, the Students in sacred 
orders also took part in the local 
chapter, from the time of their re- 



182 



ception of subdiaconate. However, 
this right of the Students was 
limited for divers reasons. The first 
limitation was in regard to the 
Friday Chapter. In the 1746 and 
1769 Rules, Chapter 34, we read: 
"Then the senior brethren treat of 
the more important business of the 
Congregation." In the same Rules, 
and also in the text of 1775, to- 
wards the end of the same chapter, 
it is said that the Chapter should 
use more opportune and suitable 
remedies against transgressors, 
having heard the counsel of the pre- 
siding superior and the senior fa- 
thers." 

After diligent consideration of 
these words, the 15th General Chap- 
ter, Session 56, published the fol- 
lowing decree : "All the Students 
shall say culpa together in Friday 
Chapter, even though they be or- 
dained, and then they shall leave the 
Choir until culpa has been said by 
the professed priests. Upon its 
completion, at the signal of the 
Superior, the ordained Students, 
and those in sacred orders, only, 
shall enter to take part in any 
business to be treated." Thus, al- 
though according to the Rule 
(Chapter 11) the Students in sac- 
red orders were members of the 
local chapter, they were admitted 
only partially in the Friday Chap- 
ter, for, as the Regulations men- 
tion, "The Rule reserves some 
things to the senior fathers." 

Another limitation regarded the 
Chapter for elections. When, by 



instruction of the Sacred Congre- 
gation of Religious (July 30, 1909), 
it became necessary to elect coun- 
sellors in each Retreat, the local 
•Chapter also had the duty of se- 
ecting these officials within three 
months after the Provincial Chap- 
ter. 7 At first, in accordance with 
the Rule, the Students in sacred or- 
ders took part in the elections. 
However, the Most Eminent Cardi- 
nal Prefect of the Sacred Congrega- 
tion of Religious, in a letter of Ap- 
ril 27, 1914, to the General of the 
Congregation, declared that the stu- 
dents, even though priests, had not 
active voice in the Chapters which 
were called to elect counsellors. 

Finally, a third limitation of the 
right of the Students came from 
the 31st General Chapter, which, in 
its 2nd decree, stated that the 
young students, even though in sac- 
red orders have no part in the local 
chapter when there is question of 
admitting religious to the renewal 
of vows or to sacred ordination. 

Considering all these things ma- 
turely, when experience proved that 
the same reasons were present when 
there was question of expenses and 
other matter regarding the finan- 
cial administration, and when, upon 
the suppression of counsellors by 
the 32nd General Chapter, 8 the 
office of council necessary fell back 
to the local Chapter, it was seen 
opportune to the General Curia that 
in the Rules, as conformed to the 
Code, there be added a clause that 
Students, even though in sacred 



183 



orders, be entirely excluded from 
the local chapter. Therefore the 
text of Chapter 11, in regard to the 
constitution of the local chapter, 
after taking the vote of each Pro- 
vincial Curia, was changed in the 
following manner: "of the entire 
local chapter (which shall perform 
the function of a council also) con- 
sisting of the Priests in perpetual 
vows, always excluding the Stu- 
dents, even though in sacred orders, 
and also the lay brothers, who have 
no right of suffrage." 9 

Notice that the phrase "in sac- 
red orders" comprehends not only 
deacons and subdeacons, but also 
student priests. In law the phrase 
includes the priesthood, the diacon- 
ate and the subdiaconate. 10 There- 
fore the words of the Rule, Chapter 
32, no. 284 : "Then, the Clerics and 
lay brothers being excluded, the 
priests shall treat . . . etc." is to be 
understood in the light of the above- 
mentioned reformed text. Namely, 
the word "clerics" comprehends all 
the students, whether they have re- 
ceived sacred orders or not. The 
word "priests" means the Fathers 
who have already completed the 
curriculum of studies and are num- 
bered among the so-called pro- 
fessed Fathers. 

Likewise, it is to be noted in the 
new text that, in accord with Canon 
578, perpetual profession is re- 
quired in order that anyone have 
an active voice in the local chapter. 
Therefore a priest who has only 
temporary vows is to be excluded 



from the chapter. 

316. The question 

R^UGIOUS arises wne ther priests 
who live for only a 
short time in the Retreat have an 
active voice in the chapter. The an- 
swer is in the negative. For, 
"priests who are only passing 
through the Retreat, have no part 
in the local chapter." 11 The reason 
is because the local chapter repre- 
sents the religious family. However 
the family is composed of those 
only who constitute a canonical 
house under the jurisdiction of the 
Rector, and not those who dwell 
there by chance or but briefly. In 
regard to the Consultors, see num- 
ber 190, 11. 

317. It is certain 

DE L FAMIUA that " the l0Cal cha P" 
ters are valid and 

lawful, even though some of the 
priests de familia, remaining away 
from the retreat of their own ac- 
cord or beyond the limits of their 
permission, are not present, whe- 
ther they have been notified or 
not." 12 

The same is to be said when 
priests are away with the legiti- 
mate permission of the Superior. 
For "the accidental absence of some 
priest de familia does not hinder 
the validity of the chapter. How- 
ever, when there is question of 
some matter of importance, the 
Superior must take care, unless 
there is danger in delay, that the 
Chapter should be called at a time 
when most of the priests are at 



184 



home, and not impeded by other 
duties from being present." 18 

Neither does it matter if some, 
even though called, refuse to be 
present at the chapter, for then it 
is presumed that they renounce 
their vote. However, it is upon 
their conscience if any damage 
comes from their abstention. 11 

Notice that if anyone feels dis- 
criminated against by being passed 
over or absent, he may propose an 
exception. However, when there is 
a question of business, there is no 
obligation on the Rector to nulli- 
fy the decision of the chapter. 



CONFIRMATION 



318. According 



to the 1st Gen- 
eral Chapter, it seems that the local 
Chapter had to be confirmed by the 
General, at least when there was 
question of constructing build- 
ings. 15 Today, according to the 
Rule, confirmation by the Provin- 
cial or the General is not necessary, 
unless there is question of matters 
which, beside the consent of the 
chapter, also require the consent of 
the given Superior. 10 

319. Can the Provin- 

CONSFNT cia ^ su PPly the consent 
of the Chapter? If the 
consent of the local chapter is de- 
manded in a given matter, the Su- 
perior, even the Provincial, acts in- 
validly against the vote of the 
Chapter, as the Rule expressly de- 



clares, in paragraph 101. Where- 
fore the Provincial, whether alone 
or with his consultors, even at the 
time of Visitation, can not supply 
the consent of the chapter. How- 
ever, he has the faculty of propos- 
ing the matter to the General who, 
having heard his consultors, can 
change or rescind the vote of the lo- 
cal Chapter, unless in a case of 
admission to the novitiate or to 
first profession, as the Rule notes. 17 

320. Canon 1361, 



ORDINARY 
CONFESSORS 



section 3, pre- 
scribes, in regard 
to the ordinary confessors of semi- 
narians, "when there is question of 
admission to orders or expelling 
from the Seminary, the vote of 
confessors should never be re- 
quired." Some, not without reason, 
have extended this prescription, 
which is founded on Canon 890, to 
the confessors of our Novices, and 
Students, when there is question of 
their admission to profession or to 
Sacred Orders, for the same reason 
holds. Nevertheless, since there is 
no express prohibition in the Code 
for such confessors, and since it is 
a question of limiting the exercise 
of a right, 18 I might say that it is 
by no means certain that the pre- 
scription of Canon 1361 necessarily 
extends to them. Thus, the matter 
is left to the prudence and con- 
science of the confessors them- 
selves 



i Rfffttlo, mi. 84, Ti'. 7::. 76. 2 Statuta, n. 64. I lunula, n. 101. 4 Ibid., n. 307. sSi/llogc, 

n. 86. 8 Regclamenti 1921, n. til. I I". Atoyahu, »,,. ,-it.. pp. 24-26. B Of r. n. 341. o RcgtUa, 

n. 76. 10 Can. 949. u SyUoge, n. ".<;. L2 Collection faouit., n. 48. ltSyMog*, n. 39. 14 Syl- 

loyc, n. 39. I5t'u,i. (,'in. I. is. u\ h'iuiilu, n. 102. \i lit aula, n. 101. is Can. 19. 

185 



THE WAY OF 



$* 



mm LOVE 



A REVIEW AND A 
FEW EXCERPTS 
FROM THE PAGES 
OF A BOOK THAT 
HAS QUICKLY BECOME 
POPULAR. 



A RECENT EDITION of Books 071 
Trial (Feb. 1951) carried the 
heading: "Books that will inspire 
and give you a deeper understand- 
ing of the mystery of the Passion 
and Death of Our Lord ..." Of 
the twenty books listed, first place 
was given to a work recently edited 
in English for the first time, "The 
Way of Divine Love," or The Mes- 
sage of the Sacred Heart to the 
World. This new edition is an am- 
plification of a smaller work of the 
same name which has been trans- 
lated from the orginal Spanish into 
French, Portugese, Italian, Chinese, 
Polish and Hungarian — thus ful- 
filling our Lord's desire that His 
appeal be heard as widely as pos- 
sible. 

The book's intrinsic worth, the 
enthusiastic reviews accorded it by 
competent critics and the fact that 
"The Way of Divine Love" has been 
a best seller since the publishing 
of the English edition — despite its 



rather steep price ($4.25) — compel 
us to communicate to others the 
knowledge of the spiritual wealth 
the book contains. 

Sister Josepha Menendez, the 
humble recipient of this "new" mes- 
sage of the Sacred Heart, has been 
called "A New Saint Margaret 
Mary" by Rev. Fr. Donovan, CM., 
J. CD., in an article in the Homi- 
letic and Pastoral Review (Sept. 
1950). The following brief bio- 
graphical note is drawn from his 
article. 

"On December 29, 1923, Sister 
Josepha Menendez, then 33 years 
of age, died as a Lay Sister in the 
Sacred Heart Convent in Poitiers, 
France. She was born in Madrid, 
and from the time of her first Com- 
munion in 1902 she aspired to the 
Religious Life. The death of her 
father in 1907 prevented that, how- 
ever; and from then until 1920 she 
supported her mother and looked 
after the younger members of the 
family. She was a skilled dress- 
maker, and thought that she would 
be able to enter religion after she 
had trained her sister to earn the 
kind of livelihood at which she was 
adept. But her sister thoughtlessly 
entered the Sisters of the Sacred 
Heart in Madrid, and thus kept the 
elder sister from carrying out her 
ambition until 1920. 



186 



"She left Madrid on Feb. 4, 1920 
to become a Lay Sister in the Soci- 
ety of the Sacred Heart of Jesus. 
In less than four short years she 
had gone through a perfect prepara- 
tion for becoming a victim of souls. 
She underwent every form of natu- 
ral and preternatural mortification 
to cleanse her soul of any and all 
forms of self-seeking. Few of the 
canonized saints had the experi- 
ences that she had almost from the 
beginning of her religious life, and 
which ended only a few days be- 
fore her death, December 29, 1923. 
. . . Let us remark, at this point, 
that almost from the beginning of 
these divine visitations of the part 
of the Saviour, or Our Lady, Jose- 
pha was told to mention these mes- 
sages to either the Assistant Su- 
perioress or the Superioress. The 
latter in now the Mother General 
of the Society of the Sacred Heart 
of Jesus. . . . 

"As early as 1926, after making 
a careful examination, of the writ- 
ings of Sister Josepha, a Consultor 
of the Sacred Congregation of 
Rites thus ended his report : "I 
pray God that these things may 
become known for the Glory of God, 
and to strengthen the faith of 
diffident and timid souls, and also 
that the holy Religious of the Sacred 
Heart who wrote them may be glori- 
fied." 

Incidentally, there is a close, if 
not widely recognized, connection 
between our own spirit and that of 



the Religious of the Sacred Heart 
of Jesus. St. Madeleine Sophie 
Barat, the Foundress of the Reli- 
gious of the Sacred Heart, to whom 
the Sacred Heart has entrusted this 
latest revelation of His love, once 
made this significant comment about 
her Society and the Passionists 
whom she greatly esteemed : "We 
are devoted to the Sufferings of the 
Heart of Jesus." 

Since whatever relates to the Pas- 
sion of Christ is of interest to us, 
it will not be out of place here to 
give a few selections from the book. 
The following is drawn from Chap- 
ter VIII, where the Sacred Heart 
reveals to Sister Josepha the events 
of his Sacred Passion, and the senti- 
ments of His Suffering Heart. It 
is Saturday, March 17th, during 
the Lent of 1923. 

"A few hours later (Josepha) was 
at her post of waiting, till it pleased 
Him to lead her still further into 
His Sorrowful Passion: 'Contem- 
plate me in the prison where I 
spend the greater part of the night. 
The soldiers came and, adding in- 
sult to injuries, mocked me, out- 
raged me and gave me blows on my 
face and on my whole body. 

'Tired of their sport, at length 
they left me bound and alone in 
the dark and noisome place, where, 
seated on a stone, my aching body 
was cramped with the cold. 

'Compare the prison with the 
Tabernacle . . . and especially with 
the hearts that receive me. 



187 



'In the prison I spent only part 
of one night . . . but in the Taber- 
nacle, how many days and nights? 

'In the prison I was insulted and 
ill-treated by soldiers who were my 
enemies. In the tabernacle most 
often it is they who call me their 
Father who treat me thus, but how 
unlike that of children is the treat- 
ment 

'In the prison I endured cold, 
sleeplessness, hunger and thirst, 
pain, shame, solitude and desertion. 
And there passed before my mind's 
eye all the tabernacles where in the 
course of ages I should lack the 
shelter of love — the icy-cold hearts 
that would be as hard and unfeeling 
as the stones of the prison floor 
were to my numbed and wounded 
body. 

'How often should I hunger for 
souls . . . for their fidelity . . . for 
their generosity . . . would they sat- 
isfy that eager hunger by a little 
victory over self or by a slight 
mortification? Would they conform 
me in my sorrow by their tender- 
ness and compassion ? In some hard 
moment would they endure the pain 
. . . neglect . . . scorn . . . opposition 
grief of soul or family . . . would 
they come to me and say: 'This I 
offer Thee to console Thy sadness, 
to keep Thee company in Thy soli- 
tude/ Oh, if they would thus unite 
themselves to Me, with what peace 
would they face difficulties . . . how 
much fortitude they would win and 
how they would gladden my Heart ! 



'In the prison what shame I felt 
at the obscene words of those a- 
round Me . . . and my distress was 
increased by the thought that like 
words would one day fall from the 
lips I love. 

'When blows and buffets were 
rained upon me by the filthy hands 
of the soldiery it recalled to my 
mind how often those who were 
to receive me into their hearts, 
fouled by unrepentant sin, would 
shower reiterated blows on me by 
habitual deliberate sin. 

'And in the prison when they 
pushed me and let me fall to the 
ground bound and helpless, so many 
were present to my mind who would 
prefer a moment's satisfaction to 
me, who would lead me with chains 
by their ingratitude, would push 
me back again and cause meyto fall 
by leaving me alone. 

'Oh, you who are consecrated to 
Me, draw near the Bridegroom of 
your souls in His prison. Gaze stead- 
fastly upon him during that night 
of pain and see that sorrow con- 
tinued in the loneliness of countless 
tabernacles and the coldness of 
many hearts. 

'If you are desirous of proving 
your sympathy, open your hearts 
and let me find a prison therein . . . 

'There bind me with chains of 
love . . . there clothe me with loving 
attentions . . . Appease my hunger 
by your generosity . . . Assuage my 
thirst by your zeal . . . Comfort me 
in my sorrow by keeping me faith- 



188 



ful company and by wiping away 
my shame by your purity and up- 
rightness of intention. 

'If you wish Me to take my rest 
in you, prepare for my coming by 
acts of self-denial . . . master your 
imagination and calm the tumult 
of your passions . . . then in the still- 
ness of your soul I shall sleep in 
peace, and you will hear my voice 
speaking gently within you : Oh 
bride of my Heart! Today you are 
my repose, but for all eternity I 
shall be your rest. . . Tenderly and 
with love you have harbored me in 
the prison of your heart. I shall 
be your reward exceeding great and 
you will never regret any sacrifice 
you have made for me during your 
life!'" 

Whoever has read "The Way of 



Divine Love" has been a better 
priest, a more faithful religious, 
and more devoted follower of the 
Sacred Heart and His Sacred Pas- 
sion. Few books have the appeal 
of this "spiritual classic of our gen- 
eration," as it has been called, and 
few so quickly reward the reader. 
'Taste and see that the Lord is 
sweet." Those who have read it 
will vouch for the fulfillment of the 
wish of our Holy Father, then Car- 
dinal Pacelli, when he wrote in the 
foreword to the French Edition, in 
1938 : "May the publication of these 
pages efficaciously contribute to de- 
velop in many souls a confidence 
ever more complete and loving in 
the Infinite Mercy of this Divine 
Heart toward poor sinners such as 
we all are." 

Fr. Caspar, C.P. 




OUR COVER 

Our Cover Picture shows Most Reverend Bishop Fulton J. Sheen, D.D., at 
the front door of Ss. John and Paul, shortly after the ceremony of his conse- 
cration as Auxiliary Bishop of New York. At his left is Cardinal Fumasoni 
Biondi, and at the Cardinal's left is His Excellency, Martin J. O'Connor, Rector 
of the North American College at Rome. Most Rev. Fr. General, Albert of the 
Sorrowful Virgin, C.P., may be seen at the new Bishop's right. 



189 



General Chapter Decrees 

AN UNOFFICIAL TRANSLATION OF 

THE RECENT COLLECTION EDITED 

BY THE GENERAL CURIA 



34th GENERAL CHAPTER 



1. To each Provincial Curia is 
given the faculty, in particular 
cases, of sending some of the young- 
er priests to Ecclesiastical Universi- 
ties in their own territory, in order 
that the said religious may be better 
prepared for teaching, maintaining 
however, in regard to residence, 
Can. 587, Sect. 4, and having in- 
formed the Father General at the 
beginning of the scholastic year. 

2. The General Examination, pre- 
scribed in No. 179-180 of the Rules, 
is still of obligation ; however, con- 
sidering the change of circum- 
stances and the diversity of times 
and the extent of the courses, it is 
sufficient that it embrace those 
studies that the young men have 
undergone in the course of Theol- 
ogy. 

3. Since neither the Constitutions 
nor the Regulations have anything 
definite concerning houses that are 
separate from their Provinces, 
which until now it has been the 
practice at times to erect into a 
Commissariate or Vice-Province, 
the Venerable Chapter, in order that 



this practice may rest on some 
juridical foundation, intrusts to the 
General Curia the duty of drawing 
up an apt schema of arrangements, 
in accordance with the practice of 
other Religious, to be submitted 
first to the individual Provincial 
Curias, then to the next General 
Chapter for revision, and finally to 
be presented to the Sacred Congre- 
gation of Religious for its necessary 
approbation. 

4. The Local Chapter referred to 
in No. 54 of the Regulation^ is 
to be convened only when there is 
question of promoting a cleric to 
the Order of Subdiaconate, all else, 
for Subdiaconate as well as for the 
other Orders, both Major and 
Minor, having been faithfully car- 
ried out as decreed in the Instruc- 
tion of the Sacred Congregation of 
Religious, on Dec. 1, 1931. 

5. The Venerable Chapter, de- 
clares, in reference to the 10th de- 
cree of the 29th General Chapter, 
that the obligation of applying a 
Mass for our Benefactors on the 
suppressed feasts of St. Lawrence 



190 



and the Holy Innocents no longer 
exists. 

6. The Venerable Chapter decrees 
that the words in No. 75 of the 
Regulations, concerning the use of 
milk, "Fridays always excepted," 
be changed to read "except those 
Fridays which are not feast days, 
and which do not occur during the 
Octaves of Christmas, Easter or 
Corpus Christi." 

7. The Venerable Chapter, after 
mature consideration, deems that 
at present there is not a serious 
reason for changing the Rule of our 
Holy Founder by admitting a Dele- 
gate, from our Missionaries among 
the heathen, to take part in the 
Chapter, with the right of suffrage, 
for the election of Superiors of the 
Province and the Rectors of the 
same. However, there is nothing 
to prevent the admission of such 
a delegate to the Chapter, without 
the right of suffrage, in order that 
the needs and other matters per- 
taining to the Missions may be ad- 
vantageously referred to him. 

8. Six months before the General 
Chapter, each Provincial Curia 
shall send matters to be treated by 
the Chapter to the General Curia, 
whose duty it shall be to arrange 



a complete list of them and send 
them in good time to each of the 
Provincial Curias, in order that they 
may study them. 

9. The Venerable Chapter de- 
clares that there must be at least 
two examiners of our Students, and 
that the dispositions of Most Rev- 
erend Fathers Leo of the Heart of 
Jesus and Titus of Jesus in regard 
to three Examiners have only di- 
rective force. 

10. The Venerable Chapter ex- 
presses its desire that a petition 
be sent to the Holy See to obtain 
permission to insert the "Office of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary, Mediatrix 
of All Graces" in our Proprium, to 
be celebrated by our Religious 
everywhere. 

11. The words of the Holy Rule, 
No. 176 : "In each Province, one or 
more houses shall be set aside for 
study" do not mean that students 
must be placed in all the Retreats 
of the Province. In practice, how- 
ever, it is up to the Major Superiors 
of each Province to determine how 
many and which houses in the Prov- 
ince are to be contituted as properly 
equipped houses of study, in accord- 
ance with Canon 587, Sect. 1. 



35th GENERAL CHAPTER 



General Decrees 

1) The Venerable Chapter, con- 
vinced that " our Congregation is 
based on a most particular spirit 



of prayer, solitude and poverty and 
that as long as this spirit remains 
(which spirit is also the foundation 
of our apostolate) it will always 
shine in the sight of God and men," 



191 



strongly inculcates that all the mem- 
bers of the Congregation, especially 
the Superiors, preserve this spirit 
and strive with all their strength 
to perfect it. 

2) In order that a Decree of a 
General Chapter in our Congrega- 
tion become a permanent norm of 
action, it is necessary that it be 
tried in practice, that it be exam- 
ined and approved a second and a 
third time by the two following 
Chapters, and then, if necessary, 
be confirmed by the Sacred Con- 
gregation of Religious. 

3) Since the Congregation has 
suffered serious harm, both spirit- 
ual and disciplinary, through ap- 
peals made by subjects to the Holy 
See, the present Chapter decrees 
that the following order be ob- 
served : an appeal against a Rector 
is to be made to the Provincial; 
an appeal against a Provincial is 

.-to- .fee made to the General; an ap- 
peal against a General is to be made 
to the General Chapter or to the 
Holy See. Furthermore, this same 
General Chapter admonishes all the 
members that in making appeals 
they be mindful of their state and 
let them know that they burden 
their conscience gravely if they 
dare to reveal any untruth against 
the good or authority of our Con- 
gregation. 

II 
Provinces and Vice Provinces 

4) The judgment as to the feasi- 
bility of erecting a new Province 



is reserved to the General Chapter, 
without prejudice, however, to the 
prescription of Canon 494, 1. 

5) To divide, for very grave rea- 
sons, a Province existing in the 
same political territory under the 
same civil government, it is abso- 
lutely required that there be five 
formal Retreats in which the full 
observance is held, that there be 
at least eighty priests who have 
been professed at least ten years, 
that there remain at least the same 
number of priests and Retreats in 
the Province to be divided, and that, 
in the judgment of the General 
Chapter, all the other requirements 
are present in both Provinces that 
the directive and economic govern- 
ment can be maintained and con- 
tinued. 

6) Having the consent of the 
General Chapter and the Holy See, 
in order to raise a Vice Province 
into a Province in a political ter- 
ritory where as yet no Province 
exists, there must be at least three 
formal Retreats where the full ob- 
servance is kept, at least twenty- 
five priests who are professed ten 
years, and everything else so that 
the directive and economic govern- 
ment can be maintained and con- 
tinued. 

7) By a Vice Province in our 
Congregation is understood two or 
three Retreats joined under one 
Superior who rules them in the] 
name of the General or Provincial, 
in a political territory where as 



192 



yet no canonical Province has been 
erected. 

8) In a political territory under 
the same civil government where 
there exists a canonical Province, 
no Vice Province can be erected. 

9) Vice Provinces made up of 
Retreats belonging to an already 
existing Province remain under the 
jurisdiction of the respective Prov- 
incial, unless the General Curia 
for grave reasons decides other- 
wise. However, if a Vice Province 
is erected from Retreats belonging 
to no established Province, it re- 
mains under the direct jurisdiction 
of the General. 

10) Vice Provinces can be erect- 
ed by the General with the decisive 
vote of his Consultors, after having 
heard the Provincial if there be 
question of Retreats belonging to 
another Province. 

11) A Vice Province is govern- 
ed immediately by a Vice Provin- 
cial and two Consultors, and their 
office lasts three years. 

12) The election of a Vice Prov- 
incial and his Council falls to the 
Provincial Curia if there be ques- 
tion of a Vice Province dependent 
on a Provincial; otherwise this is 
taken care of by the General Curia. 

13) At least three months be- 
fore the election of the Vice Prov- 
incial and his Curia is to take 
place, there shall be a Chapter in 
the Vice Province to discuss mat- 
ters ; at this Chapter, as the case 
may be, the General or the Prov- 



incial presides, or one delegated 
by them. In this Chapter the Vice 
Provincial, his Consultors, all Rec- 
tors, and the Master of Novices 
shall take part. All of these shall 
send a secret report of persons fit 
to have higher offices and shall give 
them to the President; this does 
not exclude the right of any indi- 
vidual religious to send letters re- 
garding persons or suggestions to 
the Chapter. All these reports to- 
gether with the resolutions shall 
be sent to the General Curia, or to 
the Provincial Curia, if the 
Vice Province is subject to the lat- 
ter, in view of elections and making 
decrees. 

14) The election of the Rectors 
and of the Master of Novices must 
take place within a month by the 
new Vice Provincial and his Coun- 
cil observing all that is stated in 
the law on elections. Elections thus 
taken place need the written con- 
firmation of the General. 

15) A Vice Provincial is called 
to the General Chapter t'o make a 
report of his Vice Province; with 
the consent of the same Chapter 
he may have a vote in the busi- 
ness meetings but not in the elec- 
tions. 

16) As for the rest all shall be 
observed that canon law and our 
particular law lay down for Prov- 
inces and Retreats. 

Ill 
Superiors and Their Elections 

17) The General must make a 



193 



visit, either personally or through 
a delegate, to all the Provinces of 
the Congregation every three years 
so that, as the Holy Rule arranges 
in number 243, he can really know 
"if all things are conducted duly 
and rightly" and seasonably "apply 
an immediate remedy to all unbe- 
coming practices." 

18) The delegated Visitator must 
give an accurate report to the Gen- 
eral of the Visitation made and 
inform him of the personal, eco- 
nomic and disciplinary condition of 
the Province and of the remedies 
applied to put aside abuses, if 
there were any. 

19) Provincials and Vice Prov- 
incials must write every three 
months to Father General and in- 
form him of any new developments 
that have taken place in the inter- 
vening time in the Province or 
Vice Province. At the end of the 
year they shall write to Father 
General an account, signed by them- 
selves and their consultors, of the 
annual visitation and the personal, 
economic and disciplinary condition 
of the Province or Vice Province. 

20) The General Chapter decides 
that the faculty of taking the office 
of Pastor, spoken of in the Holy 
Rule number 301, is reserved to 
the General alone. 

21) The Venerable Chapter after 
having pondered all the reasons 
regarding the proposal to send dele- 
gates from the Retreats to the 
Chapters: in view of the contrary 



practice in the Congregation for 
more than two hundred years; in 
view of the Decree of the General 
Chapter XXXI (1920) which de- 
clared : "There is no sufficient rea- 
son at hand to introduce a change 
into our Rule in this matter, since 
every religious is free to give his 
opinion both regarding the merits 
of the eligibles or regarding sug- 
gestions towards the good of the 
Province, by sending a letter to the 
President of the Chapter or to any 
one of the Capitular Fathers;" in 
view of the gravity of introducing 
a change in our Constitutional Law, 
and the desirability of more mature 
counsel and deliberation; in view 
of all the above, then, this Chapter 
by an absolue majority of votes 
decided that it was inopportune to 
introduce so notable a change into 
our Rules especially this year, the 
second centennial of the solemn ap- 
proval of the Rule. 

22) The refusal to renew the pat- 
ent letters for a Rector by a Prov- 
incial according to the Rule num- 
ber 269 has no effect unless ap- 
proved by the General. 

23) The Fathers Provincial 
should, if possible, arrange that 
there be no more than two houses 
of study in their Province: one 
for Philosophy, the other for The- 
ology. 

24) The present General Chap- 
ter renews the decree of the twen- 
ty-third General Chapter (Fourth 
session, Decree two) and at the 



194 



same time imposes a universal ob- 
ligation of having in each Prov- 
ince one year of Sacred Eloquence 
with an examination at the end of 
the year, and this for all except 
those who are sent to a University 
to prepare for some Lectorship or 
are destined for the foreign mis- 
sions. The same Chapter also, con- 
sidering the needs of the time, 
warmly recommends to the Prov- 
incials to add even a second year. 

25) The General Chapter ex- 
presses the wish that the Fathers 
Provincial appoint a Prefect of 
Studies in their Provinces who 
should receive the trimestrial re- 
ports and make up the annual re- 
port to be sent to Father General; 
and he should also further the ef- 
ficiency of our studies under the 
direct dependence of Father Prov- 
incial, y 

Preparatory Seminaries 

26) The Venerable Chapter earn- 
estly asks the Fathers Provincial, 
when admitting students, to bear 
in mind the admonition of His 
Holiness Pope Pius XI, who thus 
addressed all Superiors in the let- 
ters Unigenitus Dei Filius: "Do 
not gather the young boys hastily 
nor in crowds, of whom it is un- 
certain whether they choose such 
a holy life under divine inspira- 
tion." 

27) Since the houses where there 
is a Preparatory Seminary have a 
special character not contemplated 
in our Rules, the General Chapter, 



to obviate difficulties, declares that 
the Provincial with the consent of 
his Consultors may, in the prepar- 
atory Seminaries, appoint a Su- 
perior, removable at wish, if the 
circumstances of the place and 
grave reasons, to be judged by the 
Provincial Chapter before the elec- 
tion of Rectors, advise this. 

28) The present General Chap- 
ter adhering to the eighth decree 
of the Thirtieth General Chapter 
commands that each Provincial see 
to it that a Directory of his Pre- 
paratory Seminary be set up as 
soon as possible, which is to be 
examined and approved by the 
General Curia. 

VI 
Obligations 

29) The General Chapter incul- 
cates the precept of the Holy Rule, 
number 108, in virtue of which the 
individual religious is forbidden to 
accept a stipend for a free Mass, 
recalling hereby any custom or priv- 
ilege or statute to the contrary, and 
this is done upon the advice of the 
Holy See to remove abuses. 

30) The observance of the Holy 
Rule is stressed regarding the cul- 
tivation of lands adjoining the Re- 
treat. If this is impossible on ac- 
count of civil laws or special cir- 
cumstances, then permission is to 
be sought from Father General. 

31) The Venerable Chapter de- 
crees that number 167 of our Reg- 
ulations be thus extended : "The 
ordinary expenses which regard the 



195 



food and the clothing of the Reli- 
gious Community shall be admin- 
istered by the Father Rector with 
the knowledge of his Vicar; other 
expenses, however, even the neces- 
sary expenses are to be adminis- 
tered by the same Rector within 
the limits and norms laid down by 
the General Curia." 

32) A third old habit, made of 
the same ordinary material, is al- 
lowed every religious, to be used, 
however, only when resting in bed. 

33) To the Lectors are also 
granted the extraordinary walks, 
customary for Students, both dur- 
ing the course of the year and dur- 
ing the vacations, observing, how- 
ever, numbers 87, 240, and 241, 
of the Regulations. 

34) The Venerable Chapter earn- 
estly recommends Superiors to 
have in a special way a truly pater- 
nal care of the Lay Brothers and 
give them suitable instructions on 
the religious life, even every week, 
observing most exactly in this mat- 
ter the prescriptions of the Holy 
Rule in numbers 283 and 285, and 
number 296 of the Regulations. 

35) The Venerable Chapter de- 
cides that on Feasts of the First 
Class, even if not of precept, the 
Lay Brothers be present at the 
Solemn High Mass and also for 
the walk in the afternoon, as is 
customary for the clerics and 
Priests. 

36) The Venerable Chapter com- 
mands the Provincials to faithfully 



observe the precautions of the Holy 
Rule. numbers 296 and of the Reg- 
ulations number 96 and of the 
Customs in regard to visiting rela- 
tives. 

37) At the death of the father 
or mother of a Lay Brother or 
Novice or Cleric one Low Mass 
shall be celebrated in the Retreat 
where the respective religious lives 
de Familia. 

38) The Venerable Chapter de- 
clares that broadcasting over the 
radio is not against the spirit of 
our Congregation as long as it is 
used as a medium of the apostolate 
within the recognized bounds of our 
preaching. 

39) The same General Chapter 
commands that the General Curia 
edit a collection of all the decrees 
published by General Chapters 
since the last edition of our Regu- 
lations; and these decrees be read 
four times a year either in the 
choir or refectory. 

40) The General Chapter, recall- 
ing the words of our Holy Rule 
(number 317) which "exhort all 
the brethren of our Congregation 
willingly to contribute such works 
of piety as they will be able to 
perform for the dead," gives its 
approval that the Requiem aetemam 
dona eis, Domine; et lux perpetua 
luceat eis may be added to the reci- 
tation of the Angelus each morning, 
noon and evening, after the three 
Glory be to the Fathers and before 
the salutation of the Angels. 



196 



RULES AND REGULATIONS 



1. Our Holy Rule, first written by 
our Father and Legislator himself, 
has been often confirmed and ap- 
proved by the Apostolic See. The 
first time was by a simple rescript 
of May 15, 1741 ; the second time, 
by the Brief Ad Pastoralis of April 
18, 1746, by which Benedict XIV 
approved and confirmed it. The 
third and more solemn approbation 
was by the Brief of Clement XIV 
Salvatoris et Domini nostri given 
on November 15, 1769. On the fol- 
lowing day of the same year (No- 
vember 16, 1769) the Pontiff sol- 
emnly approved our Congregation 
and confirmed the Rule by the Con- 
stitution Supremi Apostolatus. Pope 
Pius VI again solemnly approved 
the Institute and Rule by the Con- 
stitution Praeclara Virtutum on Oc- 
tober 16, 1775. 

2. Through reverence of the au- 
thor and authorizers of our Rules 
we generally refer to them by the 
term "Holy." By this we mean that 
they were inspired by God and giv- 
en to us as the safest means of 
eternal salvation. As they them- 
selves prescribe, we should guard 
this little volume carefully, so that 
it will not be lost or fall into the 
hands of any outsiders. In fact, we 



should not even read it to anyone 
not of our Congregation. Each re- 
ligious receives one copy of the 
Rule at the beginning of the noviti- 
ate. During the year the Master 
gives the novices a detailed explan- 
ation of it. The clerics receive the 
original Latin text, the brothers 
an authentic vernacular translation, 
although outside Italy it is the prac- 
tice to give a translation to every- 
one. When a religious dies — or if 
he has to be dismissed — the Super- 
ior holds the book for the Father 
Provincial. 

3. We are exhorted by the Holy 
Rule itself to read it frequently. 
This exhortation is satisfied by 
listening to the public reading in 
the refectory, according to the pre- 
scription of the Regulations. But 
those religious are to be commend- 
ed who have the practice of daily 
reading some section. From the 
novitiate on, the students are 
taught to read two pages of either 
the Holy Rule or the Regulations 
daily before spiritual reading. The 
Holy Rule prescribes that mission- 
aries should read Chapter XXIV on 
their knees before the Blessed Sac- 
rament as often as they go out for 
missions. This has always been 



197 



understood of a formal mission. 

4. What we have said of the Holy 
Rule is to be understood propor- 
tionately of the Regulations. The 
book must be kept safely and be 
given to no outsider to read. Both 
the Holy Rule and the Regulations 
are read publicly in the refectory, 
and the religious listen with heads 
uncovered. The book of Regula- 
tions is also given to novices and 
the Master explains them as he 
does the Rule. 

5. The main author of the Regu- 
lations was our Holy Founder him- 
self, who ordered that they be read 
from time to time in choir. After- 
wards they were increased by the 
addition of new explanations and 
decrees of General Chapters. At 
first there was a manuscript edi- 
tion, which had to be read in each 
retreat thrice a year instead of the 
usual spiritual reading in choir. In 
1860 a careful redaction was made 
and printed, receiving the approval 
of the General Chapter shortly af- 

SACRISTY 



ter. It was decreed that they be 
read not in choir, but in the refec- 
tory alternately with the Rule, so 
that each should be read at least 
once during the year. In time new 
decrees were added by subsequent 
General Chapters, and some of the 
old ones fell into disuse for various 
reasons; so in 1878 the General 
Chapter ordered that a new and 
revised edition be made. The latest 
edition was committed to the care 
or the General Curia by the Chapter 
of 1931 ; it was completed in Latin 
in 1935. This edition, which now 
has the force of law, is what we call 
simply the Regulations, that is the 
compilation of suggestions and or- 
ders which interpret the mind of 
the Holy Rule and give provisions 
for certain cases. The reading of 
the Holy Rule in the refectory is 
introduced by the words : "Our 
Holy Rules and Constitutions" ; the 
Regulations, by: "Our Regula- 
tions." 



1. What our Holy Rule (n. 112- 
113) prescribes for the church is 
to be understood also of the sacris- 
ty. There should be a table suffi- 
ciently long to accommodate the 
number of priests who must vest 
simultaneously. The vestments are 
placed in an orderly way on this 
table, together with a chalice and 
biretta for each set. There should 
be a small drawer where host for 
Mass, hosts for the servers, and 
the tabernacle key are kept. In an- 



other drawer can be kept the puri- 
ficators, neatly folded, unless each 
priest keeps his own wrapped in his 
amice. 

The Mass book is kept on a 
small table in the sacristy. In one 
of the corners of the room is a 
basin where the priests can wash 
their hands. There should be a 
place to hang one's mantle, or at 
least some chairs. The Ordo is 
kept in a prominent place, as also 
a card indicating the name of the 



198 



diocesan bishop and the Oratio 
Imperata. There should be some 
violet stoles at hand for the use 
of confessors, and a stole the color 
of the day for the administration 
of Holy Communion. The sacristy 
should have a Ritual, in case need- 
ed. The missals are kept in the 
vestment case.. It is good to have 
a couple of prie-dieu's and cards 
with the preparation and thanks- 
giving for Mass for the priests, 
especially seculars. It is also a good 
practice to have on the wall a list 
of cases reserved in the diocese, of 
decrees of the Ordinary of the 
place, of the perpetual Mass obliga- 
tions (if any), and of privileges 
enjoyed in the church. 

If the sacristy is large enough, 
there may be cabinets for candela- 
bra, flowers, vases, etc. Otherwise, 
these must be kept elsewhere. How- 
ever, the vestments and other sac- 
red articles used for Mass are 
kept in the vestment case, each in 
its place. Each drawer shall have 
a sign identifying its contents: e.g. 
purificators, amices, chasubles, 
copes, etc., so that things can be 
easily found in the absence of the 
Sacristan. 



2. It is the sacristan's duty to 
mop the floor once a week, or more 
often, if needed ; daily to dust the 
tables, benches, chairs ; to prepare 
the vestments and mark the mis- 
sals; to cut the hosts; to bring 
water for the wash-basin ; in short, 
to prepare everything for Mass and 
sacred functions. He should do all 
this the evening of the preceding 
day. In retreats where the General, 
the Provincial or a Visitator is 
present, special vestments shall be 
put out for them, together with a 
surplice for the server. 

3. The sacristan should likewise 
watch the sacred vestments to see 
when they need repairing. He puri- 
fies the corporals and purificators, 
according to the rubrics, before 
sending them with the other linens 
to the laundry. He receives visiting 
priests, and after Mass gives them 
breakfast, first getting permission 
from the Superior. After the morn- 
ing prayer he puts away the vest- 
ments and does whatever other 
work he has time for. If a student 
has the office of sacristan, the Di- 
rector should watch that all the 
above matters are observed. 



SECULAR GUESTS 



1. Besides those who come to 
our monasteries for spiritual re- 
treats, we have the practice of 
showing hospitality to secular men 
for other reasons as well. In receiv- 
ing such, the Superior should make 
sure: a) that the person is known, 



at least through trustworthy let- 
ters of recommendation; b) that 
ordinarily his stay be brief; c) that 
the same person be not received 
too often. Whatever be the reason 
for their visit, the Superior puts 
them in charge of the Retreat Di- 



199 



rector, who shall care for them and 
see that they accommodate them- 
selves to the horarium of the com- 
munity. We must insist on the pre- 
script of the Holy Rule and the 
Regulations in the matter of admit- 
ting these guests to the common 
meals with the religious. Except- 
ing benefactors, the parents of the 
religious, and others to whom we 
are indebted, all others are to be 
treated in the same way as retreat- 
ants, if indeed, with as much lib- 
erality. 

2. In Italian retreats, remote 
from towns and villages, there is 
at least one room on the first floor 
near the main entrance for the re- 
ception of women who ask to speak 
with one of the religious, or who 
come to visit the church. This room 
should have a door opening to the 
outside. The key is kept by the Su- 
perior, who alone has the right to 
admit externs. There is no furni- 
ture in this room beside a simple 
table, some chairs, and a few pic- 
tures on the walls. At a suitable 
place there shall be an opening in 
the wall with a wooden turntable; 
on this shall be passed through 
whatever is necessary for the 
guest; the folding doors over the 
turntable shall always be locked, 
and the key kept by the Superior or 
by a religious he deputes. On days 
when this guest room has been 
used, the doors both to the outside 
and to the inside are to be locked 
after the bell for night prayers. In 
certain cases in very remote re- 



treats this room can be used as a 
sleeping room for women ; a bed is 
brought in and other adaptations 
are made. But this should be avoid- 
ed as far as possible, and the Su- 
perior should try to make other pro- 
visions so this will not happen. 
There should be no boisterousness 
allowed when the guests converse or 
eat together; nor should they play 
games. The religious should not 
waste too much time entertaining 
seculars, especially when they 
should be attending the observance. 
In this the Superiors have always 
been first in giving good example. 
3. Outside Italy, wherever there 
are different customs and usages, 
it is permitted to have a parlor for 
the reception of women, between 
the main entrance and the corri- 
dor, but outside the cloister. The 
doors of this room are to have a 
glass panel, so as to allow the visi- 
tors to be seen. The parlor is to 
be furnished according to the prac- 
tice of the country, but without any 
luxuriousness. There is no turn- 
table as in Italy, but all the above- 
mentioned cautions and any pro- 
vincial chapter decrees are to be 
observed. It should be sufficient 
merely to mention here the dictate 
common to the Holy Rule and the 
Regulations and deeply felt by our 
elders, that it is not the sign of a 
well ordered interior to be fond of 
associating with seculars and to 
frequent the parlor, save under obe- 
dience and in a case of real neces- 
sity. (Continued on page 248) 



200 




PASSIONIST NEWS REVIEW 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 



Chicago 



The summer months have brought 
their usual number of arrivals and 
departures to Immaculate Conception 
Retreat. Among the de familia 
changes which marked the season, 
the Community welcomed several 
new members, including Rev. Frs. 
Aurelius, Gregory McEttrick, Joseph 
Mary (who recently returned from 
Rome), John Baptist (another Ro- 
man student), Carroll and Simon. 
The Community lost Fr. Howard 
(to Cincinnati), Fr. Conrad (to 
Detroit) and Fr. Keith (to Des 
Moines). July 14 saw the arrival of 
nine students from Des Moines to 
replace the six who left for Louis- 
ville two days later. The new-comers 
are Confraters Myron, Denis, Albert, 
Eugene, Meinrad, Bruce, and Bereli- 
mans, with whom has been combined 
the following class of Confrs. Fran- 
cis Martin and Carl Anthony. 



The Community was host to two 
Japanese seminarians during the 
middle of July. The two young men 
were en route to St. Mary's, Baltimore 
for their course of Theology. They 
hail from Osaka, the see of Bishop 
Paul Taguchi, whom we had the 
honor to have with us during the 
past Spring. 



Kenneth Cappadice, a brother pos- 
tulant from Chicago's South Side, 
departed for the Novitiate, after 
spending a three months trial here. 
All who have seen his conscientious 
work unite in asking God's blessing 
for perseverance in his vocation. . . . 
Fr. Benedict and Fr. David Knott are 
well, it is a pleasure to report. The 
arrival of Fr. Aurelius has done 
much to brighten Fr. Benedict's day. 
... A three-car garage is in the plan- 
ning stage. It will be placed across 
the rear drive from the old laundry. 



201 



Very Rev. Fr. Neil, with the help of 
Fr. Paul and the Students, is build- 
ing the long-awaited garage. 



The Community took great pleas- 
ure in welcoming Rev. Fr. Joseph 
Mary, C.P., home from Rome, where 
he has just completed the work for 
his Doctorate in Sacred Theology. 
Fr. Joseph Mary defended his thesis 
"The Development of the Doctrine 
of St. Thomas Aquinas on the Pas- 
sion and death of Our Lord" before 
two outstanding Thomistic stal- 
warts, Very Rev. Fr. Michael 
Browne, O. P., Master of the 
Sacred Palace, and Very Rev. Fr. 
Francis Ceuppens, O.P., Rectof of 
the Angelicum, and was rewarded 
with a superb summa cum laude. It 
was at the suggestion of Very Rev. 
Fr. Browne, O.P., "the Pope's own 
Theologian" as the Master of the 
Sacred Palace is called, that Fr. 
Joseph Mary reorientated his thesis 
back to his original plan, as above. 
"Never have I seen such a collation 
of the texts of St. Thomas Aquinas," 
was his comment upon his first in- 
spection of Fr. Joseph Mary's able 
work. Congratulations on an ex- 
cellent job well done! 

Cincinnati 

The Committee for the revision of 
our Provincial Directory for Missions 
and Retreats met at Holy Cross 
Monastery, July 9th. The committee, 
composed of Rev. Frs. Stanislaus, 
Alban and Emmanuel (Secretary), 
will also revise all our Mission Liter- 
ature. 

Within the space of five days, due 
to intensive preparation, all matters 



had been discussed, and the new Di- 
rectory was practically completed. 
It will embody the conclusions and 
recommendations of the Missionary 
Congress, held in 1945 at St. Louis. 

There is every reason to hope that 
this effort will prove a blessing to 
the Missionaries, and make our work 
in the Missions even more consoling 
and helpful. 

The new Directory, it is reported, 
will be sent to all the houses of the 
Province, for suggestions and pos- 
sible emendations and improvements. 



It will be great news to the many 
men of the Province, who have at one 
time or another been stationed at 
Holy Cross Monastery, to hear that 
the Old Cathedral, St. Peter in 
Chains, is to be restored as the 
Cathedral Church of the Archdiocese 
of Cincinnati. The decision to restore 
the Old Cathedral was announced 
by Archbishop Karl J. Alter, June 
22, 1951. 

St. Monica's Church has served as 
the Cathedral since 1938. 

The decision has special signifi- 
cance, due to the fact that St. Peter 
in Chains is the mother church of 
the whole Province. It is also of 
outstanding architectual impor- 
tance, because the Old Cathedral 
is the most impressive example of the 
Greek Revival period in Cincinnati. 

A further reason for the restor- 
ation of the Cathedral in the down- 
town area is the development of the 
Cincinnati master plan to the west 
of the city. St. Peter's central loca- 
tion makes it easily accessible from 
every point in the metropolitan 
area. The proximity of the Union 



202 



Terminal, the major hotels and the 
numerous parking lots make this 
site practical for special ceremonies 
that will bring out-of-town visitors 
to Cincinnati. 

The Cathedral, when completed, 
will occupy the entire area from Plum 
to Central Avenue, and from 8th 
Street to the alley-way on the south 
side of the property. The body of the 
Cathedral will be enlarged, increas- 
ing the seating capacity, which at 
present holds 1200. A new Rectory 
is also part of the development. 

The approximate cost of the ex- 
tensive remodeling and renovating, 
together with the new additions, will 
be $1,000,000. 



On June 22, Rev. Fr. Raphael cele- 
brated his 40th Anniversary in the 
Priesthood. The Community assisted 
at a Solemn Mass sung by Fr. Ra- 
phael that morning. Father is pro- 
ceeding prosperously with his writ- 
ing. His latest pamphlet "I'll not 
be a Traitor!", the story of St. Vin- 
cent Mary Strambi, will soon be pub- 
lished by The Grail, at St. Meinrad's 
Abbey. Fr. Raphael, at the request 
of The Grail, is now working on the 
life of Blessed Pius X. Like his other 
works, this will be read to the Lay 
Retreatants before it is published. 

The Martha Kinney Cooper 
Ohioana Library Association, a group 
whose purpose is to honor Ohio 
Authors and Composers, recently 
informed Fr. Raphael, through its 
Hamilton County Committee, that he 
is to be listed among those so honor- 
ed in 1951, for his booklet "Sweet 
Are These Tears," the life of Mother 
Seton. Among the prominent spons- 
ors of this Association are Bishop 



Ready of Columbus, and Msgr. 
William Anthony of Cincinnati. It 
is composed of Protestants, Catholics 
and Jews. 

Rev. Fr. Alphonsus returned from 
the Cardome Visitation Monastery 
and Academy near Georgetown, Ken- 
tucky. At the personal request of His 
Excellency, Bishop Mulloy of Coving- 
ton, Kentucky, Fr. Alphonsus had 




Rev, Fr. Raphael, C.P. who recently 
completed a new pamphlet life of 
St. Vincent Strambi. 



203 



served the spiritual and religious 
interests of the Sisters and the stu- 
dent body for many months. 

An interesting note: Mother Jane 
Francis Blakely, the present Super- 
ioress of Cardome, is a sister of the 
nationally known writer, lecturer and 
Editor of America, Fr. Paul Blakely, 
S.J., now dead. She is the niece of 
Fr. Aloysius Blakely, C.P., a gifted 
linguist who served many years ago 
as Vicar General, to our Bishop in 
Bulgaria, and who was later appoint- 
ed as confessor to all the French 
and Spanish speaking peoples in the 
Diocese of Scranton, by Bishop 
Hoban of that Diocese. 



train by Fr. Charles and a Com- 
mittee of Officers of the Laymen's 
Retreat League. 



Rev. Fr. Charles, Guilfoyle C.P. 

has been relieved temporarily of the 
Directorship of the Laymen's Re- 
treats here because of his health. He 
did a splendid job, and was very pop- 
ular with the men because of his un- 
tiring efforts in their behalf. His 
great energy and zeal endeared him 
to the laity and clergy of the sur- 
rounding territory. We hope that his 
health improves so that he can re- 
turn to Retreat work in the near 
future. 

Under Fr. Charles' Directorship, 
the first laymen's retreat was held 
here at Holy Cross, with a group 
from St. Philomena's Church, June 
6-8, 1947. To date, 2400 men have 
made 4100 retreats in 171 groups. 
43 parishes have sent organized 
groups, three of them two groups. 
Rev. Fr. Wilfrid, C.P. has been ap- 
pointed to succeed Fr. Charles as 
Director of the Laymen's Retreats, 
and will prove to be another popular 
Director. Fr. Wilfrid was met at the 



Rev. Fr. Robert Cook, C.P., until 
recently the Retreat Master at Holy 
Cross, leaves for Detroit to fulfill 
the same office there. He did an 
excellent job as Retreat Master. His 
sermons were very practical, and 
elicited the enthusiastic praise of the 
Retreatants for the "man-to-man" 
character of his conferences. 

Besides doing an excellent job as 
Retreat Master, Fr. Robert is also 
a strong proponent of the Christo- 
pher Movement. During the past 
year he has given a number of lec- 
tures to various groups in the Cin- 
cinnati area, explaining the Move- 
ment and showing how it applies 
to individual groups. 

Rev. Fr. Howard, C.P., recently 
assigned here, will continue to carry 
out the Good Counsel Club Program. 
Before leaving Chicago, Fr. Howard 
asked H i s Eminence, Cardinal 
Stritch to appoint one of his priests 
Spiritual Director of the Chicago 
Unit. 

On July 16th, Fr. Howard went to 
St. Louis to present the Club Pro- 
gram to about 500 Sisters of St. 
Joseph at the Fontbonne College. 
This Vocation Day should very 
greatly aid in the development of 
vocations. 

The Good Counsel Club literature 
is now being handled by the J. S. 
Paluch Co., Inc. (P.O. Box 3386, 
Chicago 54, Illinois). In the future, 
copies of "What Others Have Done" 
and "What Parents Have Done" may 
be obtained from this address. Mr. 



204 



Paluch also promises to publish a 
new edition of the Good Counsel 
Club Handbook this Fall. 



Short Notes: Rev. Fr. Kenny, C.P. 

was here on a farewell visit recently 
— saying goodbye to his folks as he 
embarks for Korea as a replacement 
Chaplain in the fighting front. May 
Our Lord and our Blessed Lady bring 
him back safely again. — The four 
new members of our Community are 
Frs. Louis, Angelo (Retreat Master), 
Howard and Wilfrid (Retreat Di- 
rector). They replace Frs. Sylvester, 
Charles, Robert, Eustace, Lambert, 
and Ferdinand, who have gone to 
other houses in the Province. — It 
was a pleasure to welcome Fr. Eus- 
tace McDonald, of the Eastern Prov- 
ince, July 23. He was en route to 
Wichita Falls, Texas, where he has 
been assigned as Chaplain in the 
Air Force. — Rev. Fr. Boniface spent 
a month with us, during which time 
he gave four very successful re- 
treats to the Franciscan Fathers in 
this area. — Rev. Fr. Eustace conduct- 
ed a week-end retreat for Coloured 
High School girls at Camp St. Joseph 
at Harrison, Indiana, a splendid 
location on the White Water River, 
used exclusively for Negroes. It is 
conducted by the Franciscan Mis- 
sionaries of Mary. Rev. Fr. Daniel 
conducted a similar retreat for Color- 
ed Women at the same camp, June 
22-24. 



Louisville 

Sacred Heart Retreat saw the ar- 
rival of another class of Students 
July 16, to take up their studies in 



Moral Theology and Canon Law. 
They are Confraters Paul Mary, 
Augustine Paul, Joachim, Bede, Rian, 
and Jude. Two days later the newly- 
ordained class left for Sierra Madre 
and a year devoted to Sacred Elo- 
quence. 

Rev. Fr. Forrest, C.P., recently 
returned from Rome, where he had 
taken special studies in Canon Law. 
With the coming of the present 
school term, he replaced Rev. Fr. 
Hubert as Lector of Canon Law and 
Morals. For Fr. Hubert, it was the 
end of a very successful job of teach- 
ing, one that lasted for many years. 



St. Agnes Parish held its annual 
Carnival August 3-4. It proved to 
be a great success, after an intense 
advertising campaign by the Carni- 
val Committee. The crowds probably 
surpassed those of any other Carni- 
val in the history of the parish. 



On September 20, Rev. Fr. Charles 
Cassidy, C.P. will celebrate the 
Golden Jubilee of his Ordination to 
the Priesthood, with a Solemn Mass 
and other appropriate celebrations, 
in St. Agnes Church. Rev. Fr. Ig- 
natius Conroy, C.P., will preach the 
sermon for the occasion. The Prov- 
ince unites in wishing Fr. Charles 
"ad multos annos." 



St. Paul 

The Community at St. Francis 
Monastery was very agreeably 
pleased to welcome back one of its 
earliest members, Rev. Fr. Linus 
Monahan, of the Eastern Province, 
and with him, Fr. Bonaventure Gon- 
nella, C.P. Rev. Fr. Linus was or- 



205 



dained to the priesthood in St. Fran- 
cis Church fifty years ago, May 16, 

1901. 

The new class of postulants ar- 
rived at the Novitiate June 12, 
eleven strong. This group, together 
with William Connolly of Des Moines, 
was vested in the holy habit by 
Very Rev. Fr. Elmer, Rector, on 
July 8th. Their names: John Dolenz 
(Edwin), Allen Cahill (Cletus), Paul 
Kenney (Kevin), Francis King (Am- 
brose), Richard Gardiner (Andrew 
Mary), Paul Balog (Stephen), Don- 
ald Giegerich (Vincent), Paul Cole- 
man (Bernard), Thomas Kosatka 
(Leonard), Robert Appiarius (Ger- 
ald), Richard Doherty (Louis) and 
William Connolly (Joseph Mary). 
Another member of the class, Paul 
Schaefer, was vested July 31, and 
took the name Philip. 



Profession of the six young men who 
had just completed their year of No- 
vitiate: Conf raters Raphael, Bene- 
dict, Theodore, Owen, Francis and 
Casimir. Another novice, Confr. Se- 
bastian, was professed August 26, 
and left immediately to join his class 
in Des Moines. 



July 9th also noted the 50th Anni- 
versary of the Profession of Rev. 
Fr. Hyacinth, C.P. Father celebrated 
the day with a Solemn High Mass, 
at which the Community attended, 
followed by a banquet dinner in 
honor of the jubilarian. That after- 
noon, the day of Profession, Very 
Rev. Fr. James Patrick, Provincial, 
delegated Rev. Fr. Hyacinth to re- 
ceive the vows of the six young men 
who were to make their profession. 



The following day saw the first 



Friday, July 13, saw the crest of 
the worst flood in St. Paul's his- 




View taken from the tower of St. Francis Hieronymo Church, showing the 
flooded Neosho in the distance. In the foreground may be seen St. Francis 
School, with its new Manual Training Building. Across the road, to the left, 
is the new Sister's Convent. 



206 




New Convent of the Sisters of St. Joseph, at St. Paul, Kansas. It was 
opened this September. 



tory reach several feet higher than 
any known before. The afternoon 
before, the Novices took a walk to 
the bridge West of town; twenty- 
four hours later, the road and bridge 
were five feet underwater. It is said 
that the Neosho River rose over 
eight feet in a matter of four hours. 
The roar of the water rushing 
through the tree-tops could be heard 
continuously at the Monastery. 

Fortunately, it was only the ele- 
ments of excitement and inconveni- 
ence that affected the Monastery. 
It was a disaster, however, for many 
of the parishioners and country folk 
along the river basin. A number of 
small farm homes and barns on the 
Island were demolished or moved 
by the waters. All crops in the val- 
ley were completely lost. Much live- 
stock also perished. There was, 
thankfully, no loss of life in the 



vicinity. 

The height to which the waters 
rose surpassed anything formerly 
experienced, and resulted in many 
tales (funny if they were not also 
so sad) of forced exodus by those 
who moved to the second floor, then 
to the attic, and finally to the house- 
top, claiming "the river never came 
this high before." 

City water was restored after a 
few days. In the meantime the Mon- 
astery's requirements were met by 
harnessing the gasoline motors from 
the lawn mowers to the cistern 
pumps. Another motor was connect- 
ed to the compressor for the large 
ice-box, thus enabling us to pre- 
serve foodstuffs while the electric 
current was interrupted. A floating 
home had knocked down a power 
pole. 

Rev. Fr. Cormac, Vicar, Rev. Fr. 



207 



Alvin, Vice- Master, and the Novice 
Brothers deserve a word of special 
commendation for their calm and 
generous service during the emer- 
gency. Very Rev. Fr. Elmer, Rec- 
tor, Very Rev. Fr. Faustinus, Master 
of Novices, Rev. Fr. Christopher and 
Brother Philip were caught on the 
other side of the waters. They had 
driven the new class of Professed 
to Des Moines, and were unable to 
make their way back through the 
Kansas City disaster area. 

The Camp at the river was filled 
with water, to the height of the win- 
dow tops, and the receding waters 
left a two to three inch deposit of 
silt covering everything. Other than 
the loss of the steps and some scaf- 
folding erected in preparation for 
some repairs there was no other 
loss. The camp known to many of 
the Fathers of the Province as Hook 
Linden's was swept away. 



August 4th marked the 89th birth- 
day of Rev. Fr. Matthew Miller, C.P. 

The Province takes this occasion to 
send its congratulations. 



Rev. Fr. Christopher has turned 
over his office of Pastor of St. Fran- 
cis Church to Rev. Fr. Brendan, C.P. 

Father Christopher's years as Pas- 
tor at St. Paul have been successful 
and constructive. Notable among his 
achievements are the new Sisters' 
Convent and the new Manual Train- 
ing building at St. Francis School. 
Fr. Brendan has the services of Rev. 
Fr. Jordan, who was assigned to St. 
Paul as Assistant Pastor. 



Des Moines 

On July 9th, at St. Gabriel Re- 
treat, Father Rector received the 
final profession of seven students in 
the presence of the community. They 
were: Conf raters Myron, Denis, Al- 
bert, Eugene, Meinrad, Bruce, and 
Berchmans. These, together with 
two others, Confraters Francis Mar- 
tin and Cary Anthony, left for Chi- 
cago July 14th to begin Theology. 

Six newly-professed students drove 
up from Kansas July 12th braving 
the record-breaking floods all along 
their route. 

Departures from the community: 
Fathers Hilary, Louis, Ronan, Jor- 
dan and Rene. Fathers Cornelius, 
Sylvester, Keith, and three young 
priest from California, Randal, 
Clyde and Loran have taken their 
place. 



Plans are progressing towards a 
successful Centenary celebration in 
Des Moines. It is reported that His 
Excellency, Bishop Daly of Des 
Moines has consented to pontificate 
on that occasion in the Cathedral of 
St. Ambrose. 



Detroit 

The new public school, which has 
been under construction for the past 
several months, opened its doors for 
the new school term. The building 
is situated a bare hundred feet south 
of our handball court, within several 
hundred feet of St. Paul's Monastery. 



Brother Aloysius returned from the 
hospital during the last days of 
June. He has not recovered sufficient- 



208 



ly from his stroke to write and thank 
all those who remembered him in 
their Masses and prayers, and wishes 
to take this opportunity of doing so. 
The present picture of Brother Aloys- 
ius was taken shortly after his re- 
turn from the hospital. Brother 
asks a continued remembrance in 
the prayers of the Brethren. 



ception of the remaining three Nuns) 
were present at the funeral. 



Saturday, June 30, saw the funer- 
al of Mrs. Margaret Cichanski, moth- 
er of our Rev. Fr. Sylvester, C.P., at 

St. Mary's of Redford. Mrs. Cichan- 
ski was 82 years of age, the mother 
of 12 children, five of whom were 
Religious, Fr. Sylvester and his four 
sisters, all Dominicans. All the chil- 
dren save one (a Cloistered Domini- 
can, who preceded her mother in 
death) are living, and (with the ex- 




Sierra Madre 

Mater Dolorosa Community has 

ten new members acclimating them- 
selves to sunny California. Rev. Fr. 
Ferdinand arrived in June, and was 
followed, in mid-July, by Rev. Fr. 
Theophane. Brother Joseph arrived 
in early-June. On July 20th, the 
Sacred Eloquence class arrived from 
Louisville to begin their year of 
practice for the Mission and Retreat 
field, under Fr. Maurice's tutelage. 



The recently disbanded class of 
young priests left for the "East" on 
July 25th. Fr. Carroll went to Chi- 
cago, where he will prepare for Sa- 
cred Scripture, accompanied by Fr. 
Simon, who has been assigned to 
Vocational Work. Frs. Randal, Clyde 
and Loran went to Des Moines, the 
first to prepare for Philosophy, the 
latter two for works of the ministry. 
Fr. Firmian was assigned to St. Paul 
as Vice-Master, replacing Fr. Alvin, 
who has gone to St. Louis as Vice- 
Director of Students. 



Rev. Fr. Kenny, C.P., visited here 
on his way to his port of embarka- 
tion. He left soon after for Korea, 
and the fighting zone. 



Brother Aloysius, C.P. 



The Fourth Annual Family Fiesta, 
sponsored by the Mater Dolorosa 
Laymen's Retreat League for the 
purpose of raising sufficient funds 
to make the annual payment on the 
new Retreat House, was held on ^the 
Monastery grounds June 17. The 



209 



Fiesta was blessed with a perfect 
day. An estimated 14,000 people were 
in attendance. The Dinner Com- 
mittee served 4514 ham dinners from 
noon until 6 p.m. 

The Sar Raffle Committee had 
placed three automobiles on the tick- 
et this year: an Oldsmobile 88, a 
DeSoto and a Plymouth. Tickets 
sold for 500 each. A fourth car, a 
Deluxe Pontiac, was given away as 
a seller's award. All the cars were 
won by retreatants, with the ex- 
ception of the DeSoto, won by Mrs. 
Robert Hoy, a member of St. Dom- 
inic's Parish, in Eagle Rock, Cali- 
fornia. 

Financially, the Fiesta was a grand 
success, and on July 1st the annual 
payment of $40,000 was made, be- 
sides the interest on the remainder 
of the loan. 



the coming of the Christian Brothers 
to the Diocese of Sacramento. 



Citrus Heights 

At Christ the King Retreat House, 

the laymen's retreat work has. shown 
most encouraging progress. Despite 
the warm weather and summer at- 
tractions, the attendance has been 
at capacity, and for the last several 
weeks, over capacity. The last week 
in July saw a record crowd of 38 
men, necessitating extra cots and 
beds in several of the rooms. 



Shortly before Graduation the 
seniors from the Christian Brothers 
High School were out for a Day of 
Recollection. Recently, Christ the 
King was host to all the Brothers, 
who came out for dinner and a 
social visit. That day, it turned out, 
was the seventy-fifth anniversary of 



One of the Retreatants generously 
donated a large air cooler to the 
Retreat House. The original cost was 
in the neighbourhood of $3000. Now 
that is has been connected, things 
have been much more pleasant for 
the retreatants on week-ends. 



Recently the black-top walks, for 
the outdoor Way of the Cross, were 
laid in the grove across the road 
from the Retreat House. 



Our Parishes 

Immaculate Conception Parish 

held its Carnival on the four days 
from June 28 to July 1. The principal 
drawing cards were the Bonds given 
away in the Grand Raffle, one $1,000, 
one $500, and one $200, and two $100 
and two $50 Bonds. The Carnival 
was a big success, and the $10,000 
profit will help the Parish pay for 
the expansion taking place at Im- 
maculate Conception School. 

St. Gemma Parish had a very at- 
tractive list of prizes lined up for 
its Carnival, which was held the 
week of June 17. There was the First 
Prize, a Chevrolet, followed by a 
Bendix T. V., a Norge Freezer, a 
Conlon Ironer, Dinner Set, Clock 
Radio and Nesco Roaster. The net 
profit from the Carnival was $3,500. 

St. Rita Parish, at Sierra Madre, 
California passed over to the hands 
of the Diocesan Clergy early in 
August. The Passionists were in 
charge of the Parish for approxi- 
mately 30 years, and during that 



210 



time have done much good and made 
friends in and around the Parish. 

Holy Family Parish, at Ensley, 
now sports a new soft ball team, 
organized by Rev. Fr. Carl. The team 
plays under the lights once a week 
at Memorial Park — in uniform. 
Other work continues to progress. 
Externally, the Church and School 
windows have undergone a fresh 
coat of paint. 



St. Mary's Church and School, at 

Fairfield, continues to grow. The 
school will have four new class 
rooms when school opens this Sep- 
tember. Fr. Edmund is doing the 
work. The four rooms on the second 
floor were never completed, due to 
lack of funds. Now, however, they 
are being completed to add to the 
enrollment of St. Mary's. 



THE PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 



Recently our province had the 
pleasure of felicitating two jubilar- 
ians of special note. One was Fr. 
Linus Monahan, who celebrated the 
fiftieth anniversary of his priestly 
ordination. The other was Fr. Cy- 
prian McGarvey, who celebrated the 
sixtieth anniversary of his religious 
profession. Of these two distinguish- 
ed jubilarians the following notices 
appeared in The New York Catholic 
News, May 19, 1951. 

Rev. Linus Monahan, C.P., former 
Provincial Consultor of the Passion- 
ist Fathers, returned last week to 
the Passionist Monastery, St. Paul, 
Kansas, scene of his ordination, to 
celebrate the golden jubilee of his 
priesthood. 

The jubilarian, whose long and 
able career has been marked with 
many positions of responsibility, ob- 
served the occasion with a Solemn 
High Mass of Thanksgiving on 
Wednesday, May 16, at St. Francis 
Passionist Monastery Church in St. 
Paul. It was here that Father Mona- 
han was ordained to the priesthood, 
May 16, 1901, by the late Bishop 
John J. Hennessy, of Wichita, Kans., 



from whom he also received Tonsure, 
Minor Orders, Subdiaconate and 
Diaconate, at ceremonies held in the 
same church. During his stay in 
St. Paul, Father Monahan was the 
guest of the rector of the monastery. 

Prior to leaving for the Mid-west, 
the septuagenarian celebrated a 
High Mass of Thanksgiving at Our 
Lady of Sorrows Monastery, West 
Springfield, Mass., attended by the 
community of which he is a member. 
After the Mass, he was honored at 
a banquet in the monastery and 
given a spiritual bouquet by the com- 
munity. 

Over a span of 40 years, Father 
Monahan has preached more than 
750 parish missions and retreats to 
priests and nuns of Eastern United 
States. 

He supervised the construction of 
our major Passionist buildings — St. 
Ann's School Auditorium, Scranton, 
where he was pastor, 1906-08; the 
wing of St. Paul's Monastery, Pitts- 
burgh, while vice-rector, 1916-20, and 
the north wing of St. Michael's Mon- 
astery, Union City, during his tenure 
as rector, 1926-29. 



211 



He also served as rector, vice- 
rector and pastor of St. Michael's 
here and St. Mary's, Dunkirk, and 
as retreat master of St. Paul's, 
Pittsburgh, 1941-45; St. Gabriel's, 
Boston, 1945-47, and Our Mother of 
Sorrows, West Springfield, 1947-49. 
During the early years of his priest- 
hood, he assisted the master of 
novices at St. Paul's — the famous 
Passionist convert and missionary, 
Fidelis Kent-Stone. He was also 
professor and director of students 
at St. Francis, 1904-06. He was sta- 
tioned as a missionary at Immacu- 
late Conception Monastery, Jamaica, 
N. Y., 1935-41. 

Father Monahan was born June 
4, 1851, in Liverpool, England, the 
son of Michael and Ann Kelleher 
Monahan. He came to the United 
States with his parents, when 12 
years old, and was educated in public 
schools of Hoboken and New York 
City. In 1892, he entered the noviti- 
ate at St. Paul's Monastery, and was 
professed a Passionist the following 
year. He made his studies for the 
priesthood in the Passionist Semi- 
naries in St. Louis, Mo., Louisville, 
Ky., Pittsburgh, and Hoboken. 

He is a brother of Sister Joseph 
Leo, at St. Joseph's Hospital, Pat- 
terson, N. J., a member of the Sis- 
ters of Charity of Convent Station, 
N. J.; Miss Anna M. Monahan, both 
of Girard, Ohio, and James J. Mona- 
han, Palisades Park, N. J. 

"Fr. Cyprian McGarvey, C.P., Pre- 
fect of Studies for 25 years of the 
Eastern Province of the Passionist 
Fathers, today observed the 60t'h 
anniversary of his profession as a 
Passionist. 



Joining with the veteran educator 
as he celebrated a jubilee Mass of 
Thanksgiving was the entire com- 
munity of priests, students and 
Brothers at St. Michael's Monastery 
here, where he has been stationed 
for the last 28 years. 

Congratulatory messages were re- 
received today by the septuagenar- 
ian from his former students, some 
of whom have achieved notable suc- 
cess as missionaries, professors, rec- 
tors, and members of the Provincial 
Curia. 

One of his former theology stu- 
dents, later raised to the Episco- 
pate, is Most Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, 
C. P., Bishop of Yuanling, China, 
who was seized and imprisoned two 
weeks ago by the Chinese Commun- 
ists, together with Father Paul 
Ubinger, C.P., of Pittsburgh, and Fa- 
ther Bede Chang, native priest. 

Father McGarvey' s teaching 
career covers a span of more than 
40 years, which was interrupted in 
1908 when he was appointed superior 
of the Passionist community in Bos- 
ton. Subsequently, he served as rec- 
tor of St. Ann's Monastery, Scranton, 
and later as Vicar of St. Gabriel's 
Monastery, Boston. 

In 1928, he was appointed Prefect 
of Studies for the Province, a posi- 
tion he has since held except for three 
years when elected Provincial Con- 
suitor in 1929. 

Born Jan. 26, 1874, in New York 
City, the son of the late Francis 
and Susan McCafferty McGarvey, 
he joined the Passionist Fathers in 
1889 in Dunkirk, N. Y. He was 
professed July 17, 1891, at St. PauPs 
Monastery, Pittsburgh, and after 



212 



studies at Passionist monasteries of 
the Eastern and Western Provinces, 
was ordained June 4, 1898, in the 
Newark Cathedral by the late Bish- 
op Winard M. Wigger. Five years 
later he was transferred to Chicago 
as a member of the Mission Band 
of the first Passionist community to 
be established in that city. At the 
turn of the century, he was director 
of studies at St. Mary's Monastery, 
Dunkirk, and served in the same 
capacity in Union City for two years. 
Father McGarvey marked the gold- 
en jubilee of his ordination three 
years ago at public ceremonies at- 
tended by his brother and sister — 
Rev. Henry McGarvey, S.J., well- 
known Jesuit educator of Fordham 
University, and Sister M. Gabriel, 
of the Sisters of Charity, Mount St. 
Vincent's-on-Hudson, N. Y." 
(The Brooklyn Tablet, July 21, 1951) 



Recently the Very Rev. Fr. Prov- 
incial sent out the following informa- 
tion to the houses of our province. 

"I wish to call the attention of all 
the members of this Province to the 
recent recognition received by "The 
Sign," namely the annual award of 
the Catholic Press Association for 
the best Catholic magazine of gen- 
eral circulation, and also three 
other awards. At the same time I 
think it should be made known that 
"The Sign" magazine is a major 
source of income for this Province, 
particularly our home and foreign 
missions. For these reasons the mem- 
bers of "The Sign" staff deserve our 
gratitude and cooperation." (Letter 
of May 23rd, 1951) 

The New York Catholic News tells 



the story of these awards on page 
two of its issue for May 26th. The 
occasion was the convention of the 
CPA held in New York City. Fr. 
David Bullman, C.P., of The Sign 
staff was chairman of the literary 
awards committe. The Sign received 
the award for the best fiction, pre- 
cisely for the 'story, "Hands of the 
Master," and also the award for 
the best illustration, contributed by 
Henry S. Hartman and published in 
the issue of February 1951. 

On June 3 last occurred one of the 
biggest events which can figure in 
the history of a religious institute, 
for on that day was held the formal 
opening and dedication of our grand 
new Holy Family Monastery and 
Retreat House at Farmington, Conn. 
Given here for the record is the good 
story on this event which appeared 
in the June 9th issue of the New 
York Catholic News. 

"Patriotic, civic and religious lead- 
ers attended the dedication of the 
new Holy Family Passionist Mon- 
astery and Retreat House at color- 
ful outdoor ceremonies at 4 p.m., 
Sunday, June 3. 

The Most Rev. Henry J. O'Brien, 
Bishop of Hartford, blessed the mon- 
astery and retreat house, and pon- 
tificated at Solemn Benediction of 
the Most Blessed Sacrament in the 
picturesque monastery gardens. Pas- 
sionist Provincial Ernest Welch wel- 
comed the gathered throng, and in- 
troduced Bishop O'Brien. 

Among those at the ceremonies 
were national, state and city of- 
ficials; priests and monsignori of 
the Hartford Diocese; Provincials 
and superiors of Passionist monas- 



213 



teries throughout the United States; 
representatives of religious commun- 
ities, and members of the Holy Fam- 
ily Laymen's Retreat League. Church 
dignitaries included Archbishop Paul 
Yu-Pin, of China, where some 20 
Passionist Fathers of the Diocese 
of Yuanling are now in "protective 
custody" behind the Iron Curtain. 

Dedication of the $2,000,000 Pas- 
sionist monastery and retreat house 
took 21 months to complete, took 
place on the same day as the beati- 
fication in Rome of Pope Pius X, 
champion of the laymen's retreat 
movement as one of the greatest 
instruments in the "Restoration of 
All Things in Christ." Recognized 
throughout the United States for 
this activity, the Passionist Fathers 
were commended by the present Pope 



Pius XII for their outstanding worl 
in promoting the laymen's retrea 
movement. It was a Passionist who 
served as chairman of the first na- 
tional convention of the Laymen's 
Retreat League and later organized 
the parish unit system which was 
adopted throughout the country. 

The dedication highlighted a four- 
day celebration which began with 
open house for retreatants and their 
families, and continued until the 
dedication ceremonies. On Monday, 
rectors of Passionist monasteries 
were guests of the community at a 
dinner in the monastery. Open house 
for clergy of the Hartford Diocese 
was held Tuesday, with dinner at 
5 p.m. in the retreat house dining 
room. 

Ceremonies Sunday began with 




The new Holy Family Retreat House (left) and Monastery, located at 
Farmington, Connecticut. Dedication ceremonies took place June 3, 1951. . 



214 



a procession from the retreat house 
to the outdoor altar erected in front 
of the monastery entrance where a 
large cross towered high in the sky 
as though suspended from mid-air. 
In the procession led by cross bear- 
er and acolytes were religious and 
secular priests, monsignori, and Bish- 
op O'Brien. The Papal Colors and the 
American flag stood sentinel-like on 
each side of the altar decorated with 
multi-colored Spring flowers. 

Holy Family Monastery and Re- 
treat House nestles peacefully atop 
a secluded knoll on a 70-acre tract 
of wooded land formerly known as 
the old Colt Estate. The monastery 
contains 60 rooms and a public chapel 
with a seating capacity of 250. The 
retreat house has 100 private rooms. 
The buildings were designed by Pro- 
vost & Wright of Boston, and erect- 
ed by the Gilvane Construction Co. 
of Province, R. I. 

The community comprising 18 
priests, 6 Brothers (and a class of 
students to come) follow the Passion- 
ist life which embraces the finest 
features of the traditional monastic 
observance of the Divine Office, to- 
gether with the active apostolate of 
preaching parish missions and re- 
treats to priests and religious com- 
munities. 

Members of the community are 
Fathers Purdon, C.P., rector; Le- 
ander Delli Veneri.C.P., vicar; Leo- 
pold Snyder, C.P. Sylvester Grace, 
C.P., Paulinus Hughes, C.P., Caspar 
Conley, C.P., Conran Kane, C.P., 
Austin Busby, C.P., Philip Ryan, C.P., 
retreat master; Joseph Leo Flynn, 
C.P., retreat director; Vincent Durkin, 
C.P., Raymond Houlahan, C.P., Dan- 



iel Hunt, C.P., Alphonsus Grande, 
C.P., Bernard Tierney, C.P., Leonard 
Amrhein, C.P., director of Brothers; 
Jordan Loiselle, C.P., and Kenan 
Carey, C.P. Also Brothers Dennis, 
C.P., Christopher, C.P., Henry, C.P., 
Francis, C.P., Xavier, C.P., and Cy- 
prian, C.P. 

The monastery and retreat house 
are joined by a private chapel whose 
tower is decorated by a 30-foot il- 
luminated cross of glass block which 
can be seen at night at far as Spring- 
field. The stained windows of the 
chapel depict the 14 Stations of the 
Cross. 

Holy Family Laymen's Retreat 
League of which Albert A. Rochon, 
of New London, is president numbers 
4,500 retreatants. To date, 15-week- 
end retreats have been held since 
Feb. 1, with 27 others scheduled for 
the remainder of the year. The Rev. 
Joseph Leo Flynn, C.P., is retreat 
director. 

The Passionist Congregation, 
founded by St. Paul of the Cross 
in 1741, numbers some 4,000 priests, 
students and Brothers living in 165 
monasteries throughout the world. 
The eastern U. S. Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross, is the largest in 
the world, with nearly 600 Passion- 
ists." 



Within two months after the sud- 
den death of Fr. Charles Gaskin, 
the community of St. Joseph's in Bal- 
timore lost another member in the 
equally sudden death of Fr. Henry 
Codyer. As in the case of Fr. Charles, 
Fr. Henry had had timely warning 
in the sense that he had been ill 
but at the time of his death seemed 



215 



well on the way to recovery. His 
death occurred on Sunday night, 
June 24th, after a heart attack of 
only a few minutes duration. The 
following obituary was printed on 
June 25th in The Sun of Baltimore, 
Md. 

"The Rev. Henry Codyer, of the 
Congregation of the Passion . . ., died 
last night of a heart attack at St. 
Joseph's Passionist Monastery, Old 
Frederick Road and Monastery 
Avenue. — Father Codyer had his first 
attack two months ago and was ad- 
mitted to St. Agnes Hospital. He 
was released after two weeks and 
permitted to perform light duties at 
the Monastery. — For the last four 
years he had been a member of St. 
Joseph's mission band which con- 
ducts religious retreats and missions. 
— During his seventeen years as a 
priest, Father Codyer served at vari- 
ous Passionist monasteries and was 
assistant superior for several years 
of St. Mary's Monastery in Dunkirk, 
N. Y. — Father Codyer was born on 
August 1, 1908, in Waltham, Mass. 
He attended local schools and after 
one year's novitiate at Our Lady of 
Sorrows Monastery, Springfield, 
Mass., took his vows as a religious 
in the Passionist Order. — He com- 
pleted his theological studies six years 
later and was ordained a priest on 
April 28, 1934, at St. Ann's Monas- 
tery, Scranton, Penna. — F u n e r a 1 
services will be held at 9 A.M. to- 
morrow at St. Joseph's Monastery 
with a solemn high requiem mass. 
The body will be sent to Brighton, 
Mass., for burial in the Order's ceme- 
tery at St. Gabriel's Monastery " 



The offiicial obituary of Fr. Henry 
gives the following appraisal of his 
religious and priestly character. 

"After the completion of (his) as- 
signment (as Vice-Rector) he was 
engaged exclusively in the preaching 
of missions and retreats, a work 
which he dearly loved. He was pro- 
foundly conscious of the sacredness 
and the dignity of this great work 
of the Congregation, and he worked 
assiduously and zealously to render 
himself a fit instrument of God's 
grace in the dispensation of the 
riches of the Passion of Christ. — In 
his simplicity, Father Henry was not 
concerned whether his talents were 
ordinary or extraordinary; he was 
just determined to use all the gifts 
which God had entrusted him to the 
utmost of his ability. . . Father Henry 
had a deep realization that the priest 
remains always what Cardinal 
Suhard has called the "Sacramentum 
Christi". That is, not only when ex- 
ercising his priestly functions, but 
in his personal life and his very be- 
ing he ought to be a living symbol 
of the holiness of Christ. Earnestly 
he sought to live his priesthood to 
the utmost of his ability. He was 
keenly conscious of his faults and 
shortcomings, and he regretted them 
deeply. But that awareness humbled 
him and taught him, like St. Paul, 
"To glory in his infirmities that the 
Power of Christ might be made mani- 
fest". — Father Henry lived the life 
of a good Passionist. There was 
nothing dramatic in his makeup and 
nothing that would draw unusual 
attention to him. But he was what 
every Passionist wants to be — "a 
good community man." It requires 



216 



more than ordinary strength of will 
to fit oneself into the routine pat- 
tern of Passionist life without allow- 
ing it to become mere routine. Never 
was the daily pattern of the Passion- 
ist life mere routine to him. It was 
a dedicated privilege which he em- 
braced as a practical means of mani- 
festing his love for the Passion of 
Christ. St. Thomas tells us that 
devotion is "promptitude in the ser- 
vice of God". By that prosaic test 
of constancy Father Henry was a 
sincerely devout man. He did what 
was given him to do, earnestly, hum- 
bly, sincerely. 

"Zeal for souls was a prominent 
feature in his priestly character. If 
he felt that he could give comfort 
or help to a soul, no effort was too 
great. He attracted troubled hearts 
to himself by his innate goodness, 
understanding, and compassion and 
he had the gift of gently imparting 
to them the peace and courage of 
Christ. He had done a considerable 
amount of work for the Sisters of 
the Good Shepherd, and he often 
quoted the axiom of St. Euphrasia 
Pelletier: "As soul is of more value 

than the world" Fulsome and 

lengthy pages might be written, but 
they could add nothing to an epitaph 
that is a tribute of immortal nobility 
— he was a good Passionist and a 
good priest. There is no greater 
goal in life. May he rest in peace." 



As we go to Press, we have re- 
ceived the notice of the death of 
Brother Gabriel (Kelly), C.P. Broth- 
ed died at St. Paul's Retreat, Pitts- 
burgh, August 5th. 



Passionist Nuns 

St. Gabriel's Convent, at Scranton, 
Pennsylvania, celebrated its Silver 
Jubilee on July 2. It was on the feast 
of the Visitation, 1926, that the first 
Holy Sacrifice of the Mass was of- 
fered at St. Gabriel's Convent by 
Rev. Fr. Bernardine Dusch, C.P., 
who had accompanied the first Nuns 
from Pittsburgh. 

The Silver Jubilee was solemnized 
with a Pontifical High Mass of 
Thanksgiving. As the invited clergy 
and religious assembled in the public 
chapel, they admired the tastefully 
decorated sanctuary, its beautiful 
altar banked by large gold vases of 
white snapdragons, American Beauty 
roses and silver-sprayed greens. 

At 10:30 exactly, the clergy enter- 
ed the main door of the public chapel 
in procession, while the Nun's choir 
greeted the entrance of the Bishop 
with the triumphant "Ecce Sacerdos 
Magnus" in Gregorian. Bishop 
Klonowsky, Auxiliary of Scranton, 
pontificated. He was assisted by 
Rev. Fr. Hubert Arliss, C.P., Rec- 
tor of St. Ann's, Assistant Priest; 
Rev. Fr. Michael Connor, C.P., Vicar 
of St. Ann's, as Deacon; Rev. Fr. 
Michael Quinn, Pastor of Christ the 
King Parish, Subdeacon. Father 
John was Pontifical Master of Cere- 
monies and Rev. Fr. Regis Mulligan, 
C.P., Master of Ceremonies of the 
Mass. Among the distinguished vis- 
itors present in the Sanctuary were 
the Very Rev. Fathers Provincial 
of the Eastern and Western Prov- 
inces, Msgr. William K. Dolan and 
Msgr. Salvatore Florey. 

After his Excellency vested, the 
Mass began. The choir sang the 



217 



proper of the Mass in Gregorian, 
the sixth Credo, and the "Mass of 
the Shepherds," by Pietro Yon, writ- 
ten in the style of the Alpine singers. 
The supplementary Offertory was 
excellently done — "Jubilate Deo" — in 
three parts, by L. Albinger. 

After the conclusion of the Mass, 
His Excellency said a few words to 
the congregation about the founda- 
tion and history of the Passionist 
Nuns and their office of prayer and 
penance. This was followed by a 
Te Deum by the Nuns, in thanks- 
giving for the graces of 25 years. 

That evening, at 7:45, Msgr. Vaughn 
preached to an invited Congrega- 
tion of laity, followed by Pontifical 



Benediction, by Bishop Klonowsky. 
He was assisted by the Rev. George 
Jeffrey, Deacon, and Rev. Fr. Alfred 
Weaver, C.P.,Subdeacon. 

On July 3, at 9 A.M., there was 
a Solemn High Requiem Mass for 
deceased religious and benefactors. 
It was sung by Very Rev. Fr. Ernest 
Welch, C.P., Provincial of St. Paul 
of the Cross Province. Fr. Edward 
Gerrity acted as Deacon, while Very 
Rev. Fr. Canisius Hazlitt, C.P. Con- 
suitor, was the Subdeacon. 

The Silver Jubilee celebration was 
a blessed, happy occasion — a fitting 
climax to 25 years hid with Christ 
in God. May God continue to bless 
His work. 



PROVINCES ABROAD 




Sts. John and Paul before the work of reconstruction and 
renovation. 



218 



Sts. John and Paul 

The Basilica of Sts. John and Paul 
was the scene, on June 11, 1951, of 
the Consecration of His Excellency, 
Most Rev. Fulton J. Sheen, D.D. as 
Titular Bishop of Caesariana, and 
Auxiliary to the Cardinal Archbishop 
of New York. It was a happy event 
for the Passionists to he thus point- 
ed out in connection with someone 
so well-known and famous, both in 
this country and abroad. The Con- 
secrator of His Excellency was His 
Eminence Adeodato Cardinal Piazza, 
O.C.D., Secretary of the Sacred Con- 
sistorial Congregation. Co-Consecra- 
tors were His Excellency, Leone 
Giovanni Battista Nigris, Titular 
Archbishop of Filippi and Secretary 
General of the Pontifical Office of 



the Propagation of the Faith, and 
His Excellency, Martin John O'Con- 
nor, Titular Bishop of Tespia and 
Rector of the North American Col- 
lege. 



On the occasion of Bishop Sheen's 
Consecration, a small folder — a tri- 
bute to Cardinal Spellman — describ- 
ing the recent work of restoration 
that has taken place at Sts. John 
and Paul, was published by the 
Architect, Enrico Galeazzi. The two 
pictures, showing the Basilica and 
Campanile both before and after the 
work of restoration, are given here. 
The more recent picture shows clear- 
ly the great amount of work already 
completed. The tower at the time 
was still in the process of restoration. 




The Basilica and Campanile at their present stage of renovation. 

219 



The domus presbyteri cardinalis be- 
tween the Basilica and the Campa- 
nile, has been restored to the origi- 
nal form it possessed from the 11th 
to the 15th Centuries. The odd- 
shaped window distinguishes the 
room where Our Holy Founder was 
accustomed to say Mass. Close 
study of the two pictures will reveal 
a number of other restorations. 



West Central Italy 

The Provincial Chapter of the 
Roman Sicilian Province, the Presen- 
tation of our Blessed Mother, was 
held at Scala Santa, Rome, during 
the month of May. The elections 
resulted in the choice of Very Rev. 
Fr. Luigi of the Sorrowful Virgin, as 
Provincial. His Consul tors are Very 
Rev. Fr. Basilio of the Immaculate, 
and Pietro of the Sorrowful Virgin. 
Very Rev. Fr. Mauro of the Immac- 
ulate was made Consultor ad honor- 
em. Very Rev. Fr. Alfredo of St. 
Joseph was confirmed as Provincial 
Delegate for Sicily. 



The Province of the Presentation 
of the Blessed Virgin Mary has re- 
ceived permission to make a founda- 
tion at Agazzi, in the Diocese of 
Arezzo. This much we learn from the 
Acta Congregationis, which also in- 
dicates that Rescript of the Sacred 
Congregation of Religious, granting 
the permission, was dated January 
12, 1951, and was put into execution, 
by delegation of Most Rev. Fr. Gener- 
al, by Most Rev. Fr. Titus, of St. Paul 
of the Cross, General ad honorem 
and Second General Consultor, on 
January 20. 



North Italy 

During the Provincial Chapter of 
the Province of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary, word came that the 
Province's Mission in Tanganyika 
had been raised to a Vicariate Apos- 
tolic. This Mission was founded in 
1933, the Holy Year in commemora- 
tion of our Redemption, and was 
placed under the patronage of St. 
Gemma. It embraces a large terri- 
tory, and has a population more or 
less primitive, although there are a 
number of Europeans living there, 
among whom the English and Polish 
predominate. 

Naturally the good news gave way 
to a great deal of anticipation and 
speculation regarding the new Vicar 
Apostolic. The news was not long 
in coming from the Holy See. On 
May 27, the day after the closing of 
the Chapter, the announcement was 
made that Very Rev. Fr. Jeremias, 
C.P., former Provincial for two 
terms, and the newly-elected First 
Consultor, had been chosen for that 
high dignity and responsibile posi- 
tion. It was a great honor and at the 
same time a great loss for the Prov- 
ince, for Fr. Jeremias' abilities were 
known throughout the Congregation. 

Holy Cross Province takes this 
occasion to congraulate the new 
Vicar Apostolic of Dodoma. 

Fr. Jeremias, now known as Msgr. 
Antonio Jeremia Pesce, Titular Bis- 
hop of Cesarea in Bythinia, and 
Vicar Apostolic of Dodoma, in Tan- 
ganyika, received his episcopal con- 
secration at Urgnano, Bergamo, on 
July 15th. 

The Province of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary held its Provincial 



220 



Chapter from May 21 to 26. Most 
Reverend Father General, Albert of 
the Sorrowful Virgin, presided over 
the Chapter. Very Rev. Fr. Biagio, 
C.P., was elected Provincial to suc- 
ceed Very Rev. Fr. Jeremias, who was 
elected First Consultor. Very Rev. 
Fr. Raymond was chosen Second 
Consultor. 

Since then, Very Rev. Fr. Jeremias 
has been chosen as Vicar Apostolic 
of Tanganyika, a post of great re- 
sponsibility to which he brings out- 
standing talents and ability. Conse- 
quent upon his appointment as Vicar 
Apostolic, Fr. Raymond succeeded 
him as First Consultor, and the va- 
cant post of Second Consultor was 
filled by the election of Very Rev. 
Fr. Primo, C.P. 



Holy Founder at S. Zenone degli 
Ezzelini, in the Retreat of St. 
Gabriel. 



The new edition of "The Spirit of 
St. Paul of the Cross," by St. Vincent 
Mary Strambi, that appeared during 
the Holy Year, is the work of Rev. 
Fr. Dismas, C.P., of the Province of 
the Heart of Mary. The work is 
substantially a reprint of the second 
volume of the Life of our Holy 
Founder by St. Vincent Mary, with 
certain parts taken from the first 
volume and the addition of quota- 
tions from the Processes and Let- 
ters. The first edition of 3,000 copies 
has already been exhausted, and 
there is another edition anticipated, 
which will carry further notes and 
explanations missing in the first edi- 
tion. The book, it is said, has done a 
world of good, coming as a revelation 
to many. So spoke Msgr. Filippin, 
Founder of the college at nearby 
Paderno del Groppa, who sang the 
solemn Mass for the Feast of our 



Speaking of books, there has also 
been a new edition of the work of 
Fr. Luigi Teresa of Jesus Agonizing, 
C.P., "The Operation of the Holy 
Spirit in Jesus Christ, in the Church 
and in Souls." Fr. Severino of St. 
Joseph, C.P., is the person behind 
this publication, which he translated 
from the second French edition. Fr. 
Severino is one of the young priests 
destined for the African Missions. 
His work is of such merit that it 
may not be passed over. 



This year marks the Golden Jubilee 
of Profession of Very Rev. Fr. 
Biagio, Consultor, who in the recent 
Chapter was elected Provincial, and 
his classmate, Fr. Bernardine, C.P. 
This year, in fact, has been another 
outstanding year for the Province, 
noting also the Golden Jugilee (of 
Ordination) of Bishop G. B. Peruzzo, 
C.P., Bishop of Argrigento (Sicily), 
who is from this Province, and who, 
together with the other jubilarians, 
solemnized the occasion at Caravate. 



The September, 1950 issue of The 
Passionist carried an account of the 
Calvary group that had been erect- 
ed by the Students of S. Zenone 
degli Ezzelini during Holy Week. 
The same was done again this year, 
with better results and far greater 
publicity. The local paper "II Gaz- 
zettino," for April 24, carried, in 
part, the following account: "On 
March 17, in the church dedicated 
to the young Passionist Saint, Ga- 



221 



briel of the Sorrowful Virgin, a 
representation of the Mystery of Re- 
demption was opened to the public. 
About twenty-five changes of scene 
invite the spectator, with the aid of 
luminous signs, to meditate on the 
principal steps of the Passion. 

"From the sunset of Holy Thurs- 
day, with it's illuminated Cenacle, 
one passes to Gethsemani where one 
comes upon the projected scene of 
Jesus in prayer by Gustave Dore. 
As this picture fades away, another 
appears showing Jesus bound with 
ropes at the gates of the city of Jeru- 
salem, then suddenly the palace of 
the Sanhedrin lights up, then entire 
Jerusalem with the terraces and 
streets crowded with curious onlook- 



ers, watching Jesus led from one 
to another of the tribunals. Morning 
of Good Friday comes and the bright 
afternoon light shows Jesus on the 
Cross between two crucified thieves. 
Dense shadows then swallow the 
scene, leaving only the Saviour in 
light. . . . 

"The faithful came by the thou- 
sands, individuals and groups, from 
nearby and from great distances, 
on foot, by bicycle and train, surg- 
ing up the beautiful hill of St. Ga- 
briel's, dominated by the Monastery 
of the Passionist Fathers. 

"This beautiful work of molding 
was originated and realized by the 
Passionist theological students." 

The Calvary group was placed in 




View of the "Calvary Group" constructed by the Students at S. Zenone 
degli Ezzelini, in the Province of the Immaculate Heart of Mary. 



222 



a room off the vestibule of the 
Church, where it was easily accessi- 
ble to all, and might best carry its 
important message to all who saw 
it. Visitor's reactions showed that 
it was a great success. It made a 
great impression on the children; and 
even the adults could be heard ex- 
claiming "It makes you think!" 
After fulfilling its purpose so well, 
it was taken down. Next year, it 
will be better yet. 



Again this year, on Good Friday, 
the Theological Students at S. Zenone 
degli Ezzelini preached at the Solemn 
Public Way of the Cross, speaking 
from the steps of the Church of 
Madonna della Salute, before an 
enormous crowd that covered the 
esplanade crowning the hill of the 
same name, and afterwards in the 
midst of a thousand lights, the pro- 
cession made its way towards the 
Parish Church of S. Zenone degli 
Ezzelini. 



Rev. Fr. Federico, C.P., has been 
entrusted with the preparation of 
an article for the Dictionaire de 
Spiritualite on Venerable Father 
Dominic of the Mother of God. Fr. 
Federico is eminently fitted for this 
assignment, for the work on Vener- 
able Dominic is well-known. Father's 
many occupations have not hindered 
his preparatioon of two articles for 
the Ecclesiastical Encyclopedia, one 
on the Oxford Movement, and the 
other on Cardinal Newman. All this 
is in addition to his work of collab- 
oration, in the Catholic Encyclopedia, 
on the articles listed as follows: 
Cardinal Deschamps, Dominic of the 
Mother of God, Infallibility of the 
Pope and the Church, Magisterium 
of the Church, Cardinal Perraud 
Mastrofini and Cardinal Pie. 



Southern Italy 

During the month of March, the 
Province of the Addolorata convened 
its Provincial Chapter at the Retreat 




Architect's drawing of the new Convent of the Passionist Nuns in the pro- 
cess of construction at Naples, in the Addolorata Province. 



223 



of S. Maria ai Monti, Naples. Most 
Rev. Fr. Albert, C.P., General, pre- 
sided over the Chapter. Very Rev. 
Fr. Phillip of the Holy Family was 
elected Provincial. Very Rev. Frs. 
Joseph of Jesus and Mary and John 
of the Mother of God were chosen as 
his Consultors. 

The Santa Maria, published by the 
Passionist Fathers at the Sanctuary 
of our Lady of Pugliano, at Paliano, 
carried an article in its May, 1951 
issue on the cornerstone laying of 
the new Monastery of the Passionist 
Nuns on the Via S. Giacomo dei 
Capri, at Naples. The cornerstone 
of the new convent was laid and 
blessed by His Eminence Cardinal 
Ascalesi. Formerly there was a con- 



vent of Benedictine Nuns on the spot, 
but it has long since fallen into 
ruins. The new convent of the Pas- 
sionist Nuns will be dedicated to the 
Assumption of Our Lady. It is hoped 
that before many months the new 
convent will be completed for the 
good, deserving Passionist Nuns. 



East Central Italy 

A past issue of The Passionist 
noted the fact that the Province of 
the Pieta was this year celebrating 
the Centenary of its foundation. 
Special ceremonies were held to com- 
memorate the Jubilee, lasting from 
April 22 to the day itself, the 29th. 

During the week preceding the 




This picture, taken during the Centenary Celebration of the Province of 
the Province of the Pieta, shows Most Rev. Fr. General and Most Rev. Fr. 
Procurator (at his left) surrounded by the Provincials of the Provinces of 
Italy. 



224 



event, a special course of sermons 
was delivered, morning and evening, 
to the great crowds of people who 
came to the Retreat. The preacher, 
Rev. Fr. Dismas, C.P., pointed out 
the particular traits of holiness in 
the life of our Holy Founder, and the 
other saintly men whose fame has 
spotlighted the Province of the Pieta 
in the eyes of the world. (Passion- 
ist, June, 1951. p. 148) 

The day of Jubilee was fittingly 
celebrated. Bishop Cossio of Re- 
canati sang the Pontifical Mass, 
which was followed, a short time 
later, by the ceremony of Crowning 
the statue of the "Mater Pietatis," 
the titular of the Province. The 
crown of gold, previously blessed by 
our Holy Father, Pope Pius XII, was 
brought forward on a silver plate by 
one of the four pages of honor, and 
then placed upon the head of the 
Blessed Virgin by Most Rev. Fr. 
Albert, our General, amidst the 
cheers of the throng that jammed 
both the church and the piazza. 

After the Te Deum had been sung, 
Most Rev. Fr. General began the 
solemn Mass, coram episcopo. At 
the Gospel, Very Rev. Fr. Jeremias 
of St. Paul of the Cross, at the time 
Provincial of the Province in Upper 
Italy, recalled the whole glorious 
history of the Province of the Pieta. 

A loudspeaker was installed to 
give everybody a chance to follow the 
unfolding of the various ceremonies. 
The interior of the Church was deco- 
rated by a firm from Macerata. The 
facade was illuminated, and the 
street was hung with colored lights 
for the distance of a kilometer, 
(three-fifths of a mile). A grand 



procession was the feature of the 
evening. The statue of the Blessed 
Virgin was preceded by the Prep 
School boys, the Novices, many of 
the religious of the province, and the 
Superiors of the other Italian Prov- 
inces. Later in the evening, there 
was a fire-works display. 



The Provincial Chapter of the 

Province of the Pieta was held at 
Recanati, from April 30th to June 
7th. The new Curia consists of Very 
Rev. Fr. Remigio, C.P., Provincial; 
Very Rev. Fr. Mario, First Consult- 
or. The new Provincial was formerly 
Rector of the Retreat of Madonna 
della Stella, the First Consultor was 
Director of Students in the same 
Retreat, while the Second Consultor 
was previously Rector in the Retreat 
at Morrovale. 

Among the more important de- 
cisions of the Chapter was the decree 
to combine the two Prep Schools of 
the Province into one, so that all 
the aspirants, in both grade and high 
school, will be in one place. 



The Holy Year seems to have been 
a milestone in the history of the 
Sanctuary of St. Gabriel, at Isola 
del Gran Sasso in the Province of 
the Pieta. Towards the end of No- 
vember 28, 1950, some frescoes were 
accidentally uncovered in one of the 
wings of the ancient Monastery. 

On November 28, 1950, one of the 
workers was pulling down an old 
section of plaster in the present ves- 
tibule, and unexpectedly uncovered 
an odd coloring on the wall beneath. 
He went on with the job, when two 
of the religious happened by, and 



225 





IB 



m t 









Another view taken during the Centenary Celebration, showing the Super- 
iors mentioned above, together with the Community at Recanati. 



suspecting something, quickly order- 
ed him to desist, so that they might 
see what was happening. After ex- 
amining the section carefully, the 
thick layer of plaster and glaze was 
slowly removed, until it was pos- 
sible to discern a beautiful fresco 
picturing a Madonna in adoration 
before her Divine Child, resting in 
the arms of a St. Francis or a St. 
Anthony of Padua. 

Spurred on by such unexpected 
treasure, the whole wall was given 
a minute inspection, and when indica- 
tions of other pictures were found, 
the wall was systematically torn a- 
way. A few hours later, they had 
uncovered, at least part of six other 
frescoes, in a classical style and 
much larger than the first. When 
unexpected difficulty confronted their 
progress, it was agreed to put off 
the rest of the work until later, 
and to notify the Superintendent of 
Art, to pbtain the service of an ex- 



pert. In the meantime, the frescoes 
were judged to go back to about 
the 15th Century. Upon his arrival, 
the expert ascribed the first fresco 
to the 16th Century, and confirmed 
the fact that the other dated from 
the 15th, although there was some 
evidence that they might go back 
to the last years of the 14th Century, 
coinciding with the discovery of 
America! 



France ' 

It was a pleasure to read in the 
pages of the "Revue de la Passion," 
published by the Fathers of St. 
Michael's Province, the story of the 
founding of the St. John Bosco Vo- 
cational Clubs, "another original 
idea from America, whose realization 
has brought magnificient results.' 
"Les freres, P. Henri et P. Mathieu 
Vetter, C.P.," according to the arti- 
cle, which is reprinted from Bulletin 



226 



Salesien, were the guiding hands 
behind the Vocational Clubs, and 
it has repaid their efforts. 



The "Revue" also carries an ex- 
cellent article on Blessed Julien 
Maunoir, S.J., the Jesuit missionary 
whose beatification took place May 
20. This outstanding preacher is 
called "The Apostle of Jesus Suffer- 
ing," and his apostolate among the 
Catholic Britons was most fruitful. 
If possible, we hope to give a little 
more about his life and work. Sure- 
ly, there is much of the edifying in 
this missionary devoted to the Pas- 



Spain 

Earlier this year we were struck 
by pictures in El Laboro published 



by the Fathers of the Holy Family 
Province, of the gigantic Mission 
held simultaneously in Barcelona, 
from February 11 to 25. In response 
to our query, Rev. Fr. Theodore, C.P., 
Editor of El Labaro, has sent us 
some further information about the 
Mission. 

The Mission covered the entire city. 
There were 483 different mission 
centers, worked by 480 missionaries 
in five different tongues. Each center 
held from 3 to 6 different services 
during the day. There was a total 
of 7,000,000 leaflets, etc., printed, be- 
sides 25,000 large colored posters, 
advertising the Mission. 3,800 loud- 
speakers were installed throughout 
the city. There were 80 units 
of motor caravans, for advertising 






*;':• % 



Picture showing several of the Fathers of the Province of the Holy Family 
who participated in the gigantic Mission at Barcelona, Spain. 

227 



purposes. On the "Day of Charity," 
2,000,000 pesetas were distributed to 
those in need. Morning attendance 
was 200,000, while evening attend- 
ance of 450,000 doubled that number. 
40,000 men made the Way of the 
Cross. Children's Holy Communions 
reaching 200,000, adults 800,000. The 
closing ceremonies drew 350,000 peo- 
ple. 

As for the Passionist part of the 
Mission, a total of 10 of our Fathers 
from Holy Family Province took 
part: Frs. Marcial, Gonzalo, Bene- 
dicto, Luis, Basilio, Constantino, 
Manuel, Jose Domingo, Emeteria, 
and Evaristo. They had charge of 
8 different Mission centers. 



The Province of the Holy Family 
held its Provincial Chapter at Zara- 
gosa, beginning April 20. It was pre- 
sided over by Most Rev. Fr. John 
Mary of the Holy Family, General 
Consultor and Prefect of Studies, 
who is a member of the Province 
of the Holy Family. The elections 
resulted in the confirmation in office 
of Very Rev. Fr. Innocent of the 
Patronage of St. Joseph, Provincial. 
The Consultors chosen were Very 
Rev. Fr. Marcial of the Immaculate 
Heart of Mary, and Very Rev. Fr. 
Paulinus of St. Gabriel. 

One of the decrees of the Chapter 
was to increase the suffrages for 
the parents of the religious of the 
Province. In addition to the prescrip- 
tions, of number 297 of the Regula- 
tions, the Province of the Holy Fam- 
ily has always celebrated a Solemn 
Mass in the Retreat in which the 
religious is de familia. The Chapter 
has decreed that now this Solemn 



Mass shall be sung in all the Re- 
treats in the Province. 

Another important decree provides 
greater facilities for the technical 
preparation and formation of the 
Directors of Students and the Lec- 
tors of the Preparatory Seminary. 



Belgium 

From the pages of "Kruis en 
Liefde," published by the Fathers of 
the Province of St. Gabriel, we learn 
that the new Monastery under con- 
struction at Wavre-Ste. Catherine in 
the Diocese of Malines is now under 
roof. Present plans indicate that the 
new Monastery will be opened by 
September 15, the Feast of the Seven 
Dolors, which is also the titular 
feast of the Monastery. 



We in this segment of the Congre- 
gation have heard little indeed about 
Venerable Brother Isidore of St. 
Joseph, C.P. Now the saintly brother 
is coming into his own. October 6, 
1950 saw the opening of the formal 
inquiry into his life and virtues, and 
the miracles attributed to him. This 
beginning of the long road to the 
honors of the altar, as we hope, 
took place under the presidency of 
His Excellency, Bishop Lamiroy of 
Bruges. 

Brother Isidore of St. Joseph, (Isi- 
dore DeLoor) was born at Vracene, 
in East Flanders. His parents main- 
tained a small farm, one which en- 
tailed a lot of hard work and never 
quite managed to make ends meet. 
In this milieu of hard work and 
prayer Isidore grew up. For the De- 
Loor cottage was a house of prayer. 



228 



Before and after meals always, and 
the recitation of the rosary was 
never omitted. 

Brother Isidore remained true to 
his bringing up. All his life, he was 
a hard worker and a man of prayer. 

At the age of 26, Isidore dropped 
a bombshell in the midst of his fam- 
ily when he announced to his parents 
his desire to become a religious. They 
were Christians however, and accept- 
ed God's will. One obstacle stood in 
the way — his brother Franz was in 
line for military service — but that 
was disposed of when Franz was ex- 
empted, and he was left free to fol- 
low his vocation. 

As yet, Isidore had not the slight- 
est idea which order he wished to 
enter. So, when the Redemptorists 
gave a mission nearby, in 1907, Isi- 
dore sought out Fr. Bouckaert, C.S. 
S.R., one of Flander's outstand- 
ing missionaries. The good mission- 
ary advised him to apply to the 
Passionists. "Go to the Passionists," 
he said. "There you will find your 
place, for it is there God wants you. 
I myself will recommend you to the 
Passionist Provincial. . . ." 

In the Spring of 1907 Isidore left 
for the Novitiate at Ere. It was a 
difficult step for him, this separation 
from his family. He never saw his 
home town again. There were plenty 
of tears at the DeLoor home, too, 
those days, but they were not all 
tears of sorrow. Hardship was noth- 
ing new to them. They knew how to 
rise above human love and earthly 
hopes. Fundamentally, it was a joy 
to give one of their own to such an 
exalted service, and, even though 
it hurt, they could say: "If God is 



calling you, my son, go. He honors 
us by choosing you." 

In the Novitiate, Brother Isidore 
of St. Joseph became his new name 
and title, the name he was to bear 
for the nine years yet remaining 
to him. He followed the very ordi- 
nary life of a humble Passionist 
lay-brother. His was a very un- 
complicated life; nevertheless he 
managed to put a great amount of 
love into it. He made the gift of 
himself complete, and never tried 
to take any of it back, often recall- 
ing to himself the words of our 
Blessed Saviour: "No one, having 
put his hand to the plow and look- 
ing back, is fit for the kingdom of 
God." (Luke 9,62) The cloud of insig- 
nificant details that form the warp 
and woof of life he transformed 
into a golden hymn of praise to the 
Most High. His motto was: Be ready 
to serve. Be always ready to serve. 
Be ready to serve the cause of the 
Crucified. 

Naturally crosses were never ab- 
sent. God never spares his friends. 
In 1911 a painful cancer developed 
and Brother Isidore lost his right 
eye. The Doctor's said five or six 
years. The news that he had not 
long to live did not shake him in 
the least. He kept up his smile and 
got back to work. He died five years 
later, October 6, 1916. 

However, Brother Isidore's work 
was not finished. God was pleased 
once again to exalt the humble. Soon 
people were coming to pray at his 
tomb. There was talk of graces be- 
ing granted, of prayers being heard. 
Brother Isidore became far wider 
known in death than during life. 



229 




Brother Caspar, C.P. 

Even now, the Postulator of his 
cause is constantly receiving letters 
of acknowledgement from the most 
unexpected places. 

May God hasten the day that will 
see this humble Passionist lay- 
brother exalted before the whole 
Church. 



Fr. Raymund, C.P. 

Roermond, in which the Retreat of 
Mook is situated. The Passionist 
Missionary Sisters of St. Gemma, as 
previously reported in The Passionist 
(Jan. and March, 1949), were origi- 
nally founded for the purpose of aid- 
ing our Fathers in the Missions. It 
is a distinct pleasure to see the in- 
stitute growing. 



Holland 

The Feast of our Holy Founder, 
April 28, was marked, in the Prov- 
ince of Our Lady of Holy Hope, by 
the vestition of five young ladies in 
the habit of the Passionist Mission- 
ary Sisters of St. Gemma. The cere- 
mony conducted by His Excellency, 
Msgr. G. Lemmens, D.D., Bishop of 



The next day, Sunday, April 29, 
saw the Ordination of seven new 
priests of the Province. The cere- 
mony was performed by Bishop 
Lemmens, and it attracted an enor- 
mous crowd of the laity. Besides 
the usual Sunday crowds, there were 
more than a hundred relatives and 



230 



friends of the Ordinandi present, not 
to mention the members of the two 
Communities at Mook, and the one 
at Nijmegen, which is the hospice 
for the Universitarians. 

The following day saw the seven 
young priests offer their first Masses, 
in the Passionist Church at Mook, 
all at the same time. Upon the con- 
clusion of their first Masses, they 
were seated in the Sacristy where 
their hands were kissed by each 
member of the Community and their 
closest relatives. 

His Excellency, Msgr. Lemmens is 
a staunch friend of the Passionists. 
He has shown this on countless 
occasions. The Bishop wears a pas- 
sionist "Sign" beneath his episcopal 
robes. 



June 22 saw the departure of two 
religious of the Province for the 
Missions in Borneo. They were Fr. 
Raymund de Groot and Brother Cas- 
par Van der Schueren, who left 
Amsterdam on His Majesty's ship, 
the Orange. Father Raymund took 
special courses at the Capuchin Col- 
lege in Tilburg, and followed them up 
with a Medical Course at Rotterdam. 
Brother Caspar has been given the 
job of erecting an industrial school, 
in which he will be the instructor. 
He has just completed a three-years' 
course in carpentry and blacksmith- 
ing at one of the most famous in- 
dustrial schools in Holland. He takes 
with him a considerable number of 
crates and cases of up-to-date ma- 
chinery and hand tools pertinent to 
his craft. His school, of course, exists 




Picture taken during the Ceremony of blessing the new Statue of Our Lady 
of Fatima, showing part of the large crowd in attendance. 



231 




., , 

on paper only. It will be up to him 
to materialize it — out of wood, since 
bricks are unknown in Borneo. Suc- 
cess to both of them! 



Beautiful new statue of Our Lady 
of Fatima which was blessed Pente- 
cost Sunday at our Monastery 
Church, Schwarzenfeld, Germany. 



Germany 

For some months the League of 
Catholic Women of Schwarzenfeld 
had collected funds to buy a statue 
of Our Lady of Fatima. The solemn 
blessing was set for Pentecost eve- 
ning. 

By 7:30 in the evening, a crowd 
never before seen at the Church 
had gathered. The function opened 
with a sermon by Rev. Fr. Frederick, 
C.P., who pointed out the special 
significance of the devotion to Our 
Lady of Fatima. The sermon was 
followed by the solemn blessing, 
which was given by Very Rev. Fr. 
Francis, C.P., Rector of the Retreat 
at Schwarzenfeld. Afterwards he re- 
peated the words of the Consecration 
to the Immaculate Heart of Mary. 
Then the procession, by candle light, 
began to form and made its way 
around the property. Anyone who 
has ever seen our property at 
Schwarzenfeld can imagine the 
length of the procession if we merely 
state that the beginning was already 
half way around the property before 
the end of the procession had left; 
the Church. The beautiful celebra- 
tion concluded with Benediction, and I 
the singing of the Te Deum. 



232 



# 

7™" 



ITEMS flf 



%* 



Bulletin 
Board 



rs r 



% 



Ota; 



ANCE 



Recently Very Rev. Fr. Provincial 
has had the Decrees of the Provincial 
Chapters of Holy Cross Province 
printed for the use and convenience 
of the Brethren of the Province. The 
General Curia also has recently pub- 
lished a collection of those General 
Chapter Decrees that have come into 
force since the last edition of the 
Regulations. These latter we have 
translated for the readers of The 
Passionist on an earlier page of 
this issue. Thus, we are brought up 
to date. 



The Review For Religious, July 
15, 1951, carries an excellent article 
on "Growth in Grace Through the 
Eucharist," by Fr. Anselm Laco- 
mara, C.P., of the Province of St. 
Paul of the Cross. We were also 
struck by an article in the August 
issue of The Sign written by Fr. 
Augustine Paul Hennessy, C.P. It 
is entitled "Pledged to a Cross," and 
ties in the Sacrament of Marriage 
with the Passion of Christ. It should 
be very popular with the readers of 
The Sign. 



The new Holy Family Monastery 
and Laymen's Retreat House at East 
Farmington, Conn., received national 
coverage at the time of its Dedi- 
cation. We even found pictures of 
the new Retreat House in the JuFy 
16th issue of "Spark," a bi-weekly 
news magazine that is crusading 
against sensationalism, immorality 
and irreligion. 

Santa Cruz, the monthly review 
published by the Passionist Fathers 
in Argentina, carried a reprint, in 
its March issue, of Rev. Fr. Henry's 
article "The Passionist in the Mysti- 
cal Body," which appeared in the 
July-September Passionist, 1949. 



Someone recently handed us the 
newspaper text of a sermon by Fr. 
Isidore Dwyer, dated February 20, 
1911. The sermon is a vindication 
of the South American Clergy a- 
gainst the attacks of a certain Rev. 
E. A. Bell of Chicago. The sermon 
is a masterpiece, typical of Fr. Isi- 
dore. If space allows we hope to 
reprint at least part of it sometime 
in the future. 

233 



Of interst to some will be an article 
in the July Review for Religious, 

entitled "Elections and Appoint- 
ments." The author is Rev. Fr. 
Joseph E. Gallen, S.J., Professor of 
Canon Law at Woodstock College. 
The article, among other matters, 
treats of the question of delegates 
to Religious chapters. 



Bound copies of the Passionist 
for 1950 are now available. 



The article "Vexilla Regis" that 
appears in this issue is a reprint 
from "The Passion Review," an an- 
nual publication dedicated to such 
studies on the Passion as this arti- 
cle. It is edited at St. Paul's Re- 
treat, Mt. Argus, Dublin, and shows 
promise of developing into a very 



worthwhile Passionist publication. 
For information, write: The Editor, 
"The Passion Review," St. Paul's 
Retreat, Mt. Argus, Dublin, Ireland. 
Rev. Fr. Cajetan of the Name of 
Mary, C.P., the Belgian Passionist, 
who wrote so many works on the 
life of our Holy Founder, also wrote 
an account of the Passionist Nuns, 
entitled "St. Paul of the Cross and 
the Passionist Nuns," which was pub- 
lished in 1933. In interest which the 
volume evoked spurred him on to 
write a supplement, containing mate- 
rial which the first volume did not 
have. Recently, through the courtesy 
on the Passionist Nuns at St. 
Joseph's Monastery, Owensboro, 
Kentucky, we have received a copy 
of Father Cajetan's later work. If 
space permits, we hope to arrange 
it for insertion in The Passionist. 



AN AVIATOR DEDICATES HIS WINGS TO HIS LADY 

Hail Mary, Mother of God and my Mother, my Queen and my Lady: I lay my 
Wings at your feet, and this day dedicate my Service to you. My flying Wings 
are the distintive emblem of my branch of Service. Today this emblem takes 
on a new meaning and a new distinction,. As a token of my dedication, and a 
gesture of fidelity, I place my Wings at your feet and become a member of your 
Knighthood of the Skies. This day I choose you as my Queen of the Flying 
Corps. Take my Wings and pin them over your Breast. Wear them for me 
until my term of service is over on earth and I come back home to you. You will 
be waiting for me with open arms to take me to your heart and kiss me; and 
while I lay my head on your breast, you will decorate me and call me your Hero. 

I have won my Wings as my Country's approval of my ability. Let me win them 
back from you again as your recognition of my manhood and integrity. Let me 
not tarnish their luster by any passion unworthy of the Immaculate Heart over 
which you will wear them for me. Let me not dull their gleaming brilliance by 
any cowardice to Your Son, my Commander-in-Chief. 

Hail. Lady of my heart! I'll see you "upstairs" in the Sun, standing on the 
Moon and surrounded by stars! 

Hail, Mary! 

Rev. Fr. Hilary, C.P. 



234 



WORKS OF THE MINISTRY 



(The following enumeration does not pretend to be complete. 
January to August inclusive, that have come to our notice.) 



It contains those items, from 







MISSIONS 




4-11 


Crescent City, Calif. 


St. Joseph's 


Jerome 


11-18 


Pacific Grove, Calif. 


St. Angela 


Jerome 




Houston, Texas 


St. Michael 


Emmanuel 


18-25 


San Gabriel, Calif. 


Old Mission 


Basil, Dunstan 




Groves, Texas 


Immac. Conception 


John Aelred 


2-4 


Hemet, Calif. 


O. L. of Valley 


Basil 


4-11 


N. Sacramento, Calif. 


St. Joseph 


Dunstan 


4-18 


Culver City, Calif. 


St. Augustine 


Edward, Ernest 


11-18 


Rio Linda, Calif. 




Dunstan 




Anderson, Calif. 




Basil 




Sacramento, Calif. 


St. Mary 


Jerome 




Riverside, Calif. 




Aidan 




San Ysidro, Calif. 


O.L. of Mt. Carmel 


Philip 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Precious Blood 


Martin 


1-8 


Lowell, Ohio 


Lady of Mercy 


Pascal 




China, Texas 


Lady of Sorrows 


Emmanuel 




Alta Vista, Iowa 


St. Bernard 


Alban 


1-15 


McCloud, Calif. 


St. Joseph 


Edward 


8-15 


Carberry, 111. 


St. Joseph 


Canute 




Delmar, Calif. 


St. James 


Aidan 




Cedar Rapids, Iowa 


St. Ludmilla 


Alban 




Santa Barbara, Calif. 




Philip 




Mansura, La. 


Lady of Prompt Succor 


Flannon 




Cincinnati, Ohio 


St. Philomena 


Lambert 




Pritchard, Ala. 


St. James 


Arnold 




Mooreland, Okla. 


Mission Church 


Bertrand 




Talmadge, Ohio 


Lady of Victory 


Daniel 


8-22 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


St. Aloysius 


Martin, Ernest 


15-22 


Houston, Texas 


St. Joseph 


Emmanuel 




St. Croix, Ind. 


Holy Cross 


Pascal 




Roseville, Calif. 


St. Rose 


Edward 




Marksville, La. 


Holy Ghost 


Flannon 




Warrick, Ohio 


St. George 


Daniel 


15-29 


Buffalo, Okla. 


St. Patrick 


Clarence 


22-29 


Glen Lake, Minn. 


Immac Heart of Mary 


Regis 




Lakeside, Calif. 


Perpetual Help 


Philip 




Hickory Hill, La. 


Mission Church 


Flannon 




Birmingham, Ala. 


St. Elias 


Cornelius 




St. Augustine, 111. 


St. Augustine 


Matthias 




Columbus, Texas 


St. Anthony 


Stanislaus 




Hamilton, Ohio 


St. Mary 


Gilbert, Bartholomew 


22-6 


Bay City, Mich. 


Visitation 


Alban, Roland 




Hasting, Nebr. 


St. Cecilia 


Canute, Ronan 




Durant, Okla. 


2 mission churches 


George 


29-6 


Grand Prairie, T. 


St. Cecilia 


Emmanuel 




Cannelton, Ind. 


St. Michael 


Pascal 




Los Angeles, Calif. 


Resurrection 


Edward 




Thomas, Okla. 


Bl. Sacrament 


Clarence 


29-13 


Walters, Okla. 


St. Patrick 


Wilfrid 




Saint Clair Shore, M. 


St. Gertrude 


Justin, Valentine 



235 



MAY 6-9 
6-13 



6-20 



7-20 
13-20 



13-27 

13-3 

20-24 

20-27 

27-3 

27-4 

JUNE 10-17 

JULY 8-22 

22-29 

AUG. 1-15 

12-19 

19-26 

26-2 



Cottonport, La. 
Veseli, Minn. 
Kemmerer, Wyo. 
Mexia, Tex. 
Louisville, Ky. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Lemon Grove, Calif. 
Sour Lake, Tex. 
Big Pines, Wyo. 
Moreauville, La. 
Kewanee, 111. 
Conway, Mo. 
Hugo, Okla. 
Cokeville, Wyo. 
Rice Lake, Wise. 
Bunkie, La. 
Merced, Calif. 
Fennimore, Wise. 
Fort Bridger, Wyo. 
Jefferson, S. Dak. 
Paintsville, Ky. 
Brighton, 111. 
Birmingham, Ala. 
Moorland, la. 
Belmond, la. 
Maple Grove, Mich. 
Hydro, Okla. 
Peosta, la. 



St. Anthony 
Holy Trinity 

St. Mary 
St. Rita 
Maternity 

O. L. of Victory 

O. L. of Sorrows 
St. Joseph 
Sacred Heart 
Immac. Conception 

O. L. of Lourdes 
St. Joseph 

St. Mary 

St. Peter 

St. Michael 

St. Alphonsus 

St. Mark 

O. L. of Good Counsel 

St. Francis 

St. Michael 

Blessed Virgin 

Holy Family 



Stanislaus 

Godfrey 

Aidan 

Bertrand 

Finan, Leo Patrick 

Hilary 

Edward 

Emmanuel 

Aidan 

Stanislaus 

Kilian 

Pascal 

John Aelred 

Aidan 

Valentine 

Stanislaus 

Edward 

Alban 

Aidan 

Alban 

Cornelius 

Julius 

Terence 

Regis 

Alban 

Fidelis, Miles 

George 

Regis 



JAN. 



FEB. 



MAR. 



APR. 



25-29 

28-31 

4-6 

4-7 

4-8 

8-11 

21-24 

25-4 

28-2 

8-30 

19-21 

26-29 

31-5 

2-4 

2-11 

3-6 

4-6 

5-8 

5-11 

6-9 

8-17 

9-14 

10-17 

11-13 

12-14 



Maple Mount, Ky. 
Des Moines, la. 
New Ulm, Minn. 
Des Moines, la. 

Iowa City, la. 
Marshaltown, la. 
Sacramento, Calif. 
Woodland, Calif. 
Chicago, 111. 
Des Moines, la. 
Columbus, Ohio 
Chicago, 111. 
Marion, Ohio 
Council Bluffs, la. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Mt. Clemens, Mich. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Rock Island, 111. 
Davenport, la. 
Wichita, Kans. 
Cincinnati, Ohio 
LaCross, Wise. 
Des Moines, la. 



RETREATS 

Academy 
Mercy Hosp. (N) 
Holy Trinity 
Mercy Hosp. (N) 

Mercy Hosp. (N) 
Mercy Hosp. (N) 
St. Joseph Academy 
Academy 

St. Patrick Academy 
Dowling High 
Sacred Heart Comm. 
Nurses Retreat 
St. Mary 

St. Bernard Hosp. 
St. Vincent (N) 
Mercy High 
St. Joseph (N) 
St. Anthony Hosp. 
Villa de Chantal 
Mercy Hospital 
St. Joseph (N) 
St. Clare Convent 
Aquinas High 
Drumm Home 



Finan 

Columban 

Matthew 

Ronan 

Dunstan 

Columban 

Columban 

Kenny 

Damian 

Godfrey 

Matthew 

Lambert 

Godfrey 

Bartholomew 

Alexis 

Anthony 

Howard 

Valentine 

Boniface 

Godfrey 

Matthias 

Anthony 

Kevin 

Howard, Godfrey, Keith 

Regis 



236 



15-17 
15-23 
17-26 

23-4 
MAY 1-3 
1-5 
1-10 
3-12 
5-9 
6-8 
6-15 
7-16 
8-11 
9-13 
16-20 
20-24 
20-29 
20-27 
24-31 
25-1 
25-2 
25-3 
27-3 
28-6 
29-2 
29-7 

31-3 
JUNE 1-10 

3-7 



3-10 



Michigan City, Ind. 
Milbank, S. Dak. 
Hutchinson, Kans. 
Joplin, Mo. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Normandy Mo. 
Chicago, 111 
San Antonio, Texas 
Mt. St. Joseph, O. 
Detroit, Mich. 
San Diego, Calif. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Evansville, Ind. 
Normandy, Mo. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Des Moines. la. 



High School 
St. Bernard Hosp. 
St. Elizabeth Hosp. 
St. John Hosp. 

St. Francis Home 

Cenacle 

Santa Rose Hosp. 

Srs. of Charity 

Laymen 
O. L. of Peace 
Good Shepherd 
Little Sisters 
Immaculate Heart 
Little Sisters 
Little Sisters 
Mercy Hospital 



Port Washington, Wis.St. Alphonsus Hosp. 



Cincinnati, O. 
Brownville, Tex. 
Okla. City, Okla. 
Vicksburg, Miss. 
Corpus Christi, Tex. 
Cleveland, O. 
Van Nuys, Calif. 
Fort Scott, Kan. 
Hot Springs, Ark. 
Chicago, 111 
Okla. City, Okla. 
Kansas City, Mo. 
Toledo, O. 
Corpus Christi, Tex. 
Moreauville, La. 
Wichita, Kan. 



3-11 


Kent, Wash. 


3-12 


Des Moines, la. 


4-8 


Cincinnati, O. 


4-7 


Signal Mountain, 


4-13 


Amarillo, Tex. 


5-9 


Peoria, 111. 


6-15 


Fort Worth, Tex 


7-14 


Bardstown, Ky. 


8-17 


Knoxville, Tenn. 


9-15 


Normandy, Mo. 


9-16 


Glendale, O. 




Peoria, 111. 


9-18 


Winona, Minn. 


10-15 


Chicago, 111. 




Glen Ellyn, 111. 


10-17 


Cleveland, O. 




Lake wood, O. 




Louisville, Ky. 


10-19 


Chicago, 111. 


11-14 


Duluth, Minn. 



St. Clare 

Incarn. Word Academy 
Villa Teresa 
St. Francis Academy 
Incarn. Word Academy 
Franciscans Nuns 
Laymen 
Mercy Hospital 
St. Joseph Hosp. 
Cenacle 
Mt. St. Mary 
St. Agnes Convent 
Little Sisters 
Clergy 

O. L. of Sorrows 
Mt. St. Mary 
Brisco Mem. School 
Bishop Drumm Home 
Franciscan Fathers 
.Clergy 

St. Anthony Hosp. 
Immac. Conception 
St. Joseph Hosp. 
St. Joseph Hosp. 
St. Mary Hosp. 
Mt. Providence 
Glenmary Sisters 
Immac. Conception 
St. Mary College 
Viatorian Fathers 
Maryknoll Seminary 
St. Joseph Convent 

Srs, of Charity 

St. Agnes Parish 

St. Xavier Coollege 
Clergy 



Leo Patrick 
Hilary 
Anthony 
Paulinus 
Godfrey 
Keith 
Kilian 
Kevin 
Gilbert 
Anthony 
Martin 
Alexis 
Boniface 
Alfred 
Keith 
Egbert 
Egbert 
Matthias 
Robert 
Kevin 
Wilfrid 
George 
Cornelius 
Clarence 
Bernard 
Ernest 
Hilary 
Roland 
Barnabas 
Anthony 
Elmer 
Nilus 
Emmanuel 
Stanislaus 
Ronan 
Justin 
Arnold 
Boniface 
Robert 
Bertrand 
Terence 
Kevin 
Timothy 
Finan 
George 
Bernard 
Paulinus 
Hilary 
Matthew- 
Daniel 

Bid win 

Matthias 

Robert 

Emmanuel 

Pascal 



237 



JULY 



AUG. 



11-15 


Cincinnati, 0. 


Franciscan Fathers 


Boniface 


11-20 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Anne Convent 


Alfred 




Chicago, 111. 


St. Cecilia 


Louis 




Ottawa, 111. 


Marquette, High 


Kenneth 




Chicago, 111. 


St. Patrick Acad. 


Egbert 




Chicago, 111. 


Resurrection 


Roland 


12-21 


La Grange Park, 111. 


Bethlehem Academy 


Ronan 


13-20 


Normandy, Mo. 


St. Vincent's Home 


Marion 


13-21 


Bourbonnais, 111. 


Notre Dame Convent 


Ralph 


14-21 


Silverton, O. 


St. Theresa Home 


Cornelius 




Detroit, Mich. 


Dominican High 


Alexis 


14-23 


Nazareth, Ky. 


Srs. of Charity 


Gilbert 


15-24 


Paris, Tex. 


St. Joseph Hosp. 


Bertrand 


17-22 


Lemont, 111. 


Fournier Institute 


Anthony 


18-22 


Cincinnati, O. 


Franciscan Fathers 


Boniface 


19-28 


Mt. St. Joseph 


Srs. of Charity 


Elmer 


21-29 


Lake wood, O. 


Srs. of Charity 


Emmanuel 


25-29 


Cincinnati, O. 


Franciscan Fathers 


Boniface 




Carey, O. 


Pilgrim House 


Timothy 




Winnipeg, Can. 


Clergy 


Edwin 




Cincinnati, O. 


Little Sisters 


Anthony 


29-1 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Laymen 


Martin 


2-11 


Winnipeg, Can. 


St. Mary Academy 


Edwin 


5-11 


Donaldson, Ind. 


Ancilla Domina 


Lambert 


6-10 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Little Sisters 


Kevin 


6-15 


Traverse City, Mich. 


Carmelite Monastery 


Boniface 


7-15 


Milwaukee, Wise. 


Sch. Srs. of N. D. 


Godfrey 


11-15 


Minneapolis, Minn. 


Little Sisters 


Kevin 


12-15 


Houston, Tex. 


Laywomen's Assoc. 


Conleth 


13-22 


Wickliffe, O. 


Marycrest 


Matthias 




Detroit, Mich. 


Good Shepherd 


Alexis 


15-20 


Colorado, Springs 


El Pomar 


Paulinus 


20-22 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Laymen 


Edward 


21-30 


Little Rock, Ark. 


Mt St. Mary 


Anthony 


26-28 


Alhambra, Calif. 


Laymen 


Reginald 


29-5 


New Orleans, La. 


St. Francis 


Kilian 


29-7 


Cleveland, O. 


Ursuline Academy 


Matthias 


2-9 


Carroll, la. 


St. Angela Acad. 


Germain 


3-5 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


Laymen 


Ernest 


3-9 


St. Paul, Minn. 


Srs. of N. D. 


Alfred 


3-10 


Detroit, Mich. 


Srs, of Xtian Charity 


Mark 


3-12 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Catherine 


Fidelis 


4-11 


Toledo, O. 


Ursuline Convent 


Alexis 




Peoria, 111. 


Immac. Conception 


Cornelius 


5-12 


Wichita, Kans. 


Mt. St. Mary 


Lambert 


6-15 


San Antonio, Tex. 


Alamo Heights 


Kevin 




Webster Grove, Mo. 


St. Joseph Convent 


Anthony 




Fort Smith, Ark. 


St. Anne Academy 


Roland 




Rolling Prarie, Ind. 


St. Joseph Novitiate 


Edwin 




Lafayette, La. 


De La Salle High 


Alban 




Springfield, Mo. 


Visitation 


Ralph 




Kenosha, Wise. 


St. Catherine Hosp. 


Emmanuel 




LaGrange Park, 111. 


Bethlehem Academy 


Arnold 




St. Vincent, Ky. 


St. Vincent 


Robert 




St. Louis, Mo. 


St. Joseph Motherhouse 


Boniface 



238 



Mt. St. Joseph, O. 

Houston, Tex. 

Independence, Kans. 

Brownsville, Tex. 

Melrose Park, 111. 

Marty, S. Dak. 

Santa Fe, N. Mex. 

Louisville, Ky. 

Georgetown, Ky. 
8-14 South Bend, Ind. 
8-15 St. Louis, Mo. 
8-16 Beaverville, 111. 
10-19 San Antonio, Tex. 
12-19 Blue Island, 111. 
13-19 Paola, Kans. 
15-23 Okla. City, Okla. 
17-27 Colorado Springs 
17-25 Milwaukee, Wise. 
19-28 Wickliffe, O. 
20-24 Indianapolis, Ind. 
23-26 Normandy, Mo. 
25-3 Victoria, Tex. 
29-5 Cincinnati, O. 



Srs. of Charity Pascal 

Incarn. Word Academy Bertrand 

Mercy Hospital Gilbert 

Mercy Hospital Ronan 

Scalabrini Novitiate Bernard 

St. Paul Indian Mission Justin 

St. Catherine Mission Matthew 

St. Catherine Convent Cormac 

Visitation Academy Hilary 

St. Mary's Conleth 

St. J. Cantius Sem. Daniel 

Servants of Mary Louis 

Holy Ghost Convent Stanislaus 

Mother of Sorrows Nov. Matthias 

Ursuline Convent Lambert 

Villa Teresa Cornelius 

El Pomar Anthony 

Mt. St. Philip Marion 

Good Shepherd Boniface 

O. L. of Fatima Robert 

Mt. Providence Mark 

Nazareth Convent Stanislaus 

St. Clare Convent Kevin 



FORTY HOURS 



28-30 


Buechel, Ky. 


St. Bartholomew 


Warren 


2-4 


Des Moines, la. 


St. John 


Miles 


4-6 


Henderson, Ky. 


Holy Name 


Warren 


9-11 


Granger, la. 


Assumption 


Paulinus 


16-18 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Augustine 


Columban 


11-1 








18-20 


N. Mankato, Minn. 


Holy Rosary 


Jordan 


9-11 


Granger, la. 


Assumption 


Paulinus 


11-16 


Sleepy Eye, Minn. 


St. Mary 


Matthew 


1-3 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Columba 


Robert 


5-8 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Cajetan 


Kilian 


8-10 


St.Joseph, Ky. 


St. Alphonsus 


Finan 




Bowling Green, Ky. 


St. Joseph 


Warren 




Arkansas City, Kan. 


Sacred Heart 


Leopold 


15-17 


Louisville, Ky. 


St. Theresa 


Robert 




Clofin, Kans. 


Immac. Conception 


Wilfrid 




Independence, Kans. 


St. Andrew 


Alvin 


18-20 


Michigan City, Ind. 


Immac. Conception 


Leo Patrick 


20-22 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Anthony 


Justin 


22-24 


Laguna Beach, Calif. 


St. Catherine 


Aidan 




Chicago, 111. 


St. George 


Keith 


29-1 


Los Angeles, Calif. 


O.L. of Lourdea 


Martin 


1-3 


Des Moines, la. 


St. Anthony 


Justin 


4-6 


Creston, la. 


Immac. Conception 


Miles 


6-8 


Glendale, Calif. 


Holy Family 


Philip 


20-22 


Wexford, la. 


immac. Conception 


Miles 


10-12 


Long Beach, Calif. 




Philip 



239 



NOVENAS AND TRIDUTJMS 



MAY 3-13 


Morrice, Mich. 


St. Mary. 


Mark 


4-14 


Kansas City 


Holy Name 


Terence 


6-14 


San Diego, Calif. 




Martin 


27-31 


Grand Rapids, Mich. 


Little Sisters 


Boniface 


21-29 


Santa Monica, Calif. 




Philip 




Minneapolis, Minn. 


Little Sisters 


Paulinus 


28-1 


St. Louis, Mo. 


Little Sisters 


Louis 


JUNE 3-7 


Brookfield, Mo. 


Immac. Conception 


Terence 


9-17 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Jude Shrine 


Kilian 


JULY 17-26 


Chicago, 111. 


St. Louis of France 


Timothy 




St. Anne, 111. 


St. Anne 


Leo Patrick 


18-26 


Cleveland, O. 


St. Ann 


Emmanuel 




Bay City, Mich. 


St. Joseph 


Fidelis 




W. Covington, Ky. 


St. Ann 


Robert 


21-29 


Santa Monica, Calif. 




Philip 



PRAYER TO MARY ASSUMED 



O Immaculate Virgin Mother of God and Mother of Men, we believe with all 
the fervor of our faith in your triumphal Assumption, both in body and soul,! 
into Heaven, where you are acclaimed as Queen by all the choirs of Angels andi 
all the legions of the Saints; we unite with them to praise and bless the Lord: 
Who has exalted you above all other pure creatures, and to offer you the tri- 
bute of our devotion and our love. We know that your gaze, which on earthl 
watched over the humble and suffering humanity of Jesus, in Heaven is filled: 
with the vision of that humanity glorified, and with the vision of uncreated: 
wisdom, and that the joy of your soul in the direct contemplation of the adorablei 
Trinity causes your heart to throb with overwhelming tenderness ; and we, poor 
sinners, whose body weighs down the flight of the soul, beg you to purify oun 
hearts so that while we remain here below, we may learn to see God and Godi 
alone in the beauties of His creatures. We trust that your merciful eyes may 
deign to glance down upon our struggles and our weaknesses; that youn 
countenance may smile upon our joys and our victories; that you may hear 
the voice of Jesus saying to you of each one of us, as He once said to you of 
His beloved disciple : Behold thy son. And we, who call upon you as our Mother, 
we like John, take you as the guide, strength and consolation of our mortal 
life. We are inspired by the certainty that your eyes, which wept over the earth 
watered by the blood of Jesus, are yet turned toward this world, held in the 
clutch of wars, persecutions, oppression of the just and the weak ; and from the 
shadows of this vale of tears, we seek in your Heavenly assistance and tender 
mercy, comfort for our aching hearts and help in the trials of the Church and 
of our fatherland. We believe, finally, that in the glory where you reigny 
clothed with the sun and crowned with the stars, you are, after Jesus, the joy 
and gladness of all the Angels and of all the Saints; and from this earth, over 
which we tread as pilgrims, comforted by our faith in future resurrection, wc 
look to you, our life, our sweetness and our hope; draw us onward with the 
sweetness of your voice that one day, after our exile, you may show us Jesus 
the Blessed Fruit of your womb, Clement, O Loving, O Sweet Virgin Mary. 

Pope Pius XII 

240 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 

HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, SEPTEMBER 1951 



ROME 


Meinrad 


Flannon 


Alvin 39 


Postulant 


\Ialcolm 1 


Bruce 


Finan 


Brothers 


Brothers 




Berchmans 


Roger 34, 36 


Kenneth 


CHICAGO 


Francis Martin 


John 38 


Bernard 19 




Fames Patrick 2 


Carl Anthony 


Forrest 37 


Conrad 22 


DES MOINES 


*eil 3 


Brothers 


Fergus 10 


Regis 20 


Bernard Mary 5 


roseph 4 


Felix 


Warren 


David 21 


Miles 7 


Uamillus 5 


Gilbert 


Students 




Ignatius 


ECilian 7 


Leo 


Venard 
Caspar 


ST. PAUL 


Justin 


Benedict 


John 


Elmer 5 


Cornelius 


Hyril 
^.urelius 


CINCINNATI 


John Mary 
Peter Claver 


Faustinus 6 
Cormac 7 


Sylvester 
Malachy 


David 


Gilbert 5 


Luke 


Matthew M 


Paulinus 


Augustine 

Tincent 

Norbert 

Uban 

lichard 9 

Matthias 


Egbert 7 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 


Clement 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bede 

Rian 


Hyacinth 

Julian 

Edward 

George 

Christopher 

Urban 


Peter 

Matthew V 34 
Regis 

Ignatius B 30 
Thomas More 31 
Frederick 32 


Jregory Mc 


Angelo 25 


Jude 


Brendan 9 


Keith 


oseph M. 13 


Louis 




Jeremias 
Paschal 
Charles G. 


Columban 


Pius 


Nicholas 15 


Brothers 


Randal 


Llan 35 
Cenneth 


Cyprian F. 9 
Daniel 


Luke 22 


Clyde 
Loran 


Jonell 
3enet 10 
?haddeus 17 


Gabriel 27 


Ronan 




Emmanuel 

Donald 

Howard 


Casimir 20 
Denis 19 


Jordan 10 
Firmian 11 


Students 

Gerard 


Jarnabas M. 36 


Wilfrid 23 


ST. LOUIS 


Brothers 


Peter 


Vm Gail 14 








Michael Jos. 


Jregory Jos 13 


Brothers 


Kyran 5 


Louis 22 


Raphael 


^eo Patrick 


Columban 


Walter 9 


Philip 19 


Benedict 


Paul 


James 


Celestine 40 


Robert 


Theodore 


Jodfrey 


William 


John Philip 


Edwin 


Owen 


'ohn Baptist 12 




Aloysius 


Cletus 


Francis 


Joel 10 


LOUISVILLE 


Herbert 


Kevin 


Casimir 


tene 16 


Gordian 5 


Kevin 


Ambrose 




Jarroll 34 


Bartholomew 7 


Claude 


Andrew Mary 


Brothers 


limon 42 


Adalbert 


Edgar 41 


Stephen 


Romuald 




Charles C. 


Ervan 41 


Vincent 


Thomas 


itudents 


Charles 


Anthony 


Bernard 


George 


Jarry 


Lawrence 


Germain 41 


Leonard 


Charles 


ohn Francis 


Anselm 9 


Cyprian 41 


Gerald 


DETROIT 


r ictor 


Andrew 


William Jos 41 


Louis 


toil 


Thomas 


Emil 41 


Joseph M 


Julius 5 


. Gabriel 


Hubert 


Roch 41, 34 


Philip 


Ralph 7 


lyron 


Marion 


Joel 41 


Bro. Joachim 


David F. 


ten is 


Arnold 


Leon 41 


Bro. Francis 


Alexis 


jBaert 


Robert B. 


Campion 41 


Bro. Leonard 


Gerald 


lUgeile 


Alfred 


Raymond 41 


Bro. Paul 


Linus 



241 



Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Conrad 

Timothy 

Roland 

Valentine 

Fidelis 

Patrick 9 

Colum 

Robert C. 25 

Mel 

Nilus 

Roderick 

Harold 

Declan 

Brothers 

Aloysius 

Theodore 

Justin 



SIERRA ^: 
MADRE 

Herman 5 
Paul Francis 7 
Reginald 
Gabriel 24 
Maurice 26 
Ferdinand 
Martin 
Philip 
Austin 
Eustace 25 
Theophane 
Aidan 
Joyce 17 
Ed. Guido 
Quentin 
Ernest 
Isidore 23 
Stephen Mary 



Sacred 

Eloquence 

Melvin 

Emmett 

Kent 

Michael 

Ward 

Dominic 

Bernardine 

Brothers 

Richard 

Gerald 

Joseph 

BIRMINGHAM 

Canute 8 

Hilary 

Lambert 

Terrence 

Brice 

Bro. Henry 



SACRAMENTO 

Basil 5 
Leo 

Damian 23 
Dunstan 
Henry 
Jerome 25 
Bro. Anthony 
Bro. Patrick 

HOUSTON 

Conleth 8 
Stanislaus 
Bertrand 
Clarence 
John Aelred 
Bro. Daniel 

ENSLEY 

Nathanael 9 
Ludger 



Canisius 
Carl 10 

FAIRFIELD 

Edmund 9 

CHINA 

Anthony Mai 47 
William W. 18 
Cyprian L. 18 
James L. 49 
Francis Fl. 18 
Harold Trav. 18 

CHAPLAINS 

Fabian 43 
Leonard 44 
Xavier 45 
Brian 46 
Cyril M. 48 
Reginald J. 50 
Kenny 51 



REFERENCES 



First General Consultor, SS. Giovanni 29. 

e Paolo, Rome (147), Italy 30. 

Provincial 31. 

I Consultor 32. 

II Consultor 33. 
Rector 34. 
Master of Novices 35. 
Vicar 36. 
Superior 37. 
Pastor 38. 
Assistant Pastor 39. 
Vice Master 40. 
Lector of Church History 41. 
Lector of Dogma 42. 
Chaplain at Dunning 43. 
Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 44. 
Provincial Secretary 

Director of Students 45. 

Catholic Mission, Yuanling, Hunan, 

China 46. 

Cook 

Tailor, Infirmarian 47. 

Refectorian 48. 

Outside Brother 

Retreat Director 49. 

Assistant Retreat Director 50. 

Retreat Master 51. 

Lector of Sacred Eloquence 

Porter 52. 

Lector of History 



University Students 
Lector of English, II Phil. 
Lector of I Phil; Hist, of Phil. 
Lector of III Phil; Apologetics 
All around Brother 
Catholic University 
Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture, Passion 
Lector of Canon Law, Pastoral 
Moral III & IV 
Vice-Director 
Chaplain, St. Vincent's 
Lector 

Vocational Director 
723 5th Ave., Kalispell, Mont. 
Veterans Administration 
P.O. Box 9821, Aspinwall, Pa. 
Catholic Chaplain, U.S. Naval Hospital.' 
Chelsea, Mass. 

Box 21, Navy No. 127, P.M., Seattle, 
Washington. 
Maryknoll House, Stanley, Hong Kong 
HQ. CC B 2 AD, A.P.O. c/o P.M., New 
York, N. Y. 

The Sign, Union City, N.J. 
Sick Leave 
6103 ASU Branch USDB Lompoc, Cal- 
ifornia 

U.S. Naval Traning Center Bainbridge, 
Maryland 



242 



Health, Our Holy Founder 
and Passionist Diet 

(Continued from page 173) 

edge is not an essential require- 
ment. The food classifications listed 
above are concrete enough. All that 
is needed is for one to have a gen- 
eral idea of the ailment necessitat- 
ing a special diet and then prepare 
the foods permitted and withhold 
those which are forbidden. 



ULCER 
DIET. 



AND INTESTINAL 



The Ulcer Diet (or Sippy Diet 
as it is called) offers a low residue 
diet for the simple reason that 
this disorder is aggravated by any 
irritating residual substance which 
comes into direct contact with an 
ulcerated area. An ulcer is a raw, 
open sore (ordinarily in the lining 
of the stomach but often found in 
the duodenum and the small intes- 
tine) caused by one or more factors. 
Such a condition excludes all rough- 
age that would keep the ulcer acti- 
vated, as well as strongly-flavored, 
fried and most fatty foods, because 
their gas- forming and acid produc- 
ing results set up an almost con- 
stant irritating reaction. 

It is evident, therefore, that the 
dietary treatment for this condi- 
tion is confined to soft, mildly- 
flavored and soothing foods. In this 
way, the irritated membrane is 
given a rest, so to speak, during 
which time mother nature gradual- 



ly restores the area to health, as- 
sisted by certain prescribed medi- 
cations. 

Usually the same diet is ordered 
in cases of other intestinal dis- 
orders. 
GALL BLADDER DIET. 

The chief function of the Gall 
Bladder is to produce and store bile, 
a necessary adjunct for the proper 
digestion and assimilation of fats in 
foodstuffs. So a disorder of the gall 
bladder reduces the ability of the 
system to readily digest fats. Con- 
sequently, all foods in this category 
must be restricted or entirely for- 
bidden, depending on the serious- 
ness of the condition. Fat then is 
the key to the gall bladder diet. 
Strongly-flavored and spicy foods 
should also be withdrawn since such 
foods require a first-class digestive 
system. 

In preparing a gall bladder diet 
only two factors must really be 
kept in mind ; no fat, fatty or fried 
foods and no strongly-flavored ones. 
The rest is quite simple. 

DIABETIC DIET. 

Diabetis seems to be on the in- 
crease and we Passionists possess 
no special immunity as the number 
of known diabetics in the Congrega- 
tion indicates. And it is quite pos- 
sible that there are a number of un- 
known cases among us. 

When the Pancreas fails to func- 
tion properly, the supply of insulin 
to the digestive system is greatly 
reduced. This insulin is absolutely 



243 



necessary for the complete diges- 
tion and utilization of sugars and 
starches (carbohydrates). Chronic 
diabetis admits of no cure and it is 
unfortunate that in most cases the 
illness is well into its chronic stage 
before being discovered. However, 
this disease can be controlled. In- 
cipient cases need only a special 
diet. The more severe need arid 
must have regular insulin injec- 
tions. In both, though, diet is a 
must. 

The diabetic is limited to specific 
amounts of carbohydrate foods in 
particular and in a lesser degree 
to proteins as well. This means 
that the amount is what counts and 
so the diabetic diet is mainly a 
question of "how much." Special 
attention must be paid to carbo- 
hydrate foods which turn to sugar 
in the body. Refined or cane sugar 
and all foods prepared with sugar 
are entirely omitted. 

The working basis then is to be 
well acquainted with the carbohy- 
drate foods. Thus high-carbohy- 
drates are easily distinguished from 
those which contain a moderate or 
minimum amount. The other major 
factor is to rigidly adhere to the 
specified amounts prescribed in the 
diet. 

REDUCING DIET. 

The last but certainly not the 
least of the corrective diets under 
consideration is the one known as 
weight-reducing. This type of diet 
is attempted more often than the 



others and for the majority it is 
the most difficult diet to keep be- 
cause the most appealing foods have 
to be avoided. Likewise since this 
diet is often more honored in the 
breach than the observance, il 
creates a special difficulty for the 
Brother. Despite his good inten- 
tions and efforts the results can add 
up to just zero. 

This reducing diet is of extreme 
importance in certain illnesses 
particularly where heart conditions 
and high blood pressure are intensi- 
fied through over-weight. It cannol 
be denied that in these days suet 
heart conditions and hypertensior 
combined with excessive weight are 
alarmingly prevalent. 

Of course, unusual obesity re- 
sulting from glandular irregular- 
ity is not within the scope of this 
discussion. But some who are portlj 
by nature at times do acquire z 
much more pronounced portliness 
Others, never built to carry weighl 
without undesirable consequences 
manage to gain avoirdupois out o1 
all proportion. Both these condi- 
tions can be dangerous and extreme- 
ly so where various heart ailment* 
and high blood pressure are pres- 
ent. 

Generally speaking, excessive 
weight is due to the taking int( 
the system more energy than it car 
use in daily living. This does nol 
imply that one is eating exceptiona 
quantities of food. It is merely I 
case of one eating more than on* 



244 



leeds of certain energy-producing 
foods; the too liberal consuming 
of high-carbohydrate and fat-rich 
foods. 

A reducing diet obviously cur- 
tails to a great decree the daily 
consumption of such classes of food. 
This type of diet is made up of low- 
carbohydrates, watery food items 
such as fatless broths, sugarless 
juices, fresh fruits, leafy vegeta- 
bles, lean meats and fish and plain 
salads without dressings. 

A dieter might be dismayed to 
find he is forbidden so many de- 
licious foods and especially certain 
favorites of which he is very fond. 
Yet it is not too difficult for the 
Brother to prepare such a diet in 
a way that will appreciably lessen 
the chagrin of the dieter at the loss 
of his favorite foods. The secret 
is to stress a special touch in prep- 
aration along with variety and at- 
tractiveness. Many who have been 
saddled with such a diet have been 
pleasantly surprised at the amount 
of food they are still permitted to 
consume with an accompanying 
sense of satiety. 

However, this weight-reducing 
diet consistently calls for the ex- 
ercise of the will. If an individual 
slips up very much on an ulcer diet, 
or a gall bladder or diabetic diet, 
such a one knows that the result 
is painful and the effects terribly 
distressing. This is not the case 
directly with a non-observance of a 
weight-reducing diet. And the 



temptation is ever present to try 
just this once a few of the for- 
bidden items. Just this once then 
becomes once in alarmingly quick 
succession. The will must make up 
for the painful reminders that the 
other diets possess to caution the 
dieter that he not 'on the beam'. 
(DIET CHART will be found on 
Page 246) 

CONCLUSION 

We have considered the great 
part that corrective diets play in 
the recovery from certain illnesses 
and specific conditions, a part which 
carries such great weight with 
modern medical authorities. Fur- 
thermore, we have seen the solici- 
tude of our Holy Founder, St. Paul 
of the Cross, in such matters. Cer- 
tainly the use of special diets in 
providing for the needs of sick reli- 
gious is in accordance with his own 
spirit. Our own concern is but in 
imitation of his. 

In the light of all that has been 
said, a religious ordered on a diet 
by a competent physician should 
not hesitate to present his diet prob- 
lem to the Superior with a view 
that arrangements be made for the 
said diet to be properly prepared. 
Likewise we have shown that a 
Brother can easily and effectively 
prepare the diet without having 
had an extensive and specialized 
course in nutrition. 

Of course, the religious family 
like any social group can never 
be free of the faddist and the 



245 



GUIDE FOR COMMON DIETS. 



FOODS 

FRIED 

BLAND 

ROUGH 

STRONGLY 
FLAVORED 



ULCER- 
COLON 

N. A. 

A. 
N. A. 



FATTY 
HI-CARBO 

A. — Allowed 

(1) 



N. A. 
R. (1) 
R. (2) 



N. A. 

R. (3) 

A. 

N. A. 
N. A. 
R. (4) 



N. A.— Not Allowed 



N. A. 
R. (5) 
R. (6) 

R. (7) 
R. (8) 
R. (9) 
R- 



N. A. 
R. (10) 
R. (ID 

R. (12) 
N. A. 
N. A. 
-Restricted 



Only mild-flavored fats permitted such as butter, cream, 

cream cheese and ice cream. 

All permitted except the rough foods like beans with shells, 

peas, whole grains, and pastries of all kinds. 

Foods with fatty contents such as eggs, cream, rich deserts, 

milk, ice cream, are excluded. 

No foods with fatty content allowed. 

A diabetic is greatly restricted to a definite amount of 
food — calories — per meal and so he is allowed only a very 
limited amount of foods that are rich in fat and high, in 
c carbohydrates. 

(10) All high-carbohydrate and fat-rich foods from these groups 
are forbidden. 

(11) No high-carbohydrates from this group permitted. 

(12) No fatty foods allowed. 



(2) 
(3) 

(4) 

5 
6 

8 
9 



eccentric. And such a person when 
placed on a diet can be a source of 
difficulty in a community. Yet the 
danger of an unpleasant reaction 
caused by a few should in no way 
minimize the positive need of the 
greater number who value the good 
results of a necessary diet and who 
appreciate the efforts of those re- 



sponsible for the preparation. 

Above all there should be mutual 
co-operation. Without it, the task 
of the Brother responsible, can be 
very difficult. His position does not 
permit him to censure a priest- 
patient who fails to co-operate, 
When the Brother is guilty of nci 
infidelity on his part in preparing 



246 



the needed diet but fails to re- 
ceive the full co-operation of the 
dieter, he is placed in a very un- 
enviable position. He hesitates to 
touch on the matter of unco- 
operation with the patient directly 
and he is equally reluctant to bring 
the situation to the attention of the 
Superior even though he has every 
right to do so. Mutual co-operation 
can make the whole procedure very 
beneficial to the patient and as- 
sure the Brother that his efforts are 
fully appreciated. 

There is another consideration 
which deserves mention. It is the 
courtesy of notifying the Brother 
if the dieter is not taking a meal 
in the monastery. How often it 
has happened that the Brother has 
?one to the trouble of preparing 



detailed dishes only to find that the 
individual concerned will not be 
home or that he has left on a 
ministerial assignment. A Brother 
always appreciates such a consider- 
ation. 

So with mutual co-operation 
great good can be accomplished. 
The sick religious regains his health 
and his usefulness to the community 
restored. And the Brother, in ren- 
dering faithfully this service of 
diet-preparation under such pleas- 
ant and co-operative circumstances, 
is helped to measure up to the 
ideal set forth by St. Paul of the 
Cross: "If angels took bodies and 
dwelt on earth, they would apply 
themselves to two things : serving 
Mass and waiting on the sick!" 







THE PASSIONIST 












&x,tend<i Aqmfiatkif sta 








Rev. 


Fr. 


Sylvester (Cichanski), C. P., on the 


death 


of 


his 


Mothei 










Rev. 


Fr. 


Forrest (Macken), C. P., on the death of his Father. 






R. I. P. 









1247 



Our Customs (Continued from page 200) 

SENIORITY 

1. Advanced age alone does not cannot 
bring us any privilege; it can be 
the reason for exemption from reg- 
ular observance, especially when ac- 
companied by poor health. Tradi- 
tional usage has been not to arro- 
gate exemptions for oneself at one's 
own discretion, but to seek them in 
writing from the General or Pro- 
vincial. Both subjects and superi- 
ors should be careful to keep these 
exemptions within the limits of 
strict necessity. It has been a 
source of edification in our com- 
munities to see the tender charity 
of superiors toward the old who are 
in need of care. The same must be 
said of the confidence shown by the 
old in the arrangements of superi- 
ors and in their indifference to- 
ward remedies and medicines less 
conformable to our state. 

2. Seniority of profession always 
carries with it precedence of order 
in community exercises and in tak- 
ing the place of superior when the 
Rector, Vicar, and other dignitaries 
are absent. In such cases, however, 
the senior religious does not ac- 
quire any authority, either juris- 
dictional or dominative, unless it 
is expressly conferred on him. 
Therefore, his vicarious superiori- 
ty, or rather priority, serves only 
for taking care of business that 

SERVANTS 

1. To do the work and carry on nity, there 



be deferred, and also for 
meeting any needs regarding the 
regular observance. It is about the 
same when several religious are to- 
gether outside the retreat; the sen- 
ior then acts as quasi-superior to- 
ward the rest, unless otherwise ar- 
ranged by the Superior. If one 
should be a priest and several broth- 
ers, the priestly dignity takes pre- 
cedence over the others. 

3. Generally, those who are older 
in age or profession are excused 
from the domestic offices when there 
are younger religious in the com- 
munity, who are better able to do 
them. But if there are not enough 
young men, the seniors have to help 
out according to their ability. We 
read of our first Fathers that when 
it was necessary by reason of the 
many offices, even the Superiors did 
not disdain to lend a hand. 

4. It has happened at times that 
certain religious who have filled 
with credit the posts of higher su- 
periors, become in time unable to 
bear the responsibilities of office. 
In such cases it has been customaryi 
to grant them some honorary title) 
and to exempt them from the juris- 
diction and power of local superiors. 
In this way they can enjoy the priv- 
ileges and exemptions which they 
had when they were superiors. 



the business at home and outside 
which religious cannot do with dig- 



must be at least one 
hired man in each retreat. He is 
called a servant, or domestic. If 



248 



several are necessary, then the local 
Superior can engage them, if the 
retreat can afford to. The Superior 
must carefully investigate their 
suitability, health, and morals be- 
fore admitting them to the com- 
munity. He should prefer to hire 
bachelors or widowers, somewhat 
advanced in age, and not men from 
the neighboring town or those who 
have relatives close at hand. 

2. The servants' house is to be 
on our property and should not 
have an entrance of its own opening 
on the public road. If it is impos- 
sible to have such a small house, the 
servants may live in one of the far 
corners of the monastery, but with 
an entrance to the outside. In addi- 
tion to their salary they are given 
room and board and ordinary medi- 
cines, if they get sick. The quantity 
and quality of food they receive is 
about the same as that commonly 
given the religious. When they 
are doing extraordinary work, they 
get more to eat. On Christmas and 
Easter a gift of money is made 
them. 

3. Zealous superiors have profit- 
ed by the presence of servants to 
work for their souls' salvation. 
They try to get them to Mass in 
the morning, if possible. They are 
encouraged to say a third part of 
the holy rosary in the evening be- 
fore retiring and are invited to the 
sacred functions in the church. 
They are urged to frequent the sac- 
raments, especially on more solemn 



feasts. A priest is appointed to 
instruct them in christian doctrine 
for a half hour on Sundays; he may 
do this during the evening prayer 
time. On feasts of precept they 
are given a half day of work, and 
may leave the property, but in 
turns, if there are several, so that 
one of them is always at home. If 
this permission to leave the prop- 
erty is used for getting into trouble, 
it would be a reason for dismissing 
a servant. 

4. A common key can be given to 
servants who have been with us a 
long time and have been found 
trustworthy. This key, though, 
should be only for the outside gates 
and the doors of the retreat through 
which they have to enter frequent- 
ly. In order that the locks of the 
doors may not have to be changed, 
the teeth of the keys given the ser- 
vants may be filed so as to open on- 
ly the doors they will use. The Su- 
perior must watch that the ser- 
vants, even during free time, ab- 
stain from games and noisiness and 
that they do not bring seculars 
within the walls; they should be 
watched lest they spend a lot of 
time talking to seculars who chance 
by. Moreover, they should not hold 
conversations with the religious. 
The job of taking care of the ser- 
vants belongs usually to the Vicar, 
and they must do as he decides. 
In any business carried on by the 
servants, they should never do any- 
thing againsl the knowledge and 
will of the Superior. 



249 



THE SICK 



1. It is a long standing tradition 
in our Congregation — and pre- 
scribed by our Rule and the exam- 
ple of our Holy Founder — to show 
special care to our sick religious. 
But such care is only for those who 
are truly sick. If we did so for ev- 
ery trifling ache and pain, we would 
have to abandon the austere tenor 
of our life and neglect the observ- 
ance of our Holy Rule, which cer- 
tainly was not written for habitual 
comfort-seekers. So in minor ail- 
ments, where there is no danger of 
grave sickness developing, good re- 
ligious will patiently bear poor 
health with edifying submission 
to the Divine Will. They will use 
the simple and ordinary remedies 
that can be found in the retreat. 
Without necessity and merely for 
comfort, our religious are not to be 
allowed a soft bed; nor should they 
sleep without the habit, use shoes, 
stockings, and linen under clothing ; 
they should not expect special food 
or anything else extraordinary. Our 
forerunners, in the fervor of their 
spirit, used such privileges as little 
and as rarely as possible, and after 
the necessity had passed, returned 
immediately to our accustomed way 
of life. However, this should not 
hinder the Superiors from abound- 
ing in charity and making certain 
that no religious has occasion for 
just complaint. So whenever there 
is a real sickness, the Superior 
should be the first one to be con- 



cerned for the health of the re- 
ligious. He should summon the doc- 
tor in time and see that his pre- 
scription is carried out. In a word 
let him do all that is of avail foi 
the relief and cure of the sick. 

2. The Holy Rule speaks of hav- 
ing certain rooms reserved as ar 
infirmary, but in many of the smal- 
ler retreats this is not possible. Ir 
the smaller retreats the sick re- 
ligious are transferred to a rooir 
more easy of access. When circum- 
stances do not permit this, charitj 
will provide as best it can, even tc 
the extent of transferring one witl 
a lingering illness to another mon- 
astery. 

3. It is absolutely necessary t< 
have in our houses the ordinarj 
equipment required in caring fo] 
the sick: e.g. mattresses, wooler 
pillows, sheets, undershirts, towels 
linen cloths, bandages and the like 
also earthenware vessels, drinking 
glasses, bottles, cups, and so forth 
It is likewise our practice to have 
a small cabinet of ordinary medi- 
cines on hand for common ailments 
There may even be a few surgica 
instruments, in case any of the 
religious is experienced in theii 
use. The key of this cabinet is kepi 
by the Brother Infirmarian; h« 
must also keep everything clean 
well arranged, and ready for use 
and reorder the supplies when need 
ed. 

4. The care of the infirmary an( 



250 



the medicine cabinet is entrusted 
to a brother whose ability and 
parity render him capable for the 
job. In order that he may learn a 
few basic essentials of practical 
nursing, he should have some sim- 
ple handbooks on medicine, surgery, 
and pharmacy, as well as the neces- 
sary instruments. But he must 
?ain his experience under the di- 
rection of an older and skilled in- 
irmarian. If at all possible, he 
should visit a men's hospital to get 
:urther instruction. The Provin- 
ials should interest themselves in 
his matter; up to the present, 
ertain young brothers have been 
ent from Italian monasteries to 
he generalate in Rome, where they 
nay the better receive this train- 
ng. 

5. It is evident that the office of 
nfirmarian is so important that 
he brother should always be on 
land for the religious who need his 
ervices. For the sake of efficiency, 
he Regulations (n. 277) order Su- 
leriors to provide the infirmarian 
vith the discretionary power need- 
d to fulfill his duty: as for exam- 
le, to buy and use medicines for 
he sick, to give special food, to use 
:itchen utensils, to buy meat and 
ther food for the sick, to wash and 
■pair the clothing of the sick — in 
word, whatever is necessary to 
ulfill his important office. The 
lind of the Holy Rule and our Su- 
eriors is clear regarding the care 
d be given the sick. Hence it fol- 
>ws that the infirmarian must not 



only fulfill his duty, but he must 
do so with all kindness and charity, 
avoiding any contempt, harshness, 
or reprehension. Since it is his 
work to compassionate and help his 
brethren, he should show them well- 
meaning favor whether they be su- 
periors or subjects, for in all he 
should see the Lord Jesus Christ. 

6. All that has been said of the 
sick refers not only to those laid 
up in bed, but also to the convales- 
cent and to those with chronic ill- 
nesses. All can expect the friendly 
care of the infirmarian, whose duty 
it is to prepare the diets they need, 
even when they eat in the refectory 
with the rest of the religious. When 
the sick or convalescent cannot eat 
with the community and it happens 
that the infirmarian is busy, his 
place shall be supplied by some 
other brother. The meal-tray of 
a sick priest, cleric, or brother is 
brought to him by another priest, 
cleric, or brother respectively. This 
distinction, however, may yield to 
any necessity, and each religious 
should be ready to perform this act 
of charity for any of his brethren. 

7. Besides the infirmarian, who 
frequently visits the sick and 
cleans their rooms, clothing, etc., 
it is customary for the other re- 
ligious to visit them, to offer their 
assistance, and to cheer them up. 
Therefore, during recreation time 
the one who brought the meal-tray 
remains to keep them company. But 
superiors are always watchful lest 
with a number of religious need- 



251 



lessly crowded into the sick room, 
this work of charity degenerate in- 
to an occasion for wasting time in 
idle and useless conversations. It 
is better for one visitor to leave 
when another comes. In ordinary 
illnesses, where there is no special 
danger, the infirmarian looks in on 
the sick at night when he gets up 
for Matins, in the morning after 
prayer, before Sext and None, be- 
fore rest, and after Vespers. In 
more serious cases he comes more 
often, and when death is imminent, 
someone should always be with the 
sick person; the Superior appoints 
priests and brothers to take their 
turn at this during the night. Gen- 
erally there are two religious ap- 
pointed to watch for two-hour pe- 



riods, one a priest and one a broth- 
er, so that both spiritual and cor- 
poral needs may be attended. After 
their period of watching, one of 
them goes to awaken the next two 
on the list. 

8. The Brother Infirmarian 
should keep a small baldacchino and 
the other things needed for bring- 
ing Holy Communion to the sick. 
After death, it is his job, with the 
help of other religious, to lay out 
the body for burial. This same 
brother accompanies the doctors 
coming to the monastery, and gives 
them any tokens of gratitude the 
Superior may have arranged for. 
These doctors are regarded as bene- 
factors, especially if they give their 
services gratuitously. 



"SELECTED LETTERS OF 
RECENT PASSIONIST GENERALS" 

Edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew (Vetter) of the Holy 

Family, C.P. 



Containing 14 Letters of past and present 

Generals, 1925-1950, 315 pages with Index. 

$2.00 



Order from "The Passionist." 



252 



OldaUtaHe jftom 

"Ike PaUUmUi 



1) Masses of the Passion (English) 

2) Mass of St. Gemma (Latin for large Missal) 

3) Office of St. Gemma (limited supply) 

4) "God's Own Method" by Fr. Aloysius, C.P. 

5) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis C.P. 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of the Passionist Novice 

8) Order to be observed by C.P. Choir at High-or Solemn Mass 

9) Passionist Bulletin (Nos. 19-28) bound 

10) "THE PASSIONIST" 1948, 1949, bound 

11) Mary's Cavalier (St. Gabriel) by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P. 

13) Voice and Speech Routine by Fr. Conleth, C.P. 

14) First Catholic Mission to the Australian Aborigines, by Fr. 

Osmund, C.P. 

15) Hymn to St. Mary Goretti. 

16) "Selected Letters of Recent Passionist Generals" edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P. 



. >.^_ >«a» .« 




BULLETIN OF HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 











-^^^ s ____. 1 ~ 


mm 9B '^m ?■ PI ■■ ;5 


H 







II 







THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished quarterly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each March, 
June, September, and Decem- 
ber. Financed by free-will of- 
ferings of its readers. There 
is no Copyright. The paper is 
a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. Contributions of our 
Missionaries to the Mission- 
ary Forum are invited. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Vox Patris 253 

Old Kentucky Home 255 

Number of the Nails 261 

Dogma of the Assumption 267 

Chaplet of the Five Wounds 270 

Brother Isidore 275 

Blessed Julian Maunoir 281 

Out of Print 285 

General Statistics 290 

Holy Cross Province 292 

Eastern Province 311 

Provinces Abroad 315 

Bulletin Board 318 

Who's Who 321 



/OX PATRIS 



'aul of the Cross, General of the 
Hscalced Clerics of Our Lord's Pas- 
ion, to the Rev. Fathers in Christ 
rho must be called to the coming 
reneral Chapter of our congregation, 
rreetings in the Lord. l 

rHE anxiety of a well-meaning 
soul desiring to be of service, 
onstantly presses us in the depth 
f our heart. It is the one especial- 
, among many cares which weigh 
own our painful old age more and 
lore every day. This is because of 
lie deep desire we have of serving 
i every way, even with our failing 
trength, the particular and com- 
lon good of the Congregation. The 
oke we bear begets the zeal that 
rges us to fulfill completely the 
uties demanded by our office. And 
3 ceaseless care is demanded from 
ach one of you, chosen Fathers, 
) carry out perfectly what you 
ave established for the soundest 
Dvernment of the Congregation. 
It is certainly clear from the 
test decree of the Provincial of 
le Congregation that on the com- 
[g May 7, the General Chapter 
lould be held in this Retreat of 
Michael the Archangel. But we 




wish to comply with the directions 
of the Rule, and to bring it to 
your minds more strongly by a 
previous announcement filled with 
earnest exhortation. And so by this 
letter we wish to solemnly announce 
the celebration of the Chapter. Let 
no one then who is bound by the 
laws of assembling from his grave 
office, think of not being there on 
account of any business. We call, 
and at the same time order with 
our full authority each and every- 
one who enjoys the right of com- 
ing to the chapter, to be present 
at the appointed time. This means 
the Rev. Frs. Consultors, both Gen- 
eral and Provincial, together with 



i This is a letter convoking the Fifth General Chapter. St. Paul firmly hoped he would be 

ieved of office. He said he would retire to Montr Aruentaro to make hifl novitiate, and put 
the door of his cell: "Paul is dead." May 9th the first session was held. Fr. John Maiy 
id the dispensation obtained on April 8, allowing them to elect Fr. Paul again If they saw 
They saw (it unanimously. When his spoken protest, ions were over-ruled he handed them 
written renunciation of the election. Fr. John Mary, his confessor, finally prevailed upon 
n to take the office once again. 

253 



the Provincial himself and the other 
constituted Rectors. 

We wish all of those to whom it 
pertains to receive this announce- 
ment as though it were made ex- 
pressly to each one individually. 
But since there is no doubt that 
every good gift and every perfect 
gift comes down from above from 
the Father of Lights, all together 
in one mind we must pour forth 
common prayers to implore the Di- 
vine Wisdom dwelling in councils 
so that divine grace be poured out 
on whatever business there is to 
be discussed. Thus we may carry 
is out with a common zeal and 

counsel. So, especially to perform 
the usual triduum of prayers be- 
fore the Most Blessed Sacrament 
in one mind, we expect and order 
all who are to assemble to be here 
at least by the evening of the com- 
ing 5th of May. We are certain 
that none of those called will hesi- 
tate to comply with a great heart 
and a willing spirit. But it is of 
the greatest concern to all to have 
it greatly at heart that it may be 



done fruitfully, so to all the othei 
subjects under our authority w< 
recommend over and over agair 
that besides the prayers ordered 
they strive to recommend our worJ 
to God with other earnest prayers 
That what is asked by a manifolc; 
supplication may be sought mor« 
surely by a manifold intercession 
of Patrons, we decree that alonj 
with the triduum established bj 
Rule, the Litany of the Saints witl 
the added prayers be devoutly re 
cited in common daily in each cj 
our Churches. May Almighty Got 
keep you all and increase His grad 
and peace in you that doing th: 
will of God you may gain the en 
of your vocation and your electior 
Given from this our solitan 
House of St. Michael the Archangel 
this 15th day of January, 1769. 

Genera 

Joseph Andrew of the Immaculat 
Conception, Secretary 




254 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME 

<%facteJ sfleant ^eifieai Jjtuwilk, f(enkciy 



By GODFREY POAGE, C.P. 




IN THE SOUTHEASTERN SECTION of 
the slow-moving, brick and lime- 
stone city of Louisville stands Sa- 
cred Heart Retreat, the home 
of some thirty-seven Passionist 
priests, brothers and students. It 
is the proud boast of the city that 
it is "daughter of the East, mother 
of the West, and link that binds the 
North and South." In a way the 
same can be said of Sacred Heart 
Retreat. It was founded from Balti- 
more, sent men on to start St. 
Louis, and links Alabama with 
Illinois and the North. 



The Monastery itself was de- 
scribed, at the time of its com- 
pletion, as "one of the handsomest 
ecclesiastical structures in the 
South, complete and substantial . . . 
The front entrance to the red-brick 
building has a spacious portico 
paved with stone, and colonial pil- 
lars of stately proportions . . . Over 
the facade surmounting the build- 
ing is a belfry of graceful lines 
with a plain gilded cross." 

This is Sacred Heart Retreat as 
it is today. Let's go back to the 
beginning. . . . 

255 



COMING TO THE DIOCESE 

The Passionists first came into 
the Diocese of Louisville, on Jan- 
uary 17, 1879, when they took pos- 
session of St. Cecilia's Parish at 
the request of Bishop McCloskey. 
Two years earlier Fr. Charles Lang, 
C.P. had given a Retreat to the 
Clergy of the diocese assembled 
at Bardstown. His work won such 
favor with the Bishop that he was 
asked to conduct a Mission at the 
Cathedral in Louisville. Frs. Al- 
phonsus, Fidelis and Augustine 



Alexander were appointed to assist I 
him, and the Mission was so notice- 
ably blessed by God that soon thei 
Fathers were invited to continue! 
their work among all the English 
speaking congregations of the city, 
and also in several German par- 
ishes. 

Bishop McCloskey was most! 
cordial and confided to Frs. Charles* 
and Fidelis that "from the day on. 
which I was named Bishop, I cher- 
ished the hope of getting you Pas-« 
sionists to Louisville, so that yoil 




The first home of the Passionists in Louisville, 
Rectory at St. Cecilia's Church. 



the 



256 



might do here what you are doing 
for the clergy and people elsewhere. 
Could you, therefore, arrange for 
me to have an interview with your 
Provincial?" 

The prospect of a foundation 
seemed very promising. Very Rev. 
Fr. Victor Carrunchio, C.P. came 
on from Baltimore to confer with 
His Excellency. The Bishop's prop- 
osition was, in effect : 

1) That the Provincial permit 
one or more of our Congregation 
to take charge of St. Cecilia's 
Church. 

2) That this charge continue for 
a period of five years. 

3) That during these five years 



one priest attend to the spiritual 
and temporal wants of the said 
parish, and exert himself to the 
best of his ability to liquidate the 
heavy debt with which the parish 
was burdened. 

4) That, moreover, if it should 
meet with the approval of the Very 
Rev. General, the Fathers select a 
suitable place within a specified 
distance of Louisville and build 
a retreat. 

These proposals were accepted by 
Fr. Provincial, and then submitted 
to Most Reverend Fr. General, 
Bernard Mary Silvestrelli, for ap- 
proval. The approval was soon 
forthcoming and the letters of a- 



St. Cecilia's Church, Louis- 
ville, Kentucky, as it was 
in 1879 when the Passion - 
ists agreed to assume 
charge of the Parish for 
five years. Known as "Poor 
St. Cecilia's," because of 
the great debt on the Par- 
ish, the Passionists man- 
aged to pay off only the 
interest — $11,000 in five 
years! 




257 



greement between Bishop McClos- 
key and Fr. Victor were drawn up 
and signed on November 29, 1878. 
It was on January 17, 1879 that 
Fr. Aloysius Blakely was installed 
as Pastor of St. Cecilia, and Frs. 
Charles and Augustine were sent 
on to reside with him as mission- 
aries. 

During the following Fall con- 
siderable time was spent examining 
the various suburban districts for 
a place for the new Retreat. With- 
out exception, however, every site 
the Fathers visited turned out to 
be too expensive or too unsuitable. 
By chance Bishop McCloskey heard 
of the situation and proposed that 
the property held by the Sisters 
of Mercy on Newburg Road might 
suit. The property was called Mt. 
St. Mary's and was about two miles 
beyond the then city limits. 
Through no fault of the Sisters, 
the place was encumbered with 
debts to the extent of $18,786.01, 
which involved it beyond the value 
of the property, so that it was 
not a question of a good financial 
deal. However, the locality was 
unqestionably a very suitable one, 
so Fr. Provincial and his Consultors 
decided to buy it, and by redeeming 
the place from insolvency win more 
good will from the Bishop and the 
Sisters. 

Accordingly the deeds were 
drawn up and on November 26, 
1879 Fr. Eugene Ryan and Brother 
Anthony took procession of Mt. 



St. Mary's. The following April 
Brother Bonaventure came to su- 
perintend the alterations and addi- 
tions. In the meantime, Fr. Charles 
secured an act of incorporation 
from the State of Kentucky, for the 
"Sacred Heart Literary and Scien- 
tific Society of the Passionists," 
whose headquarters in Louisville 
would be known as "Sacred Heart 
Retreat." 

FORMAL OPENING 

The formal opening of the new 
Retreat took place on July 18, 1880. 
Fr. Mark Moselein, C.P., just back! 
from Rome after completing his- 
studies in the Eternal City, arrived I 
with a class of four Philosophy 
students, Conf raters Victor Clem- 
ents, Angelo Rauber, Casimir Tay- 
lor and Denis Callagee, in time fori 
the dedicatory services. Very Rev. 
Fr. Victor, the Provincial, had beeni 
delegated by the Bishop to bless; 
the Chapel and dedicate the Re- 
treat since a previous engagement! 
prevented His Excellency from at- 
tending. Several Superiors and a 
number of the Brethren of thei 
Province were present. Old Colonel' 
Watterson, former editor of thei 
Louisville Courier Journal, went 
out of his way to give an ample* 
and gracious tribute to the occa- 
sion. "The day," so he wrote, "wasi 
one of the most memorable in the* 
annals of the Passionist Order ini 
the United States" and it was one 
on which all those present "couldi 
look back with pleasure." He con-l 



258 



eluded that the Catholics "will re- 
joice at learning that the pious 
missionaries are now permanently 
located in their midst." 

Rev. Fr. Aloysius Blakely was 
appointed Rector of the new Re- 
treat, while Frs. Joseph Flanagan 
and Eugene Ryan were assigned 
to St. Cecilia's Parish. Fr. Mark 
Moeslein was made Vice-Rector. 

The Bishop paid his first visit 
to Sacred Heart Retreat on the 
feast of Our Holy Founder, the 
following April. He was accom- 
panied by his Vicar General, the 
Chancellor and twelve of the city 
pastors. The services which were 
held on this occasion inaugurated 
the devotion to St. Paul of the 
Cross which has become an annual 
affair ever since. In the morning 
there is a Solemn Mass and Sermon 
in honor of our Holy Founder, a 
dinner for the Clergy at noon, and 
blessings throughout the day. Hun- 
dreds of people come from the sur- 
rounding localities to receive the 
blessing with the relic of St. Paul 
of the Cross. 

At the Provincial Chapter of 
1881, held from July 9th to 17th, 
Fr. Charles Lang was elected Rec- 
tor of Sacred Heart. Fr. Aloysius 
returned to St. Cecilia's Church as 
Pastor. It was at this time that 
the Bishop requested the Fathers 
to take over hearing the confessions 
of the Good Shepherd Convent on 
Bank Street. 

After the Chapter, Fr. John Dom- 



inic, Second General Consultor, paid 
a visit to the new Retreat. The 
surroundings and the southern hos- 
pitality so delighted him that he 
exclaimed, within earshot of the 
community chronicler: "No house 
in this country is more in accord 
with the spirit of the Congregation 
and the requirements of the Rules 
than this Retreat!" Furthermore, 
he promised to give an even more 
glowing report to Father General 
upon his return to Rome. 

Some time later, Fr. Aloysius 
was once more relieved of the pas- 
torate of St. Cecilia's, and he went 
to West Hoboken as Vice-Rector. 
His place was taken by Fr. Anth- 
ony McHenry, who continued on 
until the end of the five-year period 
stipulated by the Bishop. In 1883, 
the Passionists left St. Cecilia's. 
It was a sad goodbye for the good 
people who had come to love the 
Passionists. The Fathers, they 
understood, had done a great deal 
for their spiritual welfare, even 
though the $11,000 they had paid 
on the parish debt had been scarcely 
enough to pay off the interest! 

GROWING COMMUNITY 

Demands for our work continued 
to increase throughout the state, 
and more and more missionaries 
came to take care of the calls. 
The little building began to bulge. 
Fr. John Thomas Stephanini, the 
Provincial, decided to add "four- 
teen new cells with sufficient water- 



259 



closets and store-rooms. " The new 
addition was completed within four 
months, and the entire cost of the 
improvements, including extension 
of steam fixtures and water supply, 
amounted to $3000. Fr. Provincial 
paid most of the bill, so the debt 
on the house remained practically 
what is was from the beginning. 

Still more enlargements were 
needed. During his visitation, the 
Fr. Provincial suggested that the 
Choir be expanded. From a small 
room, temporarily arranged, it was 
enlarged by knocking out the walls 
of two adjoining rooms, and the 
new Choir was fittingly decorated. 
The cost, $250, was again paid by 
Fr. Provincial. 



In March of 1884, Frs. Charles, 
the Rector, Robert and James were 
sent to St. Louis to conduct mis- 
sions in several of the Churches 
of the city. Their labours were 
crowned with extraordinary suc- 
cess, and the Most Rev. Archbishop 
Kenrick hailed their coming as "an 
advent of grace and blessings to 
his vast Archdiocese." During the 
course of his conversation with 
the Fathers, His Grace exclaimed: 
"I wish you could stay with me 
always." Fr. Robert seized the op- 
portunity to suggest a new founda- 
tion, and the Archbishop readily 
consented . . . but that is another 
story. 

(Continued on page 323) 




Sacred Heart Retreat, after the two new wings, containing 14 new cells and 
offices, were added. The religious on this picture have not been identified. 

260 



THE 

NUMBER 

OF THE 

NAILS 



CAN THE 
QUESTION BE 
SETTLED? 

By 

Louis M. O' Carroll, C.P. 



Crucifixion, among ancient peo- 
ples, was of two kinds. The 
condemned was either fastened to 
the cross with nails, or bound to 
it by cords. The latter method pre- 
vailed in Egypt, according to the 
testimony of Xenophen of Ephesus 1 . 
Among the Romans, both methods 
were in use-', but the nailing was 
more common. 

It is certain, from the Gospel 
narratives, that Our Lord was 
nailed to the Cross. Nails pierced 
not only his hands, but also (a- 




gainst the rationalist school of 
Strauss) his feet. "See my hands 
and feet ('that is, the wounds of 
the nails') 5 that it is I myself." 1 
The words of Psalm xxi, 17 ; "They 
have dug — my feet," according to 
the universal tradition of the Fa- 
thers, refer literally to the Cruci- 
fixion of Jesus'. While it cannot 
be doubted that our Lord's feet 
were nailed to the Cross, it is by 
no means certain HOW this was 
done. For there were two possible 
methods : either the feet were 

261 



placed side by side against the 
cross, being fastened by separate 
nails, or one foot was placed on top 
of the other, both being pierced 
by the same nail. The question, 
then, is: how many nails were 
used in the Chrucifixion of Jesus 
— three or four? 

EARLY WRITERS In discussing 
this question, 
the following quotation from Plau- 
tus, an early Roman writer, is 
sometimes adduced. This author 
makes one of his characters say: 
"I will give a talent to the first 
man who will undergo cruci- 
fixion, 
On this condition, however, that 
his feet and arms be fastened 
twice over." 6 
Most authors who quote this text 
say it proves that, at least some- 
times, four nails were used — two 
for the feet and two for the hands. 7 
Fillion, however, interprets the 
words differently. "In this instance, 
the extraordinary circumstance is 
that EACH MEMBER is pierced 
by two nails." 8 This latter inter- 
pretation is not impossible, for we 
know that sometimes (as in the 
case of the martyr St. Agricola) 
out of cruelty the usual number of 
nails was increased. 9 However, from 
an examination of the context of 
Plautus' words it would appear that 
neither of the above interpretations 
is the true one. The speaker, a 
slave who fears his master's pun- 
ishment, appears to be joking. He 



says he is willing to give a talent 
to any man who will take in his 
stead the punishment he fears will 
be his — obviously a ridiculous con- 
dition impossible of fufillment. 
Then he adds the further equally 
ridiculous stipulation : that the vic- 
tim be fastened to the cross "bis," 
TWICE OVER, i.e., by two nails 
where ordinarily one would have . 
been used. This would certainly 
mean two nails for each hand (in 
the ordinary course of events one 
would have been used.) What of 
the feet? The usual nailing of the 
feet is, in this case, to be done 
twice over. But what was the usual 
process ? This precisely is our ques- 
tion. Thus it would appear that 
at least from the text of Plautus 
it is impossible to decide how many 
nails were used for the feet. 

In a sermon on the Passion attri- 
buted to St. Cyprian there is a 
reference to the nails (in . the 
plural) which pierced Christ's 
feet. 10 The evidence of St. Cyprian 
(d. 258) would be of great value, 
since he himself witnessed many 
crucifixions, but fortunately the 
work attributed to him is of doubt- 
ful authenticity. Indeed, Fr. Her- 
bert Thurston, S.J., (an authority 
on the Middle Ages) says unequiv- 
ocally: "the supposed sermon of 
St. Cyprian ... is a medieval fabri- 
cation." 11 

Those who hold for three nails 
sometimes quote from the Apocry- 
phal Acts of St. Andrew the Greek 



262 



word TpLiraaaaXos used by the 
author to designate the cross. This 
is the only passage where the word 
occurs. Hug understands it of the 
three nails used in crucifixion and 
translates: "The cross of three 
nails." However, the word iracrcraXos 
in its proper signification means, 
not an iron nail, but a pointed 
piece of wood. It also has been 
observed that TpLTraaaaXo? is not 
an adjective used to qualify the 
cross, rather it is a noun. So it 
cannot be translated "a cross pro- 
vided with three nails (or points)," 
but literally "a three-point." Those 
who hold the latter interpretation 
think the author is simply refer- 
ring to the three extremities of the 
cross. 1 - 

Probably the first to speak ex- 
plicity of the number of the nails 
which pierced Our Saviour is St. 
Gregory of Tours. He states in a 
formal manner that they were four 
in number, which proves that, at 
least in the sixth century, this was 
the accepted opinion : "Clavorum 
dominicorum . . . quod quatuor fuer- 
int haec est ratio: duo sunt affixi 
in palmis, et duo in plantis." 1 * 

Like St. Gregory, all other early 
writers presume four nails. There 
are two notable exceptions — Non- 
nus (an Egyptian Bishop of the 
Fourth Century,) and the author 
of the tragedy called "Christus 
ratiens," printed among the works 
of St. Gregory Nazienzen (but 
probably the work of an eleventh 



century poet.) 11 The author of this 
tragedy calls the cross of Christ 
wood of three nails.' Nonnus, in 
%vXov rptarjXov — 'the wood of three 
nails.' Nonnus, in his prophetic 
paraphrase of St. John's Gospel (in 
c. xix) speaks of Terpa&yi Sea/xcp, 
i.e., the fourfold binding of Our 
Lord to the cross, which obviously 
refers to the four nails, Sea/xos 
'bond' being used poetically for 
'nail.' But elsewhere the same writ- 
er says that the two feet placed on 
top of each other were pierced by 
a single nail afryi yopccfxp causing 
a twofold pain htirXoov rjTcop. Hug, 
who holds that both feet were 
pierced by a single nail, under- 
stands these expressions of a nail 
provided with two prongs and 
piercing to the right and left of 
the center bone of the five meta- 
tarsals. But this would have been 
very difficult of execution. Would 
it not have been much easier to 
drive the 'double nail' into the feet 
placed side by side? Most authors 
conclude that Nonnus contradicts 
himself and hence his evidence is 
of no documentary value. "He had 
never assisted at a crucifixion, and 
with his poet imagination, he some- 
times speaks of three nails, some- 
times of four, according to the 
inspiration of the moment."'-" 1 

What have the writ- 

THF^I^A?^ erS Wh ° mention the 
finding of the nails to 

say as to their number? St. Cyril 

of Jerusalem who speaks of the 



263 



Finding of the True Cross makes 
no reference to the nails. St. Am- 
brose, in his funeral oration on the 
death of Theodosius (A.D. 395,) 
mentions that Helena found the 
nails at the same time as the cross. 
Speaking of the use made of these 
nails, he says : "de uno clavo frenos 
fieri praecepit ; de altero diadema 
intexuit." 16 These words, however, 
need not be understood too strictly, 
as if only two nails were found. 
Very probably St. Ambrose in this 
passage expresses himself oratori- 
cally, wishing merely to establish 
an antithesis between the nail em- 
ployed for the purpose of honour, 
and that employed for the purpose 
of devotion. 17 Elsewhere he calls 
the two nails sent by the Empress 
of Constantine 'ferrum pedum' (the 
nails of the feet.) 18 This expression 
manifestly supposes the existence 
of other nails for the hands, and 
likewise the fact that the feet were 
nailed separately. Furthermore, St. 
Gregory of Tours, as we have seen, 
speaks explicitly of the four nails 
found by Helena. 19 Other writers, 
such as Rufinus, Socrates, Sozomen 
and Theodoret are not very precise 
in this matter. Theophanes 20 af- 
firms that four nails were found 
by Helena. 

Of the relics venerated today the 
most famous are those at Treves, 
Monza, Carpentras and Santa Croce 
in Rome. Many of the others either 
are copies of the originals or merely 
contain filings of one of the true 



relics. Robault de Fleury, the great- 
est authority on the relics of the 
Passion, considers that the authen- 
ticity of the relics at Treves, Monza 
and Carpentras is "incontestable." 21 
Regarding the nail preserved in 
Santa Croce, he is of the opinion 
that it is possibly one of the models 
which Constantine procured to be 
made after the pattern of those 
found by Helena. 

It should be re 
TESTIMONY OF memb ered thai 
too much impoi 
tance must not be attached to th( 
evidence of art in this matter, for 
it was not until the fifth century 
that the cross began to be displayed 
on public monuments. By that time 
crucifixion as a form of capital 
punishment had been abolished. 
Stark simplicity characterizes these 
first crosses — no image of the Savi- 
our appears on them. It was not 
until the latter half of the sixth 
century that the crucifix as we 
know it began to be depicted. 22 
Some of the earliest representations 
of the crucifixion, such as the fam- 
ous carved crucifix on the door of 
the Dominican Church of St. Sabina 
in Rome and the ivory panel pre- 
served in the British Museum, show 
no trace of nails through the feet. 
However, the feet are represented, 
not indeed one on top of the other, 
but side by side. [Editor's Note: 
The Crucifix on the title page of 
this article is the famous Crucifix, 
carved from cedar of Lebanon, 



264 



which is venerated in Holy Cross 
Church, Mt. Adams, Cincinnati. It 
was presented to Holy Cross Mon- 
astery by Canon Bertinelli, of 
Rome, in April, 1873. It has been 
conjectured that it dates from about 
500 A.D. One readily notices that 
separate nails pierce both feet of 
Christ.] In the Syriac Evange- 
listary kept in the Laurentinian 
Library at Florence there is a 
Crucifixion in which the feet are 
depicted pierced by two nails. In 
the crypt of St. Valentine's Cata- 
comb on the Via Flaminia there is 
a similar representation of the 
Crucified. From this early period 
until the thirteenth century no 
artist departed from the traditional 
number of nails. Martigny 25 says 
that Cimabue and Margaritone, 
Italian painters of the thirteenth 
century, were the first to depart 
from this tradition. Their famous 
Christs, which can still be seen in 
Santa Croce at Florence, show the 
feet placed on top of one another 
and pierced by a single nail. Their 
motive for thus departing from the 
traditional manner of portrayal 
seems to have been solely artistic 
— "to bring about a more moving 
and devotional pose." 21 They were 
imitated by the school of Giotto 
and other famous artists. Conse- 
quently this type of crucifix became 
very common. 

In Byzantine ait the feet of the 
Crucified are always fastened by 
two nails. And we know that the 



Greeks were a people who adhered 
with great fidelity to their material 
traditions, such as the form of 
Baptism, leavened bread, etc. The 
Albigensians, on the contrary, 
painted the Crucifixion after the 
manner of the Italian schools. 

We must not forget to mention 
here the blasphemous caricature of 
Christ Crucified, dating from the 
beginning of the third century, 2 "' 
discovered in the year 1857 in the 
Palace of the Caesars on the Pala- 
tine. The Crucified has the body 
of a man and the head of an ass. 
The feet are not pierced by nails 
but they are separated by an ample 
space. This fact seems to confirm 
the theory of four nails, for the 
artist would naturally have repre- 
sented the crucifixion as he him- 
self witnessed it (crucifixion had 
not yet been abolished.) 



ARCHEOLOGY 



Among the ashes 



of three of the 
many funeral urns belonging to the 
Roman period unearthed near 
Mainz, nails were found to the 
number of three. One nail was 
longer than the other two. 2,; It is 
generally supposed that these ashes 
are the remains of men who had 
been crucified and whose bodies had 
been reclaimed by friends. This 
would seem to be the most obvious 
conclusion. We know, as a matter 
of fact, that from the reign of 
Augustus it became customary to 
accede to the request of relatives 
who petitioned the bodies of exe- 



266 



cuted criminals for decent burial. 27 
Consequently, this discovery ap- 
pears to be a strong argument in 
favor of the nails. One writer, 
however, is unwilling to admit that 
the ashes are those of Crucified 
men. "This hypothesis is hardly 
admissable. These urns are very 
numerous. Very many Romans must 
have died on the cross. And if 
their friends had reclaimed their 
corpses they would certainly have 
taken care not to preserve jealously 
the instruments of torture in order 
to hand them on to posterity as 
everylasting witnesses to their dis- 
grace." 28 



EVIDENCE OF 
DOCTORS 



M. Rohault de 
Fleury asserts 

that many medical 
men whom he consulted on the point 
assure him that it would have been 
impossible to pierce both feet with 
a single nail without breaking some 
bone. 29 This is a strong argument 
in favor of the twofold nailing of 
the feet, for we know that no bone 
of our Saviour's Body was brok- 
en. 30 Most likely no foot rest was 
used, and in this case it would have 
been impossible to arrange the feet 
so as to fix them with a single 
nail. 31 Lastly, if, as is probable, 32 
the 'sedile' formed part of the cross, 
the prisoner's feet would be hang- 
ing almost at the sides of the verti- 
cal beam and so could not be 
crossed. 33 Experimenting on AM- 
PUTATED LIMBS, Dr. Pierre 
Barbet, on the contrary, showed 



that was possible to fix both feet 
with a single nail. "Experimenting 
on amputated limbs, he found that 
to drive a nail through the massive 
bones of the instep of even one 
foot fully twenty strong blows of 
the hammer were required. . . . The 
obvious place to put the nail was! 
at the top of the free flesh be- 
tween the bones (metatarses) con-j 
necting the instep with the second 
and third toes. In his experiments 
he found that at this place a single 
blow of the hammer sufficed to] 
drive the nail through both feet." 34 



HOLY SHROUD 



The markings 
on the Holy 
Shroud of Turin are sometimes ad- 
duced as evidence that only three 
nails were used in the Crucifixion 
of Jesus. The following facts are 
pointed out: (a) The anterior por- 
tion of the right foot is concealed 
by the left ; (b) the left leg appears 
to be about two inches shorter than 
the right; (c) there is a percep- 
tible closing in of the left leg 
below the knee towards the right., 
These facts are presented by cer- 
tain writers 35 as evidence for the 
piercing of the feet by a single 
nail. This, however, is no more 
than a hypothesis, so we cannot 
afford to be dogmatic. Perhaps 
someone may yet suggest other pos- 
sible explanations of the above- 
mentioned facts. For instance, the , 
account for the apparent shortness 
of the left leg, the following hypo- 
(Continued on page 331) 



266 



iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimi 



o 



of the 




November 1, 1950 

By 

FR. JOSEPH MARY, C.P. 

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 f l 




N THIS BLESSED DAY of All 

Saints, in the Holy Year of 
our Lord, the great square of St. 
Peter's Basilica was "charged with 
the grandeur of God" and the Holy 
Spirit brooded over it with love. 
It was, indeed, "good for us to be 
here" as the voice of Peter pro- 
claimed the glory of God's Mother, 
not to three chosen ones but to well 
over half a million faithful, repre- 
senting and praying for all the 
members of Christ's Mystical Body. 

Yesterday, clergy and laity ex- 
pressed their living faith and lov- 
ing expectation in a great parade 
that came from the Church of Ara 
Coeli (Altar of Heaven) to St. 
Peter's Square to present an image 
of the Immaculate Virgin to the 
Holy Father. The parade lasted 
for over three hours. Specially sig- 
nificant were the groups from the 
lands behind the Iron Curtain, and 
the proud marchers from Bologna 
and Rome, who had turned back 
the challenge of Communism in a 
dark hour. 

This morning, all roads in Rome 
were eagerly thronged with anxious 
and loving men, women, and chil- 
dren, hurrying to the great square 
of St. Peter's Basilica. The doors 
were to be closed at 8:00 A.M., 
when all holding tickets were re- 
quired to be in the Church. With- 
in, there were 40,000 or more. 

Without, at 8:00 A.M. the great 
square was already filled ; those 
coming after took places along the 

2(57 



streets that lead to the basilica. 
Roofs and windows of the surround- 
ing houses held their privileged 
quotas. 

From time to time the loud- 
speakers from St. Peter's carried 
announcements of the preparations. 
Meanwhile, we stood and gazed, 
prayed and sang. The lovely Ave 
Maria of Lourdes was intoned at 
intervals ; popular hymns to the 
Virgin were lifted up to Heaven's 
Queen in welcome. One thing was 
deeply impressive. The vast crowd 
was made up of at least as many 
men as women. And the little ones 
of Christ's Kingdom, carried shoul- 
der-high, clapped and gestured with 
the innate grace of the Latin. 

The function proper began about 
8:45 with the solemn procession 
from the Chapel of Sixtus IV to 
the right side of the square, and 
on to the central approach to the 
main doors of the basilica, where 
the papal throne had been erected. 
For over half an hour came clergy, 
bishops and cardinals. At 9:15, 
the Holy Father appeared in the 
Sedia Gestatoria, blessing his flock, 
who gave him love and welcome and 
acclamation. During the Procession, 
the Litany of the Saints was chant- 
ed over the loudspeakers, the people 
answering the responses. 

At about 9:15, the Holy Father 
had ascended the throne. After the 
cardinals had made their obeisance, 
Cardinal Tisserant, in clear and 
majestic Latin, requested the sov- 



ereign Pontiff to proclaim the dog- 
ma of Mary's Assumption. The 
Veni Creator and accompanying 
prayers were chanted. All was 
ready. 

At 9:38 A.M., Pius XII, succes- 
sor of St. Peter as Vicar of Jesus 
Christ, rose up before the greatest 
gathering in the history of the 
Church, and in a strong, clear voice 
defined the dogma of Mary's As- 
sumption. "After we have again 
and again directed prayers and 
suplications to God and invoked the 
light of the Spirit of Truth, for the 
glory of the Omnipotent God, Who 
has shown His singular benevolence 
to the Virgin Mary, for the honor 
of His Son, immortal King of ages 
and victor over sin and death, for] 
the greater glory of the Son's au- 
gust Mother, for the joy and ex- 
altation of the whole Church, by 
the authority of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, of the Blessed Apostles 
Peter and Paul, and our own au- 
thority, we pronounce, declare and 
define as a divinely revealed dogma : 
The Immaculate Mother of God and 
ever Virgin Mary, after the course 
of earthly life, was assumed, body 
and soul, to the glory of Heaven." 

A few moments before the defini- 
tion, the sun had come through the 
clouds, pouring a white radiance 
of spreading sunshine over Pope 
and faithful. Flocks of birds flew 
out from the colonnades, descend- 
ants of St. Francis' little sisters. 
When the Father of Christendom 



268 



had placed this new gem in Mary's 
crown, many in the crowd gave full 
vent to their enthusiasm ; many 
wept and prayed in this supreme 
hour of privilege. 

Then the loudspeakers called up- 
on all to attend to the words of 
the Holy Father. The Pope then 
rose from his throne and addressed 
the world. He called upon all to 
end strife and conflict, to turn with 
new hope to Maria Assumpta. He 
spoke as one "full of faith and the 
Holy Spirit — his face was as though 
it were the face of an angel." 



The Te Deum was solemnly 
chanted by all. Half a million tried 
to kneel as the apostolic benedic- 
tion descended upon them. The Holy 
Father was now carried into the 
basilica for the papal Mass. 

As the crowd began to disperse, 
the loudspeakers intoned the Ni- 
cene Creed. With full hearts, we 
all took up the grand confession 
of faith. Nice — Constantinople — 
Peter's Square. We give thee 
thanks, Lord. It was good to be 
here. 




OUR COVER 

Sacred Heart Retreat, Louisville, Kentucky, has been acclaimed for years as 
»ne of the beauty spots of Louisville. The graceful columns — which formed part 
of the original building built almost 100 years ago — and the southern entrance 
beckon to the visitor and seem to assure him of that gracious "southern hos- 
)itality." In this issue we begin the story of Sacred Heart Retreat. 



269 



Chaplet 
of the 

me 

WOUNDS 



ITS HISTORY 
BLESSING AND 
INDULGENCES 




The use of beads to number one's 
prayers is one of the oldest 
forms of devotion. It is most an- 
cient, both among Christians and 
among pagans. It is commonly ad- 
mitted, however, that the Christian 
practice became popular around the 
time of St. Dominic, who, at the 
inspiration of the Mother of God, 
introduced and propagated the Ros- 
ary. 

The Church since has approved 
a large number of different beads. 
Most of them were introduced and 
fostered among the faithful by vari- 

270 



ius religious orders, in order to? 
spread their particular devotioni 
Thus, the Servites have the Sevens 
Dolor Beads, the Cozier Fathers; 
have the Crozier Beads, the Brigit- 
tines have the Brigittine Beads. Ini 
the same way, we have the Chapletj 1 
of the Five Wounds, as a means to 
promote devotion to the Passioni 
of Chirst in the hearts of the faith- 
ful. The Five Wound Beads has, 
been approved, directly and indi-i 
rectly, by several Popes, and has 
ben enriched with special indul- 
gences. 1 



HISTORY 



The first mention of 
the Five Wound Beads 
in the documents of the Congrega- 
tion appears in 1821. The Platea 
of Sts. John and Paul, at Rome, 
relates that "The Most Reverend 
Father General, acting in accord- 
ance with our spirit to promote 
devotion to the Passion of Our Lord 
Jesus Christ, obtained permission 
to bless the Chaplet of the Five 
Wounds, at the same time enrich- 
ing it with indulgences. He pur- 
chased dies and had the medals 
stamped, at the same time he print- 
ed several thousand leaflets con- 
taining short affective prayers in 
honor of the Holy Wounds. These 
leaflets, beads and medals he has 
distributed among the Missionaries, 
especially, in order that they may 
give them to the faithful, and pro- 
mote this salutary devotion in every 
possible manner." (Platea, Vol. I, 
p. 98) 

The Chaplet of the Five Wounds 
was first approved by a Decree of 
Pope Pius VII, dated January 22, 
1822. According to this earliest 
form, the Beads consisted of five 
sections, and each section consisted 
of five beads, on each of which was 
said an Our Father, Hail Mary and 
Glory be to the Father. Between 
each of the five sections, one Hail 
Mary was said in honor of Our 
Lady of Sorrows. - 

In this form the Chaplet of the 
Five Wounds was found too long. 
To render its use somewhat easier, 



the Father General of the Congre- 
gation asked Pope Leo XII, viva 
voce, that, without losing the in- 
dulgences, it might henceforth suf- 
fice to say only a Glory be to the 
Father on each bead, with a Hail 
Mary between the sections. Wit- 
ness to this concession exists in 
the Platea of Sts. John and Paul. 
"After the election of Cardinal 
Delia Genga, the Cardinal Vicar, 
to the Pontificate under the name 
of Leo XII, the Most Reverend 
Father General, together with his 
Consultor, Fr. Luke, went to call 
upon him. His Holiness received 
them with evident affection. Later, 
when the Holy Father came to San 
Gregorio, during the Octave of All 
Souls, the whole religious commun- 
ity went to kiss his feet in the 
Monks' sacristy. Again the Pope 
expressed the affectionate esteem 
he had for the Congregation. Then, 
in the hope of facilitating (the 
use of the Five Wound Beads) 
and thus promoting more widely 
the devotion to the Passion of Our 
Lord, the General besought and ob- 
tained his wish that, it be sufficient 
to recite five Glory be to the Fa- 
thers and one Hail Mary on each 
section of the Beads in order to 
gain the indulgences attached to 
their recitation." (Platea, p. 101) 

This concession of Pope Leo XII, 
rendering the recitation of the Five 
Wound Beads much easier and 
shorter, was later expressed in the 
Decree of approval of the same 



271 



Pontiff. It is dated Dec. 20, 1823 
and contains a quasi-definition of 
the Chaplet, in these words : "This 
Chaplet is a formula of prayer con- 
taining five sections of five beads 
each. On each bead one Glory be 
to the Father is said, and between 
the sections one Hail Mary in honor 
of the Sorrowful Virgin. During 
each of the sections the Wounds of 
Our Lord Jesus Christ are piously 
meditated upon." 3 

This manner of saying the Five 
Wound Beads, approved by Leo XII 
in 1823, has not changed up to the 
present time. The later Decree of 
Pope Pius IX concerns only the 
Indulgences, leaving the Beads 
themselves untouched. 4 

It will be noticed that Pope Leo 
XIFs descriptive definition makes 
no mention of either the medals 
we customarily find attached to the 
beads or the three added beads at 
the beginning of the Chaplet. Since 
these latter are nowhere mentioned, 
we infer that they are not necessary 
to gain the Indulgences attached 
to the recitation of the Five Wound 
Beads. In regard to the familiar 
medals, we definitely know that they 
are not required. These medals, 
depicting the wounds of Christ and, 
on their reverse side, Our Lady of 
Sorrows, have been used from the 
very first to separate the different 
sections of the Beads and distin- 
guish them. However, there is an 
autographed declaration of the Fa- 
ther General, Anthony of St. Jo- 



1 1 1 II 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 3 II 111 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

1. The Wound is an- 
nounced. E.G., "The 
Wound in the Sacred 
Side." 



2. The "Glory be to the 
Father, etc.," is re- 
peated five times, 
once for each bead. 



3. One "Hail Mary" is 
said. 




Diagram showing how the Five Woundi 
Beads are recited. 

iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiu 

seph, added to the Decree of Popel 
Leo XII, stating, on the authoritjl 
of the same Pontiff, that the pres-fl 
ence of the medals was not requiredi 
either for the blessing or for gain-J 
ing the indulgences. 5 

During the recitation of the Five 
Wound Beads, it is required that 
one meditate on the Wounds ofj 
Our Lord. This meditation is neces- 
sary in order to gain the indul-, 
gences, as we draw from the De-| 
cree of Pope Leo XII. 6 It was inj 
order to render this meditation 
easier for the faithful that thej 



272 



General, Paul Aloysius of the Vir- 
gin Mary, printed short prayers 
in honor of the Five Wounds, 
though it is evident from the De- 
cree that such prayers were not 
specified in order to gain the indul- 
gences. 

While on the subject of the medi- 
tation necessary while reciting the 
Beads, it is well to mention that 
the documents make no mention of 
any definite order in which the 
Wounds of Our Lord are to be 
recalled. Ordinarily we find that 
the medals are so arranged that 
we meditate first on the Wounds 
in the Left Foot of Our Blessed 
Saviour, then on that in His Right 
Foot. Third and fourth place are 
given to the Wounds in the Left 
and Right Hand Respectively. The 
Fifth Wound is the Wound in the 
Sacred Side. Obviously, however, 
this order is not prescribed that 
the indulgences be gained. 



INDULGENCES 



What these in- 
dulgences are we 
draw from two Pontifical Decrees, 
both of which have been mentioned 
above: that of Pope Leo XII, of 
Dec. 20, 1823, and that of Pope Pius 
IX, of August 11, 1851. These two 
Decrees list the following indul- 
gences : 

I. A Plenary Indulgence, once a 
day, be gained: 

a) On one Friday during the 
month of March, by those who have 
recited the Beads at least ten times 
during the same month. 



b) On the Feasts of the Finding 
and Exaltation of the Holy Cross, 
the Nativity of Our Lord, the 
Epiphany, the Most Holy Name of 
Jesus, the Resurrection, Ascension, 
Corpus Christi and the Transfig- 
uration of Our Lord Jesus Christ, 
or during their Octaves, by those 
who have recited the Beads devout- 
ly at least ten times during the 
each month. 

c) On the day on which they ful- 
fill their Easter Duty, by those who 
recite the Beads during the time 
from Passion Sunday to Holy Sat- 
urday inclusively. 

All the above indulgences re- 
quire, furthermore, the general con- 
ditions of Confession, Holy Com- 
munion, visit to some Church or 
public oratory and prayer for the 
intention of the Pope. 

II. A Partial Indulgence of: 

a) Seven years and seven quar- 
antines, each day from Passion 
Sunday to Holy Saturday inclusive- 
ly, under the usual conditions, by 
those who recite the Beads devout- 
ly. 

b) One year, once a day, during 
all the rest of the year, by those 
who have recited the Beads devout- 
ly, and with sorrow of heart. 

All the indulgences attached to 
the recitation of the Five Wound 
Beads may be gained for oneself, 
or applied to the Suffering Souls 
in Purgatory. 

In order that the 



CONDITIONS 



Beads may be bless- 



273 



ed, or that one gain the indulgences 
attached to the recitation of the 
Five Wound Beads, it is required 
that: 

a) The Beads be blessed by the 
General of the Congregation, or 
by some other priest of the same 
Congregation delegated by him. 
This delegation is today given to all 
the Fathers, as is evident from 
our Collectio Facultatum et Indul- 
gentiarum, n. 26. 

b) The Beads be made in the 
form prescribed by the Church, i.e., 
that they be arranged in five sec- 
tions of five beads each, and that 
the beads be made of some solid 
material, such as iron, wood, ebony, 
coral, etc . . . connected by a solid 
cord or wire. Those likewise may 
be blessed which are made of solid 
glass, but not those (glass) which 
are hollow. 7 

c) If the connection is broken, 
whether deliberately, so that the 
beads can again be connected by 
chain, or indeliberately and acci- 
dently, the Beads do not lose their 
blessing or indulgences, since they 
maintain their same moral form. 8 

d) The condition on the part of 
the person gaining the indulgences, 
that he meditate on the Wounds 
of Our Crucified Saviour, has al- 
ready been mentioned. 

The Decree of Pope 



FACULTY 
TO BLESS 



Leo XII, Dec. 20, 1823, 
gave the Father General 
of the Congregation the power to 
delegate this faculty only to priests 



of our Congregation. 9 Later on, 
however, when the devotion began 
to spread, through the zeal of the 
Missionaries, the General received 
permission to subdelegate other 
priests than Passionists in those 
places where we had no houses. 
This faculty, first given in 1826 
for seven years, later renewed sev- 
eral times, finally became perpetual 
through a Rescript of Pope Pius 
X, on May 18, 1907. 10 

In 1933, by the general decree 
"Consilium suum persequens," th( 
Sacred Apostolic Penitentiary re- 
scinded this faculty. This sweepinj 
decree, framed at "the express or- 
der of our Holy Father, Pope Pius 
XII," states that "for the future, 
the privileges of certain Orders and 
religious Congregations to bless 
beads and enrich them with indul- 
gences may be used by the members 
of the same Orders and Congrega- 
tions personally only, and do nol 
belong to them in such a mannei 
that they can grant them also to 
other priests who- do not belong t( 
the same Orders or religious Con- 
gregations . . ." Henceforth "al 
these faculties, necessary for th( 
use of such privileges, can be ob- 
tained only from the Sacred Apos- 
tolic Penitentiary, with the presen- 
tation of special letters of commen- 
dation from one's own Ordinary." 1 

Consequently the Rescripts an< 

Apostolic Letters, which give oui 

General the power to subdelegate 

{Continued on page 333) 



274 



Brother 
Isidore: 
Man of 
God's Will 



A SKhTCH OF HIS 
LIFE DRAWN FROM 
HIS OWN LETTERS * 

"Very Reverend, Fr. Provincial, 

I have just made the acquaint- 
ance of an excellent young man 
(26 years old) who wants to join 
you as a Lay-brother. He will come 
to see you at Eastertime or on 
some other day convenient to 
you . . ." 

Fr. Bouckaert, C.SS.R. 
The word "excellent" was under- 
lined twice. 

Ere 

Apr. 21, 1907 

Jesus and Mary be praised 

forever and ever 

Dear Parents, Brother, and Sister, 

Filial and fraternal joy fills my 

heart as I write to give the news. 

you have surely been waiting for. 




Brother Isidore of St. Joseph, C.P. 
The official processes for his beati- 
fication began just a year ago. 



We were so closely bound to one 
another at home in true Christian 
family affection that it must have 
been very painful for you to sacri- 
fice me to God. Yet you did so 
in a Christian spirit of abandon- 
ment to the Will of God. 

It is true, Father and Mother, 
that you can no longer receive any 
temporal aid from me, but the Rev. 
Fr. Master of Novices exhorted us 
to pray for you ardently morning 
and night and to remember you 



1 For ■ sketch of Br. Isidore's life see The PtUMionitt, Sept. '61, pp. liliS-lil'.t). Isidore Dc 

Iahu- was bom in Kast Flanders, Apt. IS, 1SS1, entered the Passionist Novitiate Apr. 15, 1907. 

was professed Sept. 16, 1908. died Oct. ti. 1916. Oct. tl. I960 saw the beginning bf the formal 

Inquiry into his life and virtues. This is something of his life, especially in his own words. 
from his letters home. 

275 



in our Communions. I will certain- 
ly not fail to do so. He told me 
also that you will surely be blest 
for giving me to God. That is 
why I think you will profit from 
my absence. 

My good Father, I must express 
my thanks for all you have done 



Now I wish to fulfill that duty. 
To be sure, I must thank you for 
what you have done for me from 
a temporal point of view, but above 
all for what you have done to make 
me a man worthy of being called 
by God to the religious life, a son 
to do you credit. You were, it is 




Brother Isidore of St. Joseph on his death bed. His death took 
place October 7, 1916. 



for me. I could never repay you, 
but you can hope for your recom- 
pense hereafter from God, the 
source of every good. Besides, you 
still have a son worthy of you who 
will doubly compensate for the loss 
I have caused you. 

My dear Mother, when I left 
you, I should have thanked you, 
but I did not have the strength. 



true, a strict mother, but I thank 
God for having had such a mother. 
My Mother, it cost me a great deal 
to be separated from you and I 
am sure that you have suffered it 
all too. But be comforted : it was 
not to gain money or any vain 
earthly goods. It was to accom- 
plish the Will of God to Which you 
have always submitted yourself . . 



276 



My good Brother, we used to 
help one another in everything. Be 
the support and comfort of our 
parents. It will cheer them up for 
the sacrifice they have made of me. 

My sister Stephania, I want to 
speak especially to you. The haste 
and confusion of my departure 
made me forget to say even a word 
to you. You who are my godchild, 
you can do much to bring comfort 
to our parents by ever trying to 
become prudent, obedient, obliging 
and patient. I hope you will do 
this for me so as to be a comfort 
to my Father, my Mother and my 
Brother. 

Dear Parents, Brother and Sister, 
I am really happy and contented 
here. I have never yet been weary 
of it and that is why I believe I 
am called to this state . . . 

Ere 

May 20, 1907 
Jesus and Mary be praised 
forever and ever 
Dearest Parents, Brother and Sis- 
ter, 
I am writing you again filled 
with joy for it has already been 
a month since we parted. I must 
tell you that my affection for you 
has not decreased, but increased, 
even doubled from day to day, com- 
pared to what it was when I lived 
with you. In the beginning it was 
hard enough for me to be torn 
away from your love and warm 
atmosphere, but thanks to the af- 
fection one finds here among the 



religious that feeling has already 
passed. 

How could anyone not be happy 
here when he knows that he is 
fit for the life and has received 
Our Lord's Grace for it. Besides, 
here one can praise, adore, and 
thank God night and day. This, 
as you know is my desire . . ." 

"Here we are all equal, from the 
Superior to the lowest. All at the 
same table, all united in one and 
the same prayer, all enjoying the 
same repose, the same relaxation, 
all equal in work, intellectual for 
some, manual for others, Here 
mutual service is rendered accord- 
ing to the ability and desire of 
each. Here is cultivated true love 
of the neighbor for the love of 
God." 

St. Paul of the Cross had already 
said : "After God we owe our main- 
tenance to our Brothers. They col- 
lect the alms, they prepare the 
meals, they watch over the goods 
of the Monastery. They care for 
us when we are sick as well as when 
we are in good health. Certainly 
they must be humble. But I do 
not want to see any difference be- 
tween the Fathers and Brothers, 
save the particular respect that 
the Brothers must show the Fathers 
as Priests. Whether we are well 
or sick we are all brothers and I 
would be greatly disturbed if I 
should see a brother less well cared 
for during his illness. Whoever 
does not love the Brothers does not 



277 



possess the spirit of the Congrega- 
tion." 

As a Postulant he learned to 
serve Mass, and to say the Com- 
munity prayers. 

"Ah those Latin prayers ! I have 
to repeat them a thousand times to 
remember them. I only know three 
of them: The Pater, Ave Maria, 
and 'We fly to thy patronage, 
Holy Mother of God.' I don't know 
a word of French yet, and I don't 
believe I ever will." 

Sept. 8, 1907, he was vested. The 
Novitiate Register says of him: 
"From the first days that Isidore 
De Loor was with us all the reli- 
gious were full of praise for the 
edifying conduct of this Brother 
whose humility, charity and accom- 
modation excited the admiration of 
all." 

As a Novice he learned how to 
make mental prayer. "Everyday, 
the Novices receive instruction for 
making progress in the spiritual 
life. For here we pray without 
using a book of prayers. Simply, 
from the depth of our heart we 
praise the greatness of God, we 
think of what we are ourselves ; 
we ask all the graces we need; 
we offer ourselves to God, etc. In 
the main it is not easy. Sometimes 
everything gets confused in my 
mind. Really, one day it goes fine, 
another day very badly. But I do 
not give up for that and I try 
again with renewed courage. We 
do the same before and after Com- 



munion. We have also an hour of 
meditation daily when we turn our 
thoughts to the Passion of Our 
Lord after which we examine our- 
selves from the point of view of 
our works, prayers, thoughts and 
desires. We see where we can do 
better, then make a good resolution 
and try to practice it. Thus it is 
that one makes really great prog- 
ress in the path of virtue." 

Fr. Sebastian, C.P. (later his 
Superior and Provincial) his Nov- 
ice Master's estimate: "Novitiate 
life is very difficult for a young 
man of the age and quality of 
Br. Isidore. 

Everything in the Monastery is 
new to him, coming as he does 
from a family of humble farmers. 
Indeed, in the Novitiate, the little 
trifles to observe are legion. 

Br. Isidore was bound to adapt 
himself perfectly to his new man- 
ner of life, and after a short time 
he could be cited as an example 
in choir, the refectory, or at work. 
He conformed himself with the 
greatest care to the least prescrip- 
tions of his Rule, to the least direc- 
tions or recommendations of his 
Superiors. 

Considering his age the difficulty 
was still more. His companions in 
the Novitiate were for the most 
part all young men aspiring to 
the priesthood, but in spite of that 
he easily accustomed himself to his 
new environment. He knew how to 
humble himself with the little ones. 



278 



He easily adapted himself, either 
in recreation or elsewhere to the 
character, the conversation, and 
even the impetuous temperament of 
youth. Br. Isidore knows how to 
win general sympathy. He was a 
friend of every one, welcome with 
everyone. He diffused around him 
the perfume of his virtue and 
preached by his good example. He, 
a simple lay-brother had a profound 
influence over the novices and 
trained them by his example in the 
ways of discipline and duty. His 
piety, his virtue, and his conversa- 
tion were not put on nor affected. 
Virtue was natural and attractive 
in him. He knew how to laugh 
good-naturedly, took part in the 
general merriment when someone 
told a joke; and willingly took 
the opportunity of telling some fun- 
ny incident to amuse his compan- 
ions. 

Brother was highly endowed by 
nature. He was a prudent young 
man, intelligent too. He assimilated 
without effort the teaching on mor- 
ality and the spiritual life. He 
practiced to perfection the method 
of prayer which he was taught; 
to such a degree that the other 
novices could be inspired by him 
when in chapter he developed the 
theme of his meditations in prepar- 
ation or thanksgiving for Holy 
Communion. It was edifying to 
hear the fitting sentiments which 
the simple lay-brother expressed 
when he talked with oGd. 



The same intelligence and tact 
were revealed in his work and in 
his everyday life. He worked with 
order and foresight and organized 
everything for the greatest good 
of the community. 

His sound judgment permitted 
him to discover the defects of his 
brothers in religion. (Human na- 
ture remains, even under the habit 
of a monk.) He asked their aid 
and advice in certain delicate cir- 
cumstances where his clearsighted- 
ness caught a glimpse, it is true, 
of human side of things, but his 
conscience rebelled. 

The following point merits atten- 
tion. One must not believe that 
Br. Isidore was one of those soft 
natures that turn at every wind 
or that seem to have virtue inborn. 
No, Br. Isidore became a virtuous 
religious by his consciousness of 
duty and his spirit of sacrifice, by 
his correction and his perfect mas- 
tery over himself. Virtue, sacrifice 
cost him and one could sometimes 
read in his face the interior strug- 
gle he was enduring to extinguish 
his pride and self-love. 

One time especially I tried Br. 
Isidore. I passed by the kitchen 
while he was working there. After 
some friendly words I departed and 
returned some moments later — why, 
I don't know. I saw him talking 
with the brother who was learning 
to cook and with whom he was 
permitted to speak. He smiled a 
little. As I did not often have the 



279 



occasion to humble him I seized this 
one by the hair and ordered the 
Brother to accuse himself publicly 
in the refectory. There in the pres- 
ence of all the religious I humbled 
him. I treated him as a hypo- 
crite. He could do wonderfully at 
being a little saint before his Su- 
periors but behind their back he 
amused himself and failed at his 
duties. That very morning I had 
clear proof that he abused his Su- 
periors and that we could not have 
confidence in him. It was a cruel 
and rough correction. 'To be a 
hypocrite,' 'to abuse his Superiors/ 
'not to merit their confidence :' that 
is crushing for a loyal and sincere 
religious. Big tears rolled down his 
cheeks, but no justification nor com- 
plaint came to his lips and he per- 
fectly fulfilled the penance imposed 
on him. He cried a lot that day. 
It was the tribute nature claimed; 
but he had the will to conquer 
himself." 

Sept. 1908 
Ere 
J.C.P. 
Jesus and Mary be praised 
forever and ever 
Dearest Parents, Brother and Sis- 
ter, 
God be praised, I have the hap- 
piness of writing you that Sunday 
a week from now Sept. 13, I will 
make my profession, consecrating 
myself to God, and binding myself 
body and soul to the Congregation 
by the vows I pronounce. They will 



detach me from my own personality 
and from all I possess in this world, 
even you, my dearest Parents, 
Brother, and Sister, who are, after 
God, the most precious things on 
earth. 

Thanks to the assurance of my 
spiritual director, my personal con- 
viction, and thanks also to the hap- 
piness and peace which I find in 
this life, I am going to take the 
great step which will decide my 
whole life. 

I do this only to accomplish the 
will of God entirely and to assure 
the salvation of my soul; to aid 
my neighbor by my prayers and ] 
to contribute to your spiritual and 
temporal welfare, my Parents, 
Brother, and Sister as also that of 
all my relations. 

In order to prepare for this im- j 
portant act and to accomplish it 
in the best dispositions we are I 
going on retreat in a few days to j 
raise our hearts to God by the 
exercises and prayer. We will ask 
Him for the strength to fulfill the 
duties of this state during our life 
with a sincere zeal. For this pur- 
pose I ask you also to say some 
Ave Marias daily until that great 
day and if possible all of you go 
to confession and communion once. 

My Father and Mother, you will 
probably come to be here at my 
profession, so we can thank Our 
Lord together for the great bene- 
fit He has accorded us, and we can 
(Continued on page 335) 



280 




£BLssed £f Lilian 

uYLaunoir: 
An Apostle of the Crucified 



BLESSED JULIAN MAUNOIR, S.J. 
was beatified May 20, 1951. 
This outstanding missionary was 
born October 1, 1606, at St. Georges 
-de-Reintembault, near Fougeres, 
France. The most successful years 
of his long life were spent among 
the people of Brittany. He died 
January 28, 1683, at Plevin (Cotes- 
du-Nord). We have no intention of 
giving here the details of the life 
and the fruitful apostolate of the 
new Beatus. It would be unfortu- 
nate, however, to ignore that which 
made both the one and the other 
the marvelous success that they 
were. For Blessed Julian was an 
apostle of the Passion of Christ. 
He made it his life, and he made 
it his ministry. That combination 
pays off every time — in personal 
sanctity and the salvation of souls! 
Blessed Julian's childhood is a 
vindication of Second Nocturns. As 



a boy, he loved to read and reread 
the Gospel accounts of the Passion 
of Our Lord. When Friday came 
around, he would line up all his 
little companions and march them 
off to Church. There he would 
mount the pulpit and lead his tiny 
charges in the recitation of speci- 
fied prayers. It is said of him that 
he could never recite the words of 
the Creed : "... He suffered . . . was 
crucified . . . died . . ." without burst- 
ing into tears. 

It is evident that the Passion of 
Christ must have well tempered 
the chosen soul of Blessed Julian 
long before he decided to enter the 
Company of Jesus. Nevertheless, 
the graces of the novitiate and the 
formation of a spiritual master 
soon channelled his spiritual forces 
into a definite pattern. His great 
devotion was the practice of the 
frequent thought of the Sufferings 

281 



of Our Lord. He decided, so reads 
his diary, "to work hard at trans- 
forming himself into Jesus Christ, 
by imitating Him in all things and 
at every moment, and especially in 
His sufferings." 

Elsewhere, it reads : "I heard an 
interior voice repeat four or five 
times: 'Ah, if you only knew, if 
you only knew!' The tone of awe 
made me understand how wonder- 
ful it is to cooperate with Jesus 
Christ in the salvation of souls. It 
gave me untold strength to follow 
my resolution to pursue Jesus 
Christ everywhere, in search for 
souls, to endure the greatest fa- 
tigue, to expose myself to the great- 
est dangers . . . for God is my 
strength. Since Our Lord has suf- 
fered so much, it is necessary that 
I, according to the measure of my 
grace, accept what suffering He 
pleases to send, without consolation, 
without impatience and without in- 
terrupting for a single moment the 
constant practice of the love of 
God." God would be, and God was 
his strength. "I am strong," he 
wrote, "with the strength that Our 
Lord has merited for me by His 
sufferings." 

His devotion to the Passion never 
lagged throughout the years that 
followed. On the vigil of his re- 
ception of Orders, the Divine Mas- 
ter spoke to him interiorly at the 
moment of his Communion. "How 
long I laboured for them; I wept, 
I suffered, I died for them!" And 



Blessed Julian cried out: "I can- 
not describe how those words pene- 
trated me. All the desire that I 
had heretofore felt mounted in such 
a crescendo that if it had been 
necessary to die at that moment 
in order to save one single soul, 
I would have done it with all my 
heart!" 

All the inevitable activitiy that 
came with being a missionary in i 
the Society — or in any order for 
that matter — seems never to have 
lessened the ardor with which 
Blessed Julian followed up his 
great love: the Passion of Christ. 
Even the unparalleled success of 
ministry — little short of phenom- 
enal — could not turn him, as it 
might do one of lesser stamp. Far 
from seeking his own glory in the 
long series of triumphs that he 
could not deny, he always answered 
with the words of St. Paul: "God 
does not will that I should glory 
save in the Cross of Jesus Christ." 

Knowing the value of suffering 
as a means to the apostolate, he had 
an insatiable longing for suffering. 
"I will suffer," he once wrote, "with 
patience every injurious word spok- 
en to me and every injurious thing 
done to me. I will look upon them 
as angels from heaven, sent to test 
me, to animate and purify my love." 
As one readily surmises, the enemy 
of all good was never far away — 
with his agents and instruments. 

The secret behind Blessed Juli- 
an's success on the Missions, next 



282 



to his personal holiness and the 
special inherent power of his favor- 
ite subject, seems to lie in the 
fact that he was a teacher. He 
possessed in a rare degree the qual- 
ities that make a successful instruc- 
tor. He was endowed with a very 
mild disposition, a charming per- 
sonality — one that attracted whom- 
ever it met and overcame with 
gracious simplicity, nobility and 
modesty. "He did not possess a 
towering intelligence," says the 
Abbe Bremond, in his Histoire du 
sentiment religieux. "We know that 
in his discourses he said nothing 
but what was most commonplace." 
Nevertheless, he knew his audience 
— it was a people that needed in- 
struction — and measured himself 
accordingly. When he spoke his face 
seemed to light up with eagerness 
and excitement. His voice took on 
power and unction. The picture 
that he made stole into the hearts 
of his listeners and was never 
effaced. 

To Blessed Julian the secret of 
his success, if there was any secret, 
was the subject on which he spoke 
most frequently: the continual re- 
membrance of the sufferings of Our 
Lord. Every day, on his missions, 
he taught the faithful to meditate 
on the sufferings of Christ. For 
this purpose, he composed a booklet 
entitled "The Temple consecrated 
to the Passion of the Lord," to- 
gether with hymns and a catechism 
on "The Prayer of the Heart," an 



expression that is still used in the 
Breton dialect to designate mental 
prayer. 

By this means he succeeded in 
forming the interior life even in 
the simple shepherds and shepherd- 
esses. "While watching their flocks, 
these straightforward souls would 
turn the depth of their heart into 
a kind of oratory. There they would 
spend the time thinking of the suf- 
ferings of their Saviour, and of the 
most sublime truths of religion." 
(Sejourne, Life of Ven. Pere Maun- 
oir, II, 253) 

His purpose was always the 
same : teach the people to meditate 
on the Passion. To this end the 
fervent missionary would divide a 
week's parish mission, or retreat, 
into seven stations, as he called 
them. On Sunday, it was Jesus 
praying in the Garden of Olives, 
falling into the terrifying agony 
that made Him sweat blood. Mond- 
day, it was the flagellation ; Tues- 
day, the crowning of Thorns ; 
Wednesday, the unjust condemna- 
tion to death. On Thursday, the 
sorrowful journey to Calvary; Fri- 
day, Christ's death upon the Cross, 
and Saturday, our Blessed Mother 
receiving into her arms the bruised 
body of her Divine Son. First of 
all, the preacher would urge his 
audience to form an actual picture 
of the scene, and there direct their 
thoughts and affections. Then, be- 
fore the reasonings of the mind 
might slow down the sentiments 



283 



of the heart, he immediately began 
to make a meditation out loud. This 
method, in accord with the rules 
laid down by the author of The 
Spiritual Exercises, was most suc- 
cessful. 

At other times he counselled his 
beloved people to kneel before the 
Crucifix, there detach themselves 
from every created thing, and speak 
to Jesus by the use of ejaculations. 
"My sweet Jesus, when I see your 
sufferings, I desire to do every- 
thing for love of You." "My sweet 
Jesus, hanging on the Cross, save 
my soul at the hour of death." 

He made use of every means to 
accomplish his purpose. He often 
exhorted his listeners to look at 
the Holy Face. "See that Head of 
your Divine Master crowned with 
thorns. See the tears running down 
his face. Why do you think our 
Divine Master weeps? Is it be- 
cause of the sufferings he under- 
goes? Alas, no! He would gladly 



endure a hundred times as much, 
for one single soul. The tears flow- 
ing down his cheeks are caused by 
obstinate sinners who refuse to re- 
pent. Always be devoted to that 
precious Blood, to those sacred 
tears . . . The evil spirit will have 
no power at the death of one who 
has been devoted to the sufferings 
of Christ." 

Yes, Blessed Julian Maunoir 
might be called the Apostle of Medi- 
tation on the Passion. He taught 
it everywhere, always. Very fitting- 
ly, his last words to those assembled 
around him were on the same sub- 
subject. "Adore our Suffering Lord, 
compassionate Him, thank Him for 
the love for men that he has proven 
by dying for them. Offer to suffer 
with Him, beseech Him not to al- 
low anyone to offend Him. Ask 
Him for the grace never to offend 
Him. Promise that you will serve 
Him until death, and beg Him for 
the grace to live up to so wonder- 
ful a promise." 



MORTIFICATION 

The important point is that we shall never become men of prayer, if we do 
not have a great love for internal and external mortification, and practice it. 
(Letters, IV, 293) 

Internal and external mortification are the wings that carry us to God in 
holy prayer. (I, 94) 

Internal and external mortification is the cornerstone of the spiritual edi- 
fice. (IV, 412) 

A love for penance is a great grace, provided it is without self-love. (II, 263) 

I would that your instruments of penance were great humility of heart, 
subjection and perfect obedience to your superiors, and even to your infer- 
iors What a solid foundation this is for building a great edifice of sanctity ! 

(Ill, 355) 



284 



niiiiiiiiiiiii 1 1 1 e 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 i 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 

OUT OF PR/NT 



Items of interest clipped from the Press" 
■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii ifiiiiiiii iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



FATHER VANCE IS HOME 

Father VANCE is home. He had 
performed wonderful works in 
China since he went there as a 
young missionary thirty years ago. 
He kept on doing good among his 
Chinese people until a combination 
of Communist orders and his own 
ill-health put a stop to his labors 
for the Lord in that vineyard. So, 
thanks be to God, he is now back 
home in the United States. His 
brothers and sisters, his other rela- 
tives, and his many friends, are 
praying that he will soon be com- 
pletely well again, to spread here 
the Gospel of love of God and love 
of neighbor which had enshrined 
him in the hearts of his people in 
China. 

John Vance and I were boys to- 
gether in South Philadelphia. We 
were classmates at St. Teresa's 
School at Broad and Catherine 
Streets. I was proud of him when 
he left to study for the priesthood. 
I was prouder of him when, under 
the religious name of Father Ra- 



phael, he was ordained a priest of 
the Passionist Order. It was a 
wrench when he departed from 
these shores as a member of the 




Rev. Fr. Raphael Vance, C.P. 



285 



first group of Passionists to estab- 
lish a mission in the Orient. 

I could never measure the bene- 
fits that have come to me through 
the weekly letters we have been 
exchanging for many years. My 
letters to him were full of trivial 
news, along with plenty of news- 
paper clips, to keep him acquainted 
with the doings in the old home 
town, the comings and goings of 
the neighbors and the neighbors' 
children. His letters to me, breath- 
ing faith and hope and love, have 
been a constant inspiration. 

Little hope was entertained for 
Father Raphael's recovery when he 
suffered a stroke last November. 
His Superior, Bishop O'Gara, who 
continued the weekly letters when 
Father Vance could neither write 
nor dictate, has since credited his 
come-back to the prayers of his 
hosts of friends here and in China. 

No passengers were to be taken 
aboard when the train stopped at 
North Philadelphia, but I was con- 
fident that, after several days in 
his company, the attendants would 
be inclined to allow a small group 
of us to say "hello," at least. It 
was better than that. Two of Fa- 
ther Vance's three sisters — Mary 
and Frances — and one of his two 
brothers — Bill— were allowed to 
ride to New York with him, along 
with Bill Duncan, of The Inquirer, 
and me. Two other friends greeted 
him at North Philadelphia— Dan 
Fitzgerald, another buddy of the 



St. Teresa schooldays, and John 
Cleary, my associate at Public Fed- 
eral. Regrettably, another sister — 
Anne — and another brother — Jim — 
could not be there that morning. 

At the door of his car, No. 287 — 
a figure I shall never forget — the 
porter told us Father Vance was 
waiting to see us. And at the door 
of the compartment, I was greeted 
by name by a priest I had never 
met before — Father Quentin, Fa-I 
ther Vance's successor as superior 
in China, who had accompanied 
him over the 11,000 mile journey 
home. 

Although propped up on his 
couch, Father Vance seemed like 
his old spirited, vigorous self. The 
seven of us enjoyed an Old Home 
Week reunion. Father Vance was] 
thankful for the messages and flow- 
ers that welcomed him in San Fran- 
cisco. The flowers I wired him he: 
had placed in St. Mary's Chapel 
there for my intention. He remem-< 
bered to congratulate the two 1951! 
graduates in our family — Nancy j 
and John. He was thankful to Fa- 
ther Donnelly for his timely letter. 
In expressing his appreciation for: 
Lou Jaffe's radiogram, he said hei 
had learned the lesson of patience 
from Lou, who had set so fine ani 
example of bearing up under afflic- 
tion. 

At Penn Station in New York, 
we were the center of a reception i 
which I shall not attempt to de-j 
scribe. Fifteen priests of the Pas- 



286 



sionist Order were there, together 
with two nuns who were nurses, 
a lay nurse, two doctors, and an 
ambulance at the end of the plat- 
form. As he was being carried out 
on the stretcher, Father Vance, his 
eyes filled with tears of joy, waved 
and greeted all his friends. 

Camera men with their flash 
bulbs and reporters with their copy 
paper were on hand from all the 
New York dailies and the news 
services, to welcome him home. 

Father Vance was taken to St. 
Joseph's Hospital, in Paterson, N. 
J., which is close to the Mother- 
house of the Passionist Order in 
Union City, N. J. 

When Father Vance was enjoy- 
ing one of his three furloughs in 
the United States, in 1946, we had 
a reunion of the 1909 Class of St. 
Teresa's School. The affair was 
held after business hours in our 
own Public Federal Building. Of 
the 42 members of that class, 32 
were present and this was the first 
time any attempt had been made 
to get them together. 

I have often been asked why Fa- 
ther Vance wanted to spend so 
much of his life in China, and I 
have always thought it was because 
of his obedience to the command- 
ment, 'Thou shalt love the Lord 
thy God with thy whole soul and 
with thy whole heart, and with thy 
whole mind, and thy neighbor as 
thyself, for the love of God." And 
his neighbors were the underprivi- 



leged Chinese, to whom he minis- 
tered as a young missionary. 

John Rigney, President, 
Public Federal Savings 
and Loan Association. 
(Reprinted from Diary and Note- 
book, July, 1951, Public Federal 
Savings and Loan Association, 
Philadelphia, Pa.) 



RED FOES INSIDE CHINA 
CRUSHED, PRIEST SAYS 

Rebellion against the Commun- 
ist regime in China will never 
come from within the borders of 
China, the Rev. Francis L. Flaherty, 
Cincinnati priest, said Friday. 

"If the present regime is over- 
thrown, the opposition must come 
from outside China," he said. 

"The active opponents of Com- 
munism in China have been purged, 
killed mercilessly in public market 
places. News reports say over 
1,000,000 Chinese have been slaugh- 
tered since last year. The opposi- 
tion has been disarmed, purged, or 
driven from China. There is no 
chance of rebellion." 

Father Flaherty returned to Cin- 
cinnati this week. He was forced 
to leave China last July 12. He is 
the son of Mrs. Sallie Woll Flaherty 
and the late Timothy Flaherty of 
312 Warner Street, Clifton Heights. 

He is a member of the Passionist 
Fathers who have their headquar- 
ters at the Holy Cross Monastery on 
Mt. Adams. 



287 



He went to China as a missionary 
in 1928, and remained there except 
for two furloughs in 1935 and 1946. 
His mission was at the city of 
Supir, in the Yuanling diocese. This 
is located in the Hunan province 
in central China. 

"The persecution of the Catholic 
Church began in January," he said. 

"It was a subtle, indirect attack 
at first. They did such things as 
closing off all but two rooms of our 
rectory. They controlled the money, 
and made it almost impossible for 
us to buy necessities. 

"Police patrols entered the rec- 
tory eight and ten times a day. 
They broke into church in the midst 
of Mass, and drove the parishioners 
from the church. They threatened 
our people with death. 

"Finally, they put Bishop Cuth- 
bert M. O'Hara of Canada and 
Vicar General Paul Ubinger of 
Pittsburgh in jail July 1. They still 
are there. 

"There are twelve Americans and 
one Canadian still at the mission. 
The constant propaganda and terror 
is only against Americans. No men- 
tion is made of other nations, even 
Great Britain. The people them- 
selves have no heart for this Com- 
munism. But they are helpless, 
without arms. 

Father Flaherty said he was not 
molested when he made arrange- 
ments to leave China. 

"The Communists were glad to 
see me go," he said. "They'd like 



all missionaries to leave, so they 

could set up state-controlled 

churches. 

{The Cincinnati Post, Oct. 12,1951) 



"I WAS A MONK" 

"I WAS A MONK": the auto- 
biography of John Tettemer. 
Edited by Janet Mabie. Knopf. 
Review by David Bulman, C.P., 
in AMERICA, Sept. 29, 1951. 

Thomas MERTON, writing of hif 
present love in Gethsemani, has 
penned no more glowing praise o1 
Cistercian life than has John Tet- 
temer of the Passionist life he onc< 
knew and had long since lost. Per- 
haps it is nostalgia, homesickness 
that makes these reminiscences S( 
very pathetic. For John Tettemer 
who died in 1949, was an apostat* 
from the Faith, an ex-monk wh( 
freely left his Order, joined th< 
Liberal Catholics, was made a bish- 
op among them, left them, ran a 
wine shop in California, obtainec 
small parts in movies (he was the 
grand Lama in Lost Horizon) and 
of course, married. A month be- 
fore he died of cancer, he was 
visited by a former classmate o: 
Roman days in his cottage in Bever- 
ly Hills. To this priest friend he 
manifested no remorse, no regret. 
He died unreconciled to the Church 
he praises in this strange book. 

I call this book strange, for it is 
inconceivable that a man in his 
declining years could write so lov- 
ingly of both the Church and the 



288 



Order he left, and yet willingly 
die outside their fold. For thirteen 
out of fifteen chapters John Tet- 
temer, the one time Father Ilde- 
fonso, writes an apologia, not for 
himself, but for the Catholic Church 
and the Passionist Congregation. 
He tells of his birth in St. Louis 
and early years in a few pages. The 
rest is the account of his career 
as a seminarian and a priest. The 
two high spots are his pronouncing 
of vows in religion with the oath 
of perseverance and the moment of 
ordination to the priesthood. Of this 
latter, he says simply: "It was 
the supreme moment of my life." 
In the final two chapters, Tet- 
temer tells of his defection. And 
the language he uses is strange 
indeed for a convinced fallen-away. 
He speaks of his "loss of faith," 
of his negligence before temptation 
("Had I realized at this time that 
my faith was in danger, I should 
doubtless have prayed and turned 
my mind definitely away from my 
day-dreaming,") of the "final de- 
bacle" when all was lost. 

Father Ildefonso was a brilliant 
philosopher. In his later years of 
Roman teaching, he became more 
inclined to Platonism, rejected the 
Church's use of Aristotelian term- 
inology in theological phraseology. 
He became quite interested in spir- 
itualism. Meanwhile, though still a 
young man, his advancement in 
Rome was flatteringly rapid. Con- 
suitor to several papal congrega- 



tions, he was even offered a bish- 
opric. But since it was in Bulgaria, 
he refused. Success met him at 
every turn — and then, health crum- 
bled. Threatened with tuberculosis, 
he was sent to Switzerland. For 
six months there he lay supine, able 
to do nothing but contemplate. 

In that heady atmosphere, he be- 
gan to feel close to God. He began 
to think that men might experience 
God without the nuisance of creeds. 
He pondered more on spiritualism. 
He concluded that the seemingly 
diabolical phenomena were merely 
natural. And if miracles are not 
supernatural, then the very source 
Christ pointed to in confirmation 
of His teaching was only as yet un- 
known natural phenomena. There- 
fore, we have no guarantee that 
what Christ taught or what His 
Church teaches is true. Fr. Ilde- 
fonso never came back to his Order 
or to his Church. 

There the book ends. No mention 
is made of his subsequent creedal 
affiliations. No mention of his ra- 
ther uncontemplative later years. 

One cannot help wonder just why 
this book was published. John Tet- 
temer is a name unknown to most 
Americans. His story, only half- 
told both chronological (it ends a- 
round 1916) and definitively (it 
tells nothing of his flirtation with 
other creeds,' is annoyingly un- 
satisfactory. There is nothing sen- 
sational, nothing Maria Monk would 
(Continued on page 340) 



289 



GENERAL STATISTICS OF THE 



Province Priests 

Presentation 161 

(Italy) 
Sorrowful Mother 128 

(Italy) 
Pieta 112 

(Italy) 
St. Joseph 109 

(England) 
St. Paul of the Cross 388 

(U.S.A.) 
St. Michael 27 

(France) 
Sacred Heart 147 

(Spain) 
Heart of Mary 182 

(Italy) 
Immaculate Conception 44 

(Argentina) 
Side of Christ 68 

(Italy) 
Holy Family 98 

(Spain) 
Holy Cross 205 

(U.S.A.) 
St. Gabriel 138 

(Belgium) 
Holy Spirit 46 

(Australia) 
Precious Blood 98 

(Spain) 
Holy Hope 99 

(Holland) 
Calvary 45 

(Brazil) 
St. Patrick 133 

(Ireland) 
Five Wounds 16 

(Germany) 
Vice-Province of 16 

Poland 

Generalate 

Totals 2260 



Students 


Brothers 


Total 


Novices 


15 


50 


226 


14 


12 


38 


178 


— 


18 


41 


171 


10 


27 


18 


154 


12 


99 


36 


523 


24 


— 


4 


31 


2 


62 


71 


280 


26 


26 


67 


275 


7 


12 


9 


65 


— 


14 


29 


111 


8 


32 


37 


167 


25 


37 


29 


271 


14 


25 


37 


200 


1 


8 


13 


67 


4 


35 


40 


173 


7 


29 


35 


163 


12 


26 


9 


80 


8 


39 


29 


201 


10 


3 


5 


24 


2 


5 


13 


34 


12 



524 



610 



3394 



198 



THE PRIEST'S LIFE— THE MASS 

"A priest's life revolves around the Mass, and each Mass is an event that will 
rank among the greatest achievements and divinest glories of the God of love. 
Heaven will grow old and eternity with fade, before the memory of one Mass 
shall be forgotten by God! Nothing in history is so appallingly God-like as the 
condescension which marks the coming of God to a soul in Holy Communion. 
The creation of a thousand worlds is but the echo of a passing word, the Mass 



290 







/Ul/UA*. 



VA 
u^ 






(,^0 



CONGREGATION JANUARY, 1951 



Prep Students 


Retreats 


Missions 


Public Exercises 


Private Exercises 


169 


13 


40 


70 


35 


65 


11 


75 


32 


34 


108 


11 


62 


44 


30 


29 


10 


37 


1 


131 


100 


12 


559 


2492 


841 


18 


3 


5 


9 


21 


94 


11 


110 


301 


102 


121 


12 


76 


135 


85 


30 


6 


85 


19 


26 


67 


7 


144 


8 


22 


100 


16 


64 


58 


66 


69 


11 


266 


275 


181 


148 


9 


28 


56 


129 


11 


5 


51 


38 


81 


89 


11 


109 


90 


41 


154 


5 


20 


125 


30 


95 


7 


60 


7 


46 


36 


8 


81 


206 


48 


23 


3 


6 


10 


8 


17 


3 

2 


6 


32 


3 


1543 


176 


1884 


4008 


1960 



is the unbloody sacrifice of the Body and Blood of the Eternal Son of God!... 
Who understands and appreciates better than the priest that the earth has 
no greater gift to bestow on a man, and that God, with all his riches could do 
no more for any man than communicate to him His own power to perform the 
most stupendous of miracles: the changing of bread and wine into His own 
Body and Blood. "Do ye this in commemoration of Me." 

— Fr. Ignatius Conroy, C.P., Sermon for Golden Jubilee of Fr. Charles ('assidy, 
C.P. 



291 




PASSIONIST NEWS REVIEW 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 



Provincial Curia 



Very Reverend Fr. Provincial, C.P. 
5700 North Harlem Avenue 
Chicago 31, Illinois 
TO ALL BRETHREN OF THE 
HOLY CROSS PROVINCE: 

A hundred years ago in Italy, plans 
and preparations for the extension 
of the Congregation to America were 
in progress. That was the age that 
gave Venerable Dominic to England 
and our own saintly founding Fa- 
thers to America. These were really 
great Passionists and great Mission- 
aries. Their work merits our admira- 
tion and our reverent gratitude; their 
example should be our inspiration. 

Now, on the eve of our Centenary, 
we in Holy Cross Province have felt 
the urge and impulse of that same 
life-bearing missionary Spirit, the in- 
spiration to give of our substance — 
our Men and our means — that the 



Kingdom of Christ Crucified may be 
extended. 

From many and diverse sources, 
we hear it reported that the Japanese 
people, now in the process of post- 
war recovery and readjustment, are 
wonderfully well-disposed toward the 
message of Christianity. The Holy 
See, recognizing in this concurrence 
of favorable circumstances the Hand 
and design of Divine Providence, is 
desirous of sending many Mission- 
aries into this field. Hence, it has 
most earnestly commended this Apos- 
tolate to various Missionary Orders 
and Societies. 

Thus, in June 1950, Bishop Taguchi, 
of Osaka, Japan, was directed to con- 
tact our Father General in order to 
obtain Passionist Missionaries for Ja- 
pan. In turn, Most Reverend Father 
General commended this Apostolate 



292 



especially to the American Provinces. 
In this way, the invitation came to 
our Province to undertake Missionary 
work in Japan. This proposal was 
presented to the Capitular Fathers 
at our last Provincial Chapter. The 
Fathers received this invitation fa- 
vorably, and, as is recorded in the 
Acts of the Chapter, a recommenda- 
tion was made "that the Provincial 
Curia investigate the feasibility of 
accepting a mission field in Japan." 
This recommendation was acted upon 
and each avenue of investigation 
seemed to lend a more favorable as- 
pect to the proposed Apostolate in 
Japan. In this connection, I wish to 
make special mention and acknowl- 
edgment of the warm encouragement, 
wise counsel and practical sugges- 
tions most cordially extended to us 
by Bishop Lane, Superior General of 
Maryknoll, and the Members of his 
Council. 

After these preliminary investiga- 
tions, the next step seems to be per- 
sonal contact and first-hand knowl- 
edge of the proposed Mission Field. 
Bishop Lane was particularly em- 
phatic in his endorsement of our de- 
cision to make no commitments with- 
out first visiting the area, or various 
possible areas, and examining and 
exploring the conditions under which 
the Missionaries will have to work. 
Therefore the Curia decided that I 
should go to Japan as soon as feasi- 
ble. 

In view of the fact that Very Rev. 
Fr. Malcolm had been delegated to 
make the General Visitation and 
preside at the Provincial Chapter in 
Australia, we considered it highly 
advantageous to request him to in- 



clude Japan in his itinerary. Thus it 
came about that arrangements were 
made for Father Malcolm and my- 
self to leave San Francisco on Oc- 
tober 26 via Pan American Airways. 
After a stop-over at Honolulu, we will 
arrive at Tokyo on October 31 (Octo- 
ber 30, stateside). Father Malcolm 
has allowed two weeks for his stay in 
Japan, during which time we will 
contact the various ecclesiastical and 
Civil authorities and explore the sev- 
eral districts which are open to us 
for Missionary work. After Father 
Malcolm leaves for Australia, I ex- 
pect to remain on in Japan to follow 
up the contacts which we will have 
made. If all goes well, I hope to be 
back in the United States about mid- 
December. 

It seems unnecessary and inade- 
quate to say that this new apostolic 
venture is one of tremendous im- 
portance for our Province. It will 
directly affect the lives of some of 
our Religious; it will be an added 
financial obligation, and much more 
a spiritual responsibility to the Pro- 
vince. It is an undertaking in which 
we need to be guided not merely by 
human prudence and wisdom, but by 
the Holy Spirit Who alone can ani- 
mate and fructify the true apostolate. 
In order that our deliberations and 
decisions may be enlightened and 
inspired by the Holy Spirit of Truth 
and Love, I earnestly ask each mem- 
ber of the Province to pray fervently 
for this intention and to support these 
prayers with a spirit of generous 
sacrifice. From October 24 to Decem- 
ber 7 inclusive, the following prayers 
will be said in each of the Commu- 
nities of the Province: 



293 



1. The "Veni Creator" with versiclep 
and prayer. f| 

2. The Litany of Loretto with ver-p 
side and prayer. M 

3. One "Pater," "Ave" and "Glo-1 
ria," with proper antiphon, ver-j 
sicle and prayer, in honor of our | 
Holy Patrons: St. Michael, St.| 
Joseph, Our Holy Founder, St. 
Gabriel and St. VinGent Mary 
Strambi. 

Thus through the united prayers o 
the Brethren and the intercession ofp 
our heavenly Patrons, we will con- 
fidently hope for the blessing of God| 
upon this undertaking to bring the| 
knowledge and love of Christ to the[ 
Japanese. 

Finally, as of October 18 and forj 
the duration of my absence from the 
country, Very Reverend Father NeiljS 
will be delegated to act with full Pro- 1 * 
vincial authority in the administra- « 
tion of the Province. 

Asking God's Blessing upon each 
member of the Province, I am, 

Sincerely in Christ, 

James Patrick of the Passion, C.P. 
Provincial. 



Scheduled to fly to Japan Oct. 
19th, is the Very Rev. James 
P. White, C.P., Chicago Provincial 
of the American Passionist Fathers 
of Western United States. He plans 
to establish a mission for the Cath- 
olic Passionist Order in Japan. He 
will be accompanied by the Very 
Rev. Malcolm LaVelle, C.P., Con- 
suitor General of the Order. Mem- 
bers of the Passionist order have 
done outstanding work in China for 



the past 25 years and up to the 
present Chinese regime. The Most 
Rev. Cuthbert O'Gara, C.P., Pas- 
sionist Bishop of the Diocese of 
Yuanling, is now held a prisoner 
by the Chinese Reds. 

(Reprinted from "Stars and 
Stripes.") 

CROWDS estimated at 6,000 took 
part in a colorful procession 
sponsored by the Archdiocese of 
Tokyo on the afternoon of Sunday, 
Nov. 4, at St. Ignatius Church, 
Yotsuya. Officiating prelate was the 
Most Rev. Peter Doi, Archbishop 
of Tokyo, who was assisted by the 
Rt. Rev. Vincent, S.D.B., former 
Prefect Apostolic of Miyazaki, as 
deacon, the Rev. Luke Arai, Vicar- 
General of Tokyo as subdeacon, 
and the Rev. John Repplinger, S.J. 
as master of ceremonies. Prominent 
among the Canopy bearers was 
Akira Matsui, secretary of Prime 
Minister Yoshida. 

With school and parochial ban- 
ners waving in the breeze, the pro- 
cession wended its way from the 
church through the streets to So- 
phia University athletic field where 
an altar had been erected. 

After the first Benediction the 
procession returned to St. Ignatius 
Church where another altar was 
erected. 

Among the distinguished foreign 
visitors attending the ceremony 
were the Very Rev. Gilbert Morin, 
Provincial of the Canadian Redemp- 



294 



-Li 



torists, the Very Rev. James Pat- 
rick White, Provincial of the Pas- 
sionist Fathers who just arrived 
from Chicago, and the Very Rev. 
Malcolm LaVelle, Assistant Super- 
ior General of the Passionist Fa- 
thers who came from Rome a few 
days ago. 

(Reprinted from the Nippon 
Times, Tokyo, Tue. Nov. 6, 1951.) 



The Office of the Provincial has 
also directed the following communi- 
cation to the Brethren of the Pro- 
vince. It is the review of the recent 
book "I Was a Monk," a posthumous 
publication purporting to tell the life 
story of the former Fr. Ildephonsus 
Tettemer, C.P. 

"I WAS A MONK" 

Edited by Janet Mabie. Published 

by Knopf. Reviewed by Fr. Joseph 

Mary O'Leary, C.P. 

This book is published as "The Au- 
tobiography of John Tettemer," but 
credit is given to Janet Mabie "for 
bringing the manuscript to light and 
for her patient, capable understand- 
ing work as its editor." The editor 
took the "unfinished manuscript" and 
shaped it into the present book with 
the advice and assistance of Tette- 
mer's widow." 

No indication is given that enables 
one to determine exactly what John 
Tettemer actually wrote. In place 
of such a necessary editorial fore- 
word, we have a romantic foreword 
by Jean Burden, and a brief, enthusi- 
astic introduction by John Burton. 
Neither piece adds anything to the 
value of the book. 

Thirteen of the fifteen chapters 



(four- fifths of the book) are devoted 
to the narrative of John Tettemer's 
vocation and life as a Passionist re- 
ligious: novice, student and priest. 
For the most part, the narrative is 
frank and honest, understanding and 
sympathetic. There are no "sensa- 
tional revelations or embittered con- 
troversy"; full tribute is paid to the 
Passionist ideal, and to its living 
reality in the true and good religious 
men whom Father Ildephonsus knew 
and loved. 

There is, however, a striking re- 
currence of the first personal pro- 
noun; a recurrence that is not neces- 
sary to the nature or the purpose of 
the narrative. A certain egoism or 
self-complacency intrudes itself ever 
so often in criticisms of customs, in- 
stitutions and persons. 

Here and there, we find instances 
of questionable and bad taste. One 
flagrant lapse, if pointed out, would 
only add further pain. At times, the 
author is talkative and gossipy; and, 
in consequence, he is occasionally led 
into a betrayal of the trust that was 
implicit in the offices committed to 
him. Silence in such matters is de- 
manded by tradition, ethics and cour- 
tesy. 

Questions of Catholic dogmatic and 
moral theology are handled out of 
context, or without the necessary 
precision. An air of arrogance or flip- 
pancy is not always avoided; some 
places are irrelevant to the author's 
purpose. Misspellings and errors of 
fact suggest incompetence in either 
writer or editor. 

Chapters fourteen and fifteen show 
"the advent and growth of doubt" 
about the author's religious creed. He 



295 



says: "I am not interested in defend- 
ing, only in relating as clearly as I 
am able the stages I went through 
during this period." He admits that 
he is at a loss to find many of the 
roots of this doubt." 

He is aware, however, that for 
many years there must have been 
"a strong leaning toward a philoso- 
phy diametrically opposed to the du- 
alism upon which historic Christiani- 
ty is built." He sees the possibility in 
himself of "an innate leading (sic) 
to some concept of monism." Indeed, 
he says: "I always had a secret ad- 
miration for the arguments of the 
monists, and for the magnificent uni- 
ty that monism brought into a very 
confusing world." As he writes, he 
feels sure that in his earlier years as 
a teacher of theology there had been 
sown in him "seeds of doubt in the 
power of our minds to know ultimate 
truth, and doubt in the validity of 
all known systems of human philoso- 
phy." 

During a period of rest in the Swiss 
mountains, allowed to him by con- 
siderate superiors, he engaged in 
what he terms "detached contempla- 
tion." The critical results were two: 
first, the loss of "faith in the power 
of the human mind to know Truth 
about the Ultimate"; second, "the 
loss of my faith in orthodox or dog- 
matic religion of any and whatever 
forms." 

He falls back on a claim to "highly 
sensitized contemplation" of "hori- 
zons of insight," and upon "sharp- 
ened intuitions concerning the na- 
ture of things." To him, now, the 
mind is "of little real and no per- 
manent value"; there is a higher part 



of man's being beyond his mind 
which is the subject of the divine 
element of religion. 

Ultimately he comes to believe that 
all consciousness is one. The sense of 
the "I" is the great illusion of man- 
kind. "Losing one's own personality 
in that of a larger consciousness 
which we may call God, or on the way 
to God, is in the right direction." He 
is willing to prophesy that at some 
future, perhaps far-off day "person- 
ality will be found to be rightly pre- 
dicated only of God, and not of our- 
selves." Out of all this, he is con- 
tent to say: "God is: I am not." 

There is nothing at all new in the 
theories of John Tettemer. Anyone 
acquainted with certain modern phil- 
osophers, with Oriental mysticism 
and with Modernism has seen all 
this before. In spite of the author's 
insistence on his profound study of 
Scholastic philosophy and theology, 
especially of Aristotle and St. Thom- 
as, there is no evidence at all in this 
volume that he ever really mastered 
his Catholic sources. He says nothing 
here about the literary and personal 
influences that were influencing his 
thinking before he left his monastery. 

It is very regrettable that this vol- 
ume comes heralded as the work of 
one "completely without vanity"; of 
one "who writes with compelling di- 
rectness, modesty and integrity." 
Such claims simply force upon us the 
reply that the text does not bear out 
the author's modesty and lack of 
vanity. Prowess in athletics and in 
academic pursuits; success and fu- 
ture prospects as student and priest 
are clearly indicated — "first" and 
"gifted" and "natural born." Dwarf- 



296 



ing Plato and Aristotle to pygmy- 
like stature in comparison with in- 
dividual and subjective experience is 
not modesty. Intellectual weariness 
and loneliness, and an easy accept- 
ance of "what was good enough for 
Francis of Assisi and Thomas of 
Aquino" does not explain conver- 
sions of such men as G. K. Chester- 
ton. Let readers determine for them- 
selves whether G. K. Chesterton has 
no claim to be numbered with the 
"mental and active types." 

To this reviewer, who knew Father 
Ildephonsus intimately, who loved 
him deeply, who prayed for him to 
the end, who acknowledges personal 
indebtedness to him, the book is sad 
and unfortunate. 

Finally, the publishers are guilty of 
a grave injustice in reproducing the 
honored and loved Passionist habit 
on the jacket of a book that was not 
written by a "distinguished member 
of the Passionist Order." 

This autobiography is represented 
as "an adventure in faith." Such a 
designation is misleading to say the 
least. The thirteen chapters, which 
tell the story of John Tettemer's life 
as a boy and as a Passionist religious 
may truly be designated "an adven- 
ture in faith." The subsequent chap- 
ters, presented as the climactic de- 
velopment of John Tettemer's re- 
ligious experience, should rather be 
termed "the final debacle" in one 
man's loss of faith "in orthodox or 
dogmatic religion of any and what- 
ever form." 

In the judgment of this reviewer, 
this is not a great book or an import- 
ant book. Catholics will derive no 



profit from the reading of this auto- 
biography. 

SACRA PAENITENTIARIA APOS- 

TOLICA 

OFFICIUM DE INDULGENTIIS 

Beatissime Pater, 

Procurator Generalis Congregatio- 
ns a Passione Jesu, ad pedes Sancti- 
tatis Tuae provolutus, humiliter petit 
Indulgentias quae sequuntur: 

1. Partialem trecentorum dierum a 
Sodalibus praedictae Congregationis 
saltern corde contrito lucrandam quo- 
ties invocationem "Passio Domini 
Nostri Jesu Christi sit semper in cor- 
dibus nostris" devote recitaverint; 
2. Plenariam suetis conditionibus, se- 
mel in mense ab ipsis acquirendam si 
quoties per integrum mensem eamden 
recitationem pie persolverint. 

Et Deus, etc. 

Die 11 Augusti, 1951 



SACRA PAENITENTIARIA 

APOSTOLICA, VI FACULTATUM A 
SSMO. D.N. PIO Pp. XII sibi tribu- 
tarum benigne annuit pro gratia jux- 
ta preces ad septennium. 
Contrariis non obstantibus quibus li- 
bet. 

N. Card. Canali, 

Paenitentiarius Major, 
S.Rossi a Secretis. 
Concordat cum originali. 



CHICAGO 

Immaculate Conception Retreat 

had the pleasure of a week's visit by 
Very Rev. Fr. Malcolm, C.P., First 
General Consultor. Father Malcolm 
arrived September 19th, for his first 
major stop in the journey that is to 
take him around to world on busi- 



297 



ness of the Congregation. Father's 
work will take him to Australia for 
a Visitation and Provincial Chapter. 
En route, he will spend some time in 
Japan, together with Very Rev. Fr. 
James Patrick, C.P., Provincial, in- 
vestigating the feasibility of opening 
a new mission field there. Very Rev. 
Fr. Provincial left this Retreat on 
October 19th. He will join Fr. Mal- 
colm in California, and the two will 
fly to Japan October 26th. 



hoped that the final work will be com- 
pleted soon. 



August saw us host once again to 
two Japanese seminarians. Likewise, 
from the Diocese of Osaka, the See of 
Bishop Taguchi, the two young men 
were making their way to Montreal 
to begin their study of Philosophy. 
Rev. Mr. Francis Hayashi, one of an- 
other group of Japanese seminarians 
who stopped off at Immaculate Con- 
ception Retreat on their way to Bal- 
timore, last winter, has written to 
tell that he hopes to translate the life 
of St. Paul of the Cross into his na- 
tive language, as an expression of 
his gratitude for our kindness during 
his stay. 



The annual Summer School of 
Catholic Action was held from Au- 
gust 27 to September 1 at the Mor- 
rison Hotel, in Chicago. Rev. Fr. 
Godfrey, C.P., the only non-Jesuit on 
the faculty, delivered lectures on Vo- 
cational and Marriage Guidance 
which were well attended. 



The new garage, reported in the 
last issue of The Passionist as in the 
planning stage, is now about half 
completed. A great deal of time was 
lost waiting for brick-layers. It is 



CINCINNATI 

Holy Cross Monastery, on August 
11th, noted the departure of Rev. Fr. 
Charles Guilfoyle, C.P. For the past 
several years, Fr. Charles has done 
outstanding work in inaugurating the 
Passionist Lay Retreat Movement in 
Cincinnati. One of the men of the 
St. Paul of the Cross Laymen's Re- 
treat League, a close friend of Fr. 
Charles and an energetic worker in 
promoting the movement, asked Fr. 
Charles if he would sing a High Mass 
in the Church for his intention, Sat- 
urday, Aug. 11. It was to be a sur- 
prise. In the meantime letters were 
sent to the Retreatants informing 
them of the Mass and requesting 
their presence as a surprise gift for 
Fr. Charles. 

Approximately 400 Retreatants as- 
sembled in the Church that morning. 
Shortly before the beginning of Mass, 
as Fr. Charles was vesting, the voices 
of all 400 thundered forth with the 
strains of the Retreat hymn made 
famous here by Father Charles — 
"Christ the King." 

Nearly the entire group of men re- 
ceived Holy Communion and offered 
it to Christ the King in appreciation 
and gratitude for all that Fr. Charles 
had done for them. It was a unique 
tribute to Fr. Charles' zeal and popu- 
larity. 

After the Mass, Fr. Wilfrid, the 
new Director of Retreats, spoke to 
the men. After him, Fr. Charles ex- 
pressed his gratitude to the men, 
during his short talk stressing the 
point that the greatest thing in the 



298 



world was to take sin out of the 
world, as Christ had done — "Agnus 
Dei." 

After the ceremonies in the 
Church, Fr. Charles met the men in 
the yard and bid farewell to each of 
them individually. He was presented 
a purse by the men for the further- 
ance of the Retreat Movement. Dur- 
ing the last few weeks, as the news 
of Fr. Charles' transfer was learned, 
he received many, many tokens of 
their appreciation. Father Charles 
deserved every bit of the tribute the 
men paid him, for he certainly per- 
formed a tremendous and creditable 
job in making the Retreat Movement 
a success in the Cincinnati area. He 
was untiring in his efforts to help the 
men, not only when they were on 
Retreat, but at all other times when 
they were in need. He never failed 
when called upon for help. 



Commissions — De Personis (De Cleri- 
cis, De Religiosis et De Laicis). 



Archbishop Alter recently an- 
nounced that studies would be under- 
taken in preparation for a Synod 
which is to be convoked within the 
next few years. Synodal legislation 
has not been reviewed for the last 
30 years. Since conditions have 
changed and new problems have 
arisen, a review of Synodal legisla- 
tion is indicated. 

Synodal officials and commissions 
have already been appointed. The 
Commissions are to prepare recom- 
mendations of the entire clergy body, 
in statutory form. Conferences are 
to be held periodically in each Dean- 
ery. The Committees are to meet 
every two weeks. Rev. Fr. Cyprian 
Frank, C.P., Pastor of Immaculata, 
is a member of one of the Special 



The opening of the Laymen's Re- 
treats has been very successful, again 
this year. The new Director, Fr. 
Wilfrid, and the Retreat Master, Fr. 
Angelo, have been well pleased with 
the results. The number of retreat- 
ants has been gratifying. 

A few minor changes in the sched- 
ule have been introduced. The Re- 
treats now close with the evening 
meal at 6 P.M. on Sunday. Instead of 
the Rosary Procession, the Retreat- 
ants assemble in the Grotto and say 
the entire Rosary there. The Mass 
on Saturday morning is celebrated 
in the Grotto of our Blessed Mother. 



The Clergy Days of Recollection, 
for the priests from Purcell, Elder 
and De Porres High Schools, were 
renewed again this year. The first 
in the series was held October 17, 
and conducted by Rev. Fr. Wilfrid, 
C.P. The remaining Days through- 
out the year will be conducted by 
Rev. Fr. Angelo, C.P. 



Rev. Fr. Francis Flaherty, C.P., 

recently returned from our Chinese 
Missions has been made a member 
of this Community. Father Francis 
was featured in articles in the Catho- 
lic Telegraph Register and also in 
the Cincinnati Post. In recounting 
the persecution that is raging in 
China against the Catholic Church, 
Father also said that "if the present 
regime is overthrown, the opposition 
must come from outside China." 



The Alms and Doepke Department 



299 



Store recently featured a display and 
sale of Rev. Fr. Raphael's pamphlets 
in their Bookshop. The company 
wrote Father Raphael, requesting a 
number of copies of his various works 
for the display. 



Holy Cross Monastery has been re- 
painted on the outside. All the wood 
and metal work on the outside of the 
building has received a new coat of 
paint. The results have been a sur- 
prise to all. 

Among other repairs, the old gate 
at the entrance to the driveway has 
been widened, thus providing needed 



room for vehicles to enter the 
grounds. 

The Community was happy to wel- 
come Rev. Fr. Aurelius back from 
Chicago, and to see him looking so 
much improved in health. Brother 
William underwent an operation re- 
cently, at St. Mary's Hospital, for the 
removal of a spur from his heel. 
Brother is home once again, and 
hopes soon to be able to return to 
work. Brother James also spent a 
few days in the hospital — for tests 
and X-ray treatments for ulcers. He 
returned with the good news that the 




Rev. Fr. Charles Cassidy, C.P. (left) who celebrated the Golden Jubilee 

of his Ordination on September 20, 1951. Seated at his right is Rev. 

Fr. Cyprian McGarvey, C.P., and standing between them Very Rev. Fr. 

Cornelius McArdle, C.P., Rector of Union City. 

300 



ulcers that have bothered him for 
years are very nearly healed. In the 
absence of the two Brothers, Brother 
Columhan, aided by several of the 
priests, carried on the extra work. 



LOUISVILLE 

On Thursday, September 20th, Sa- 
cred Heart Retreat was the scene of 
one of those rare events: the Golden 
Jubilee of Ordination. Rev. Fr. 
Charles Cassidy, C.P., completed fifty 
years in the priesthood with a joyous 
celebration with the Community and 
many visitors. Among the visitors 
were Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick, 
C.P., Provincial, Very Rev. Fr. Ca- 
millus, C.P., Rector of Immaculate 
Conception Retreat, Chicago, Very 
Rev. Fr. Gilbert, C.P., Rector of Holy 
Cross Monastery, Cincinnati, Very 
Rev. Fr. Bernard Mary, C.P., Rector 



of St. Gabriel's Monastery, Des 
Moines, and about 40 or 50 of the 
Diocesan Clergy, who came to con- 
gratulate Fr. Charles ori his glorious 
anniversary. 

Fr. Charles was celebrant of the 
Solemn High Mass which was held 
at 10:00 a.m. He was assisted by 
Rev. Fr. Linus, C.P., Sub-deacon, and 
Rev. Fr. Casey, Maysville, Deacon. 
Rev. Fr. Roger, C.P., was Master of 
Ceremonies. Rev. Fr. Ignatius Con- 
roy, C.P., delivered a beautiful ser- 
mon for the occasion. 

In his sermon, Fr. Ignatius re- 
marked that "in honoring him who 
has borne the yoke of the Master for 
half a century, we are honoring Jesus 
Christ, the great High Priest, from 
whom every duly ordained priest re- 
ceives his sacred character. 

It is a sacred character that makes 




View of the new Our Lady of Peace Hospital, formerly Mt. St. Agnes 
Sanitarium, next to Sacred Heart Retreat, Louisville, Kentucky. The right 
wing of the building is identical with that on the left. The location, at the 
top of a gentle sloping hill, is unquestionably one of the most beautiful 
in the state. 



301 



the Priest not only an Ambassador 
of Christ, but ANOTHER CHRIST. 
For that character makes the priest 
a sharer in the Power and Authority 
of Christ, so that the official acts of 
the Priest are the acts of Christ Him- 
self, because they are performed in 
his power and authority. 

For half a century our Jubilarian 
has exercised that awful authority, 
has wielded that awful power. 
Through all these years he has of- 
fered that Sacrifice that thrills the 
courts of Heaven, and by words of 
absolution has brought back many 
who had wandered from their Fa- 
ther's house. Through the Sacra- 
ments he has lavished Graces on the 
faithful, and has poured the healing 
balm into wounded hearts; the 
young he has trained in the ways of 
God, and the dying he has comforted 
and strengthened as only a Priest 
can do! . . . 

It is true that the work of a Priest 
in one day, in one year, in one ab- 
solution of sin, would be worthy of 
a celebration as elaborate as man 
could make it. At the end of one year 
of Priestly life a feast of thanksgiv- 
ing would be fitting. But God's good- 
ness is so abundant that in that very 
abundance we grow used to it, and 
take it for a matter of course. 

But fifty years form so large a part 
in a man's life, and fifty years of 
priestly life teem with so much bless- 
ing, that a Golden Jubilee rivets our 
attention and calls for special con- 
sideration. For a Golden Jubilee is a 
mile-stone, a shrine, along the path 
of life, near which we weary pilgrims 
are glad to rest a while in prayer. As 
we journey on towards Eternity, we 



are glad, after long periods, to look 
back and praise God for His good- 
ness in the hope that having gone 
thus far, His Graces will accompany 
us even to the end " 

The day was made notable further 
when the Students held a Communi- 
ty Program in honor of the Jubilari- 
an. The program was ingeniously 
worked out to portray Fr. Charles' 
many years of missionary work. The 
program was well arranged, and pre- 
sented in the form of a radio pro- 
gram. It was climaxed by the pre- 
sentation of a Spiritual Bouquet to 
Fr. Charles. 

A few days later the Community 
noted the Final Profession of Con- 
frater Kian, C.P. The inspiring cere- 
mony took place in St. Agnes Church 
in the presence of the whole Com- 
munity, on the Feast of St. Vincent 
Mary Strambi, September 25. Very 
Rev. Fr. Gordian, C.P. received the 
profession and oath of perseverance. 
Confrater Rian's parents, Mr. and 
Mrs. Vincent Clancy, of Windsor, 
Ontario, Canada, were present for 
the occasion. 

Sacred Heart Retreat, though un- 
affected by the personnel changes 
that took place in the Province dur- 
ing the past summer, learned in 
October that it was losing one of its 
missionaries and retreat masters. 
Rev. Fr. Finan, C.P. has been trans- 
ferred to Des Moines. Rev. Fr. Thad- 
deus, C.P., was welcomed to the Com- 
munity, on Oct. 30, to replace him. 



ST. LOUIS 

From Mother of Good Counsel Re- 
treat comes words that negotiations 
were recently completed for the ac- 



302 




View of the western end of the new Retreat House, 
brick construction painted white. 



The building is of 




View of the Chapel, fully furnished save for altar linens, as it was loft 
by the Alexian Brothers, for whom the building was used as a Novitiate. 



303 



quisition of the former Alexian 
Brothers Novitiate, located in Town 
and Country, near Clayton, Mo., for 
a new Laymen's Retreat House. The 
new Retreat House is located on a 
beautiful suburban estate. It con- 
tains about 120 acres of lawn, garden 
and woods. The setting is very near 
ideal. The mansion on the estate is 
a well-built building, about twenty 
years old. There are twin, four-car 
garages. It is beautifully planted, 
the approach being especially attrac- 
tive. 

At present the personnel of the 
small community stationed at the 
new Retreat House will consist of 
Rev. Fr. Quentin, C.P., Superior, Rev. 
Fr. Christopher, C.P., who is super- 
intending necessary changes and 
adaptations, Rev. Fr. Valentine, C.P., 
Retreat Director, Rev. Fr. Conell, 
C.P., Retreat Master, and Brother 



Anthony, C.P., who will help stock 
the new house with necessary fur- 
nishings and provisions. It is hoped 
that the retreats can begin as soon as 
possible. 



The Feast of the Most Holy Ros- 
ary, October 7th, saw the first ser- 
vices in the new modern St. Ann's 
Church, at Normandy. It will be re- 
membered that Rev. Fr. Bertrand, 
C.P., who was Pastor at the time the 
Parish was returned to the Arch- 
bishop of St. Louis, had much of the 
planning completed for the new 
Church of St. Ann's. With certain 
changes, notable among which was 
the decision not to rebuild part of the 
former tower as a special side-chapel, 
the present Pastor has carried 
through with Fr. Bertrand's original 
plans. In a recent publication by the 
F. W. Dodge Corporation, of New 




Rear view of the new Retreat House in St. Louis County, showing part of 
the spacious beautifully planted lawns. 



304 




Artist's drawing of the new St. Ann's Church, Normandy, Missouri. 



York, a book entitled "Planning and 
Building the Modern Church," by 

Prof. William Ward Watkin, Profes- 
sor Watkin features the new St. 
Ann's Church. 

"A unique plan," he writes, "has 
been developed in the new Church of 
St. Ann, now being built in St. Louis, 
Mo., Joseph Murphy, Architect. Here 
the nave is not of excessive length, 
but has unusual width. The seatings 
are shown to the right and to the left 
of the outer aisles. The Church is 
planned so that it widens out as we 
approach the sanctuary. Fine open- 
ness is gained by this wide approach. 
What we might normally expect from 
such a plan form — that is, a rather 
dull interior for the nave proper — 
is shown in the studies as essentially 



the traditional cross-section of the 
basilican church. By continuing the 
lofty nave as a rectangular form 
throughout the entire length of the 
church and giving even greater 
height to it as it reaches the sanctu- 
ary, a dominating reality like that 
of a basilican church is given to the 
central area. To the right and left of 
this central space the ceilings over 
the outer seatings are lower, rather 
in the manner of an aisle, but with- 
out supporting piers separating the 
nave from the aisle. By this means 
complete visibility is assured for all 
the Congregation. The widening of 
the Church as one approaches the 
sanctuary is to be commended. . . . 
In the plan which Prof. Murphy has 
suggested, a richness of the main 



305 



sanctuary and of the smaller sanc- 
tuaries of the chapels forms an in- 
spiring perspective as one enters the 
Church. Greater width has created 

greater interest " 

In years to come, St. Ann's Church 
will be known for the great stained 
glass window that forms the back 
wall of the entire sanctuary. On page 
116, Prof. Watkin writes, of "The 
use of large glass areas appearing in 
recent designs. . . . Sometimes this 
large area occupies the entire space 
of the sanctuary wall behind the high 
altar. . . . The field of glass has been 
thought of as a tapestry in glass, a 
rich colorful form with possible splen- 
did meaning. When the glass can be 
created with skill and artistry fully 
commensurate with the religious 
meaning sought, it is worth trying, as 
is being done in the window by Emil 



Frei, at St. Ann's Church in St. 
Louis." 

The new Church has not reached 
final completion. A number of lesser 
details remain unfinished, and will be 
provided in the immediate future. The 
pictures accompanying these pages 
are taken from the above-mentioned 
book, "Planning and Building the 
Modern Church," by Prof. Watkin, 
and are reprinted here with permis- 
sion of F. W. Dodge Corporation, the 
publisher, Mr. Joseph Murphy, the 
Architect, Mr. Emil Frei, designer 
of the stained glass window, and the 
Author. 



On September 20th, the Priests, 
Brothers and Seminarians gathered 
to congratulate and help Rev. Fr. 
Celestine, C.P., celebrate the Golden 
Jubilee of his Ordination to the 




Closer view of the immense stained glass window 
that covers the entire rear wall of the Sanctuary in 
the new St. Ann's Church, Normandy. 



306 




The Reverend Jubilarian, Fr. Celestine, C.P., surrounded by the Priests and 
Brothers of the Community on the occasion of the 50th Anniversary of his 
Ordination, Sept. 20, 1951. 



Priesthood. Fr. Celestine was or- 
dained September 21, 1901. However, 
since the day fell on Friday, it was 
anticipated one day, to the great 
satisfaction of all. It turned out to be 
a memorable day for all. 

Very Rev. Fr. Rector had appoint- 
ed Rev. Fr. Herbert as Master of 
Ceremonies for the occasion, and a 
masterful job was the result. The 
Seminarians, under the direction of 
Fr. Joel, rendered the Gregorian 
Chant for the Mass in outstanding 
fashion. At the Jubilarian's request, 
no sermon was preached; however, 
at the end of the Mass, Very Rev. Fr. 
Kyran, Rector, read a letter of the 
Most Rev. Archbishop Ritter, ex- 
tending felicitations and informing 



the Jubilarian that he had offered 
Mass for him that morning. Then a 
message from Very Rev. Fr. Provin- 
cial was read to the Jubilarian, ex- 
tending to him his own good wishes 
and those of the Province. Fr. Rec- 
tor then expressed his good wishes 
and those of the Community, and 
presented the Reverend Jubilarian 
with a document conveying the Holy 
Father's Blessing, obtained by Most 
Rev. Fr. Malcolm, C.P., First Gen- 
eral Consultor. 

After receiving the congratulations 
of the Community, the venerable ju- 
bilarian expressed his heartfelt 
thanks to all, for their kind remem- 
brance and prayers, and especially 
for the Masses he received from the 



307 



Priests. 

To add to the joy, Fr. Rector de- 
clared the day free. When noon ar- 
rived, the Community ate in the Stu- 
dents' Recreation, which the genius 
of the Master of Ceremonies had 
turned into a veritable fairy land. 
Golden flowers, sheaves of wheat and 
clusters of grapes tinted with gold 
were used to decorate the room. 
Brothers Bernard and David served 
a delicious jubilee dinner. Afterward, 
the Jubilarian arose to again express 
his thanks for so grand and joyful a 
celebration. 

It was a memorable day for Fr. 
Celestine and for all those who were 
privileged to be present for the cele- 
bration of his Golden Jubilee. May 



God grant the Reverend Jubilarian i 
the great happiness of seeing the 
gold turn to diamond! 




Golden Jubilarian, Rev. Fr. Celestine, 
C.P. after the Jubilee Mass. (Right) 
Fr. Walter, C.P., Vicar, Deacon, and 
(left) Rev. Fr. Cyprian, C.P., Sub- 
deacon. 



ST. PAUL, KANSAS 

Very Rev. Fr. Joseph Gartland, 
Very Rev. Fr. Elmer, and Fr. Bren- 
dan were present for the installation 
of Bishop Franz, the first Bishop of 
the new Diocese of Dodge City, Kan- 
sas. 

Sept. 25, the people of St. Paul 
were honored when Bishop Mark 
Carroll arrived to install Fr. Brendan 
their new Pastor. Msgr. Strecker, 
several Diocesan priests and the 
religious of the community were 
present in the sanctuary. Dinner, fol- 
lowed by the blessing of the new con- 
vent and the installation, was the 
order of the day. The Bishop took 
this occasion to pay tribute to St. 
Paul as the cradle of Catholicity in 
Kansas and to congratulate the par- 
ishioners on the fine spirit of cooper- 
ation they manifested in building the 
convent. He urged the same coopera- 
tion be given the new pastor, Fr. 
Brendan, as that given to Fr. Chris- 
topher. 

On October 7, St. Paul once again 
manifested its love for Our Blessed 
Mother as they turned out in crowds 
for the Rosary Procession. Thanks 
to the novices, the walks in the No- 
vices' Garden were outlined with can- 
dles and the Grotto stood out mag- 
nificently in the soft glow of candle 
light. 

Brother Matthew (Kenneth Capo- 
dice) of Chicago recently received 
the Holy Habit, following his pos- 
tulancy spent in Chicago and St. 
Paul. 



308 



On November 1, God blessed us 
with the arrival of another Brother 
Postulant. Wm. Thomas is from 
California and has spent the past sev- 
eral weeks helping out during the 
Diocesan Priests Retreats at Christ 
the King Retreat House in Citrus 

Heights. 

DES MOINES 

St. Gabriel Monastery joyfully wel- 
comed Very Rev. Father Malcolm, 
C.P., for a short visit, October 9th. 
Father's vivid narration of his var- 
ious experiences in Rome, and the 
canonizations of St. Maria Goretti 
and St. Vincent Mary Strambi high- 
lighted his visit. From Des Moines, 
Father Malcolm flew to California, 
where he will later meet Very Rev. 
Fr. James Patrick, Provincial and fly 
to Japan. 

It will be of interest to the Pro- 
vince to know that this year marks 
the 25th consecutive year that the 
Passionists have given the Novena 
to the Little Flower, at La Crosse, 
Wisconsin. The Pastor, for the oc- 
casion, published the list of all our 
Fathers who have given it, beginning 
with Fr. Silvan McGarry, in 1926, 
and ending with Rev. Fr. Clyde, in 
1951. . 

St. Gabriel's has noted several im- 
provements of late: four new ceilings 
have been built in the end rooms of 
the second floor. The porch roofs 
have been renewed. Recently, work 
began on a magazine room on the 
second floor. 



Louisville, to preach at the Golden 
Jubilee of Rev. Fr. Charles Cassidy's 
Ordination. 



CHRIST THE KING RETREAT 
HOUSE 

For five weeks, during September 
and October, retreats for the diocesan 
clergy were conducted at Christ the 
King Retreat House. Each week 20 
or 25 priests were here, from Mon- 
day evening to Friday morning. Fa- 
ther Jerome preached the retreats. 
The Bishop and priests all praised 
his conferences highly. For all the 
small community here it was a busy 
though interesting time. During 
these weeks, the laymen's retreats 
were conducted on the week ends 
as usual. 

During the month of September, 
the first issue of the "Retreatant" 
came off the press. It is a little Bul- 
letin to keep the retreatants inter- 
ested and in touch with affairs at 
Christ the King Retreat House. 

With the coming of cooler weather, 
work on the outdoor stations has 
been resumed. Volunteer workers, 
from among the retreatants, have 
been going (50 miles) up in the 
mountains to dig out quartz for 
building up the stations. 
HOUSTON 

Holy Name Retreat has spent a 
very busy Fall Mission Season. Prac- 
tically all the Missionaries are booked 
solid until the first of the year. 



Rev. Fr. Ignatius Conroy, C.P., 

spent some time in the hospital for 
a rest and check-up. In September, 
Father was able to make the trip to 



The development of the proposed 
Retreat House has been held up for 
lack of funds. As things stand at 
present, the date for the erection of 
the new Retreat House is indefinite. 



309 



However, there have been several 
minor improvements on the grounds. 
A new well, with a six inch casing 
going to 385 feet, has solved the 
water problem. 500 pyracantha bush- 
es have been planted, as a sort of 
protective screen, along the north and 
west property lines. Now in process 
of installation is a permanent set of 
Outdoor Stations of the Cross. 



OUR PARISHES 

During the past few months, the 
priests at Holy Cross Parish have 
been giving special emphasis to Fre- 
quent Communion in their sermons, 
as a means of securing world peace. 
The response of the laity has been 
very gratifying to the Pastor, Rev. 
Fr. Arthur, and his Assistant, Fr. 
James. 

Instead of the Block Rosary, Holy 
Cross Church has held the Rosary 
in Church each evening at 7:30. 
There has been very good attendance 
at this Evening Rosary. The Pastors 
kneel in the body of the Church with 
the people, and each evening a dif- 
ferent lay person leads the group in 
the Rosary. 

During October, Fr. Arthur an- 
nounced the opening of the Canteen 
for the Young People of the Parish. 
All the social activities and events 
will be under expert supervision. The 
Canteen will offer amusement and 
entertainment to the Catholic Youth 
of this whole territory. It is a much 
needed project, and deserves success. 

Holy Cross School recently drew 
a fire alarm. Fortunately, it was dur- 
ing the day that a blaze was discov- 
ered in the coal bin. It had not pro- 
gressed far, when discovered, and 



was extinguished before a great 
amount of damage was done. Never- 
theless, it necessitates the re-painting i 
of the school hall, and two class 
rooms. 

St. Gemma's Parish, in Detroit, re- 
ports an excellent Mission conducted) 
from October 14th to 18th by Rev. 
Fr. Kilian, C.P. 

The St. Gemma Parish Bulletin 
reports the new indult given to the 
Bishops of Michigan, whereby the 
clergy and the laity of the entire 
State of Michigan may follow Cen- 
tral Standard Time in regard to: 
a) the office; b) the celebration of 
Mass; c) the observance of the 
Eucharistic Fast; d) the observance 
of the Laws of Fast and Abstinence. 
(Cf. page 318, this issue.) 



PASSIONIST NUNS 

The Nuns at the Convent of the* 
Sacred Passion, Erlanger, Kentucky, 
held the ceremony of blessing and: 
consecrating their new tower bell. 
The Rt. Rev. Mgsr. H. Hillenmeyer, 
P.A., performed the ceremony on Oc- 
tober 9th. The bell was named in: 
honor of our Blessed Mother's As- 
sumption. Officers at the ceremony 
included Rev. Fr. H. Busemeyer, of I 
St. Patrick's Church, Verona, Ky., 
Deacon, and Rev. Fr. Howard, C.P.,, 
as Subdeacon. Rev. Fr. Reuben Mos- 
cowitz of Corpus Christi Church, 
Newport, Ky., was Master of Cere- 
monies. Others in attendance: Rev. 
Fr. Jasper, St. Henry's Church, Er- 
langer, and a fine representation ij 
from Holy Cross Retreat, in Cin- 
cinnati, Rev. Frs. Egbert, Bernard,! 
Angelo, Louis, Donald and Nicholas. 

It was a unique and interesting 



310 



ceremony, and a very impressive one 
for those who were witnessing the 
Blessing and Consecration of a Bell 
for the first time. 



Rev. Fr. Nicholas, C.P., Chaplain 
at the Convent of the Passion, has 
recently inaugurated a Monthly Day 
of Recollection for Ladies, on the 
First Friday of each month. The 
first of the series — held October 5th — 
was attended by about 50 ladies, a 
very auspicious start. 



Immaculate Conception Convent, 

Kirkwood, Missouri, informs us that 
they now have a novice. Consorella 
Mary Paul of the Immaculate Heart 
of Mary, formerly of St. Paul, Mis- 
souri, received the Holy Habit on 
September 14th. The Most Reverend 
Archbishop officiated with eight oth- 
er priests being present. Many rela- 
tives and friends of the novice also 
witnessed the ceremony. A most in- 
spiring sermon was delivered by Rev. 
Father Alphonse E. Westhoff of St. 
Peter's Church, Kirkwood. 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE CROSS 

OBITUARY OF BROTHER GABRIEL OF THE SORROWFUL VIRGINi 



Brother Gabriel often said that he 
wanted time to prepare for death. 
His wish was granted. He had almost 
two months to get ready. A few 
days before he went to the hospital he 
said to a priest of St. Paul's, "When 
I come to die, I want a little time to 
talk to Our Lord. I do not want to 
go out suddenly." "That would be 
all right if you did not have to suf- 
fer," replied the priest. "What is a 
little suffering compared to Our 
Lord's suffering and death on the 
Cross?" Brother Gabriel said. He 
was anointed by Fr. Rector before 
his operation, which took place short- 
ly after he entered St. Joseph's Hos- 
pital. He had long hours in which to 
commune with his Maker, to consider 
his last end, and to prepare for his 
departure. After long and useful 
years in the Congregation, his life 
came to a close on Sunday afternoon, 



August 5. He died peacefully, quietly, 
without struggle, in presence of Fa- 
ther Rector, Father Norman, Brother 
Edmund and relatives. 

Brother Gabriel, Joseph F. Kelly, 
the second child in a family of eight 
was born in Washington, D.C., July 
10, 1869. When he was twelve, the 
family moved to Pittsburgh. He soon 
got to know St. Paul's Monastery; he 
was employed there at cleaning 
bricks for church alterations when 
but thirteen years old. Brother Ga- 
briel attributed his Passionist voca- 
tion to his practice of never failing to 
lift his cap when passing the statue 
of St. Paul of the Cross. 

A glass worker in his youth, and a 
popular member of athletic clubs, in 
February, 1894, Joseph Kelly sur- 
prised his fellow workers and friends 
by entering our Novitiate. The ap- 
plicant was put off at the time of the 



i Joseph F. Kelly, of the Province of St. Paul of the Cross, died at Pitsburgh, Pa., on 
August 5th, 1951, in the 82nd year of his age, and the 56th year of his religious profes- 
sion. 



311 



first interview with the Master of 
Novices, Fr. George Basel. Father 
George told him to cut off his mus- 
tache and come back in a month. He 
returned, was accepted, and became 
a novice brother. Thirteen months 
later, March 22, 1895, he was pro- 
fessed. 

Brother Gabriel's first assignment 
was to St. Paul, Kansas, where he 
took care of the refectory and made 
sandals. Sandal making he had 
learned from Brother Sebastian Le- 
hane, an expert shoemaker in lay 
life, who had been sent to the Novi- 
tiate to teach his trade to the novice 
brothers. 

After a few years in Kansas, Broth- 
er Gabriel returned to Pittsburgh, 
where he was employed at the task 
he had worked at in the West. It 
was not long, however, before his 
genius came to light, and the Rector, 
Father Michael, employed the broth- 
er for various additional tasks. 

The next move in our brother's 
life was to St. Michael's Rectory, 
Pius Street, where he spent one year 
as cook. 

In 1902, the first band of Passion- 
ists took up residence in the Scran- 
ton Diocese. They went to live in a 
summer cottage at Harvey's Lake. 
This community consisted of Fathers 
Fidelis, Gregory, Eugene and Broth- 
er Gabriel. From May 1 to October 
22, 1902, when the community moved 
from the lake cottage to a home on 
Sloan Street, Scranton, not far from 
the Round Woods, where the Monas- 
tery was later built, the material 
needs of the community were supplied 
by Brother Gabriel. 

In the spring of 1902, he went to 



Chicago, where another foundation 
had been established. The Burham 
Estate at Norwood Park had been 
purchased. We read in The Passion- 
ists by Father Felix Ward, "A week 
before the Ascension Brother Gabriel 
came on from the East to arrange to 
set up the furniture and get the house 
ready for the opening." After helping 
in the work of establishing the Chi- 
cago foundation, Brother Gabriel re- 
turned to Pittsburgh,* where he 
cooked for a year. In 1908 he was 
sent to Brighton, where another new 
monastery was in the initial stage. 

When the Nevins Estate was pur- 
chased, there were three barns on the 
property. Two of them were removed 
and the largest transformed into a 
chapel. The monastery architect 
made some drawings for the 'barn 
chapel,' and Brother Gabriel, with 
the aid of a few men, did the work. 
"A stable turned into a chapel," ran 
a headline in the press, the morning 
following the chapel blessing. This 
newspaper account reads in part, 
"An ingenious brother of the order, 
a man with imagination, inventive 
skill, and power to plan and execute, 
has worked a transformation in this 
old stable. As pretty a church as 
may be seen has evolved out of sec- 
ond hand materials in the old barn." 
This "barn chapel" was used until 
the fall of 1927, when the basement 
of the present church was opened 
and blessed. 

At the time of the purchase of our 
summer home on Shelter Island, 
Father Stanislaus, the Provincial, 
wrote Brother Gabriel, stating that 
his services were needed there. He 
was requested to change a ram- 



312 



shackle farm-house into a place of 
homey warmth. While fulfilling this 
commission, Brother won the esteem 
of many islanders, both Catholic and 
non-Catholic. 

Later on he returned to Brighton to 
help with the heating system. After 
short periods in Union City and Bal- 
timore, he was assigned in January, 
1918, to Holy Cross, Dunkirk. The 
property there had been acquired by 
the Congregation in 1916, but the 
school did not open its doors to stu- 
dents until September 14, 1920. So, 
for more than two years and a half, 
Brother Gabriel once again lived in 
a residence and did the hard work 
that a new foundation necessarily 
entails. He remained in Dunkirk un- 
til 1924. 

His next assignment was Scranton, 
where, as at Dunkirk, he did a con- 
siderable amount of cement work. In 
1928 he was sent to Riverdale, then 
back to Baltimore a second time. 

On March 22, 1945, Brother Gabriel 
celebrated his golden jubilee of re- 
ligious profession at Holy Cross Pre- 
paratory Seminary, where he was 
then stationed. The celebrant of the 
Solemn High Mass of thanksgiving 
was Father Fabian Kelly of the 
Western Province, the jubilarian's 
brother, the preacher was Father 
Xavier, Rector of Holy Cross, and 
presiding was Father Carrol, the Pro- 
vincial. The brother jubilarian was 
honored by the Diocese of Buffalo on 
this occasion, when the Most Rev. 
Joseph A. Burke. D.D., Auxiliary 
Bishop of Buffalo, arrived at Holy 
Cross in the afternoon on March 21, 
to spend more than an hour with 
Brother Gabriel. The Bishop and 



his secretary had traveled to Dunkirk 
through a severe snow storm. 

Brother Gabriel returned to Pitts- 
burgh in 1948, and was there during 
the great extension and alteration 
which took place from 1948 to 1950. 
Active to the last, the man who en- 
tered St. Paul's Monastery in 1894, 
could be found scraping and varnish- 
ing desks in the attic of the same 
monastery in 1949. When the No- 
vices returned to St. Paul's in Janu- 
ary 1950, Brother Gabriel taught the 
young men sandal making in a shoe 
shop he set up in a new part of the 
building. 

This good brother made sandals 
and belts for the professed up to the 
time of his hospitalization. His last 
v/ork in concrete was the evening off 
of a wall outside the new choir; his 
final operation in tree surgery he per- 
formed on a rose of sharon tree which 
stands between the second and third 
stations in the monastery garden. 

How well and how long Brother 
Gabriel worked for the Congrega- 
tion! Past and present superiors at- 
test his willingness to work. Having 
made the offering of himself to God 
as a Passionist Brother, all that he 
had he gave to the Congregation. To 
work was part of him; the other part 
was to pray. 

Brother Gabriel prayed. During 
his last days in Pitsburgh, his morn- 
ing routine was to open the Church 
around five o'clock, then to say the 
Stations of the Cross in the Church, 
then to serve an early Mass. He could 
be seen making his way to the coffee 
room at seven. After making culpa, 
when asked the reason by someone 
who did not hear his low voice in the 



313 



refectory, he said it was because he 
overslept. "What time did you get 
up?" "Five fifteen," he replied. 

To see the brother at the exercises 
of the day observance was a familiar 
sight. One had but to look at him in 
the choir to perceive that he pos- 
sessed a deep realization of God's 
Holy Presence. He was one of those, 
who, after serving God through long 
years, radiate spirituality. There was 
a patient, quiet strength about him, 
and a pleasant, peaceful look. 

Even though his hearing failed 
somewhat in his declining years, he 
was always present at recreation. 
There as always, his great respect 
for priests was manifest. When dis- 
cussion of days long ago in the Con- 
gregation needed supplying of names 
and dates, it was to Brother Gabriel 
the brethren turned, and he unfail- 
ingly came forward with the infor- 
mation they asked. 

He was always interested in the 
work of the Congregation. His pleas- 
ant, offhand manner of greeting a 
priest returned from apostolic labors 
left the impression that here was a 
brother with a very lively interest in 
the work of saving and sanctifying 
souls, a brother who prayed much 
for the apostolic success of his broth- 
er Passionists. 

As his years became many and his 
body worn and thin, the cold caused 
him much suffering. He did not com- 
plain. He did not give up. This suf- 
fering of old age did not put out the 
fire of his spirit, or slow the rate of 
his step, or dull his sense of humor. 

A surprising number of people at- 
tended his funeral mass, which was 
sung by Father Provincial. His body 



rests in the shadow of the same 
Church for which he cleaned bricks 
as a boy. He is gone from the scene, 
but not from the memories of his 
brethren. May his soul rest in peace! 



PASSIONIST SISTERS 

November marks the end of an 
eventful year for the Passionist Sis- 
ters of Our Lady of Dolors Province 
in New England. The newly consti- 
tuted Province has indeed felt the 
consoling and strengthening care of 
the Mother of Sorrows. 

Several aspirants to the Order 
were received at the Novitiate in 
Bristol, and, at ceremonies presided 
over by the Reverend Russell J. 
McVinney, Bishop of Providence, five 
Sisters pronounced their first vows. 
Within the next week two natives of 
Argentina will complete their novice- 
ship before returning to South Ameri- 
ca. 

Tokens of God's blessing and pro- 
tection were evident throughout the 
year in our being able to add new 
grades in the more recently opened 
schools, and in the success attending 
the Sister's efforts in Vacation 
Schools and studies during the sum- 
mer. Better than all previous records 
was the attendance of retreatants at 
the Immaculate Heart of Mary Re- 
treat House in Peace Dale, where 
Passionist Fathers frequently con- 
ducted the Exercises. Climaxing all 
community activities, the annual re- 
treat was given by Reverend Jerome 
O'Grady, C.P. There is every reason 
to hope that his words of inspiration 
and encouragement will be our strong 
support in the work and through the 
days that lie ahead. 



314 



ITALY 

The Province of the Pieta saw two 

of its young men ordained to the 
Priesthood on September 14, the feast 
of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross. 
Rev. Frs. Linus and Cherubim, C.P. 
enjoyed the privilege of being or- 
dained during the centenary year of 
the Province. Their ordination took 
place at Isola del Gran Sasso, at the 
Shrine of St. Gabriel. 

A short three weeks previously, on 
August 26th, the external feast of 
St. Gabriel was held at Gran Sasso 
for the people. The feast was preced- 
ed by a Triduum, and accompanied 
by the finest weather. In the crowd- 



PROVINCES ABROAD 

ed basilica, His Excellency, Msgr. 
Gremigni, Bishop of Teramo, on the 
morning of the feast, conferred the 
Subdiaconate upon four young Pas- 
sionists. In the afternoon, the body 
of St. Gabriel was carried on the 
shoulders of the four new Subdea- 
cons to the square in front of the 
basilica, and there Rev. Fr. Marcel, 
C.P., delivered the sermon to the 
great numbers of faithful who had 
come for the occasion. 

The evening was enlivened with 
stirring music by a good Band. Fire- 
works, sky-rockets and huge balloons 
provided amusement for the many 
visitors to the Shrine. 




The Basilica at Isola del Grail Sasso, showing the huge crowds present for the 
feast of St. Gabriel, August 26, 1951. 

315 




The Retreat and Shrine of St. Gabriel, at Isola del Gran Sasso. The building 
at the left of the picture is the new wing which houses retreatants, and the 
Shrine magazine L'Eco di S. Gabriele. 



The external feast of St. Gabriel 
does not mark the end of the pil- 




Picture of the 1951 Ordinands in the 
Province of St. Gabriel, Belgium. Left 
to right: Fr. Isidore, Liebrecht, Paul- 
inus, Bertrand (Director), Leopold and 
Galileus. 



grimage season to St. Gabriel's 
Shrine. They will continue until 
November clothes the whole region 
in a mantle of snow, and the Retreat 
relapses into its wintry solitude. 



BELGIUM 

The Province of St. Gabriel held its 
first Missionary Congress, beginning 
July 18th, under the presidency of 
Most Rev. Fr. Albert, C.P., General, 
and Very Rev. Fr. Bernardine, C.P., 
Provincial. The Congress was held at 
Kruishoutem, at the Retreat of St. 
Gabriel. Thirty-four missionaries and 
retreat masters, including Fr. Gen- 
eral and Fr. Provincial, gathered to 
consider important questions in re- 
gard to a modern technique in parish 
missions. 



316 



IRELAND 

The Province of St. Patrick marked 
the Holy Year by the foundation of 
a new Preparatory Seminary at To- 
bar Mhuire, Crossgar, Co. Down. 
Tobar Mhuire — Mary's Well — is with- 
in an afternoon's walk of both Saul, 
where St. Patrick made his contem- 
plative retreat during his declining 
years, and Downpatrick, where with 
St. Brigid and St. Columkille he 
awaits the resurrection. 




August 25th saw the Ordination of 
Fr. Medard, C.P., (second from left) 
of the Province of St. Gabriel, in Bel- 
gium. As a former head of a Jocist 
(Young Workers Group), Msgr. Car- 
dijn, the founder, sent a special repre- 
sentative, Fr. E. H. Housen (left). 
The Young Worker at the right is 
a representative of the local group. 



Tobar Mhuire is an estate com- 
prising sixty-six statute acres in the 
town of Crossgar, and in the parish 
of Kilmore, Down and Conor. It is 
situated on the main Belfast-Down- 
patrick road, about seventeen miles 
from Belfast and five from Down- 
patrick. The main house, large and 
spacious, faces the south. To the rear 
a block of double storey buildings in 
cut stone forms an enclosed quad- 
rangle with the house, which is dom- 
inated on its southeastern side by a 
large Norman tower. The living 
quarters are compact and easily ac- 
cessible from all sides. 

A thousand years ago, Mary's Well 
bubbled as it still does today, placid, 
limpid and cool, to provide the monks 
of a nearby Abbey with their daily 
water supply. More recently, during 
World War II, the gravelled avenue 
that runs before the house was rutted 
by the jeeps of American officers who 
were billetted on the estate. 



On Saturday, September 8, the 
Feast of Our Lady's Nativity, Rev. 
Fr. Boniface (Connolly), C.P., cele- 
brated the Golden Jubilee of his Or- 
dination to the Priesthood, at St. 
Paul's Retreat, Mount Argus, Dublin. 
Fr. Boniface was ordained by Most 
Rev. Dr. Whiteside, Bishop of Liver- 
pool, on September 8, 1901. Two of 
Father's Classmates, Rev. Frs. Ga- 
briel and George, C.P., were celebrat- 
ing their Jubilee in St. Joseph's Pro- 
vince. 



317 






ITEMS OF 



Th 



e 



/A % 



sr 



Bulletin 
Board 



% 



,Mp nim 



CE 



The American Edition of the Ordo 
Congregationis, for 1952, appeared 
during the month of October. In gen- 
eral, the compiler has followed the 
lines of the excellent Ordos formerly 
edited by Rev. Fr. Vincent Mary, C.P., 
with a very few minor changes. One, 
for example is the inclusion, in the 
Supplementum — pro aliquibus locis — 
of the month and day. This should 
also help in another way. Upon re- 
ceiving the Ordo, an individual may 
consult the Supplementum for those 
feasts and days which require special 
rubrics and mark them immediately, 
so that they will not be overlooked 
in the course of the year. Another 
minor change — or correction, rather 
— came in the listing of the variations 
in time. An error that persisted in- 
explicably for several editions of the 
Ordo was detected and corrected. The 
Compiler of the Ordo trusts that 
there are no further errors. He wel- 
comes suggestions for improving the 
Ordo, and asks that any mistakes, 
or doubts, be reported to: The Pas- 
sionist Ordo, 1924 Newburg Road, 
Louisville 5, Kentucky. 

318 



From Michigan comes an import- 
ant announcement with regard to the 
variation in time. By virtue of a spe- 
cial indult which the Bishops of 
Michigan recently received from the 
Holy See, the clergy and the laity 
of the entire state of Michigan may 
follow Central Standard Time in the 
following instances: a) the public 
and private recitation of the Divine 
Office; b) in the public and private 
celebration of Mass( however, in 
virtue of special diocesan legislation, 
no Mass to be attended by any of the 
faithful may begin after 12:00 noon, 
Central Standard Time); c) in the 
observance of the Eucharistic fast be- 
fore celebrating Mass or receiving 
Holy Communion; d) in the observ- 
ance of the laws of Fast and Ab- 
stinence. 



In its September issue, Catholic 
Building and Maintenance, published 
by Joseph F. Wagner, Inc., New York, 
carried a very complete illustrated 
article about St. Paul's Monastery, 
Pittsburgh, Pa. This is the second 
time during the past year that Cath- 



olic Building- and Maintenance has 

featured one of our new construc- 
tions. The March issue carried an 
article about the new Mater Dolorosa 
Laymen's Retreat House, at Sierra 
Madre, California. Fortunately, we 
were able to secure a number of 
reprints of that article and mailed 
them out, as far as they went, 
with the last issue of The Passionist. 



names, we are informed, are Rev. 
Fathers Hilary, Philip, Ferdinand, 
Paul M., and Richard. 



As noted in an earlier issue of The 
Passionist, 1951 marked the Centen- 
ary of the foundation of the Province 
of the Pieta. For the occasion, the 
Province published an excellent Bro- 
chure of 150 pages, profusely illus- 
trated. It features a section on the 
Retreats of the Province, with pic- 
tures of the houses and the Communi- 
ties and a short history of each. 
Next, there follows a Section de- 
voted to the men of the Province 
who have been outstanding for their 
holiness entitled: Province of the 
Saints. It lists seventy-one religious 
in this section and gives a brief bio- 
graphy of each. Among the number 
are such outstanding names as: St. 
Gabriel, Confrater Pius of St. Aloy- 
sius, Fr. John of the Holy Spirit, Fr. 
Bernard Mary of Jesus and Fr. Nor- 
bert of Holy Mary, C.P. There is a 
section on the Prep School, another 
on the Apostloate (which features 
the Bulgarian Mission), one on the 
Lay Brothers, Army Chaplains, Writ- 
ings and Writers, the Passionist Nuns 
and lists of living and Dead Members 
of the Province. All in all, the Bro- 
chure is a very complete index of the 
Pieta Province during the past 100 
years. Its compilers deserve credit 
for a job very well done. Their 



Cincinnati reports that the new 
Maria Goretti Badges, similar to 
Sacred Heart Badges, are available 
and are being circulated very widely. 
Greater impetus and distribution is 
expected in the near future when Fr. 
Conroy will publicize them in his col- 
umn in Our Sunday Visitor devoted 
to Young People. It is hoped that 
this badge will be recognized as the 
official bade of the Fighting 69ers, the 
legion for purity. 

On sale in Cincinnati is the "St. 
Maria Goretti work kit." It includes 
material for making 100 badges — 
1000 pictures and 200 celophane cov- 
ers. With the purchase of the kit 
($2.00), there is donated a length 
of ribbon that has been touched to a 
first class relic of St. Mary Goretti. 
Covers and pictures are punched with 
24 holes suitable for crocheting and 
especially for use of plastic lacing. 
The printing on the reverse side of 
the picture reads: "Cloth touched to 
relic of St. Maria Goretti. Lily of 
Purity, Patroness of Youth, Pray for 
me." 



We were pleased to find, in the 
September issue of The Review for 
Religious, Rev. Fr. Fidelis Rice's 
article on Passionist Spirituality. We 
feel certain that all will want to read 
this excellent article from the cap- 
able pen of Fr. Fidelis, C.P. 



Rev. Fr. Nicholas Schneiders, C.P., 
Chaplain at the Passionist Nun's 
Convent of the Sacred Passion, Er- 



319 



langer, Kentucky, has recently put 
out a pamphlet entitled "The Work 
and Vocation of the Passionist 
Nuns." Besides a description of the 
vocation of a Passionist Nun, reprint- 
ed from "Beneath the Cross," it also 
contains pictures of our Passionist 



Saints with short sketches of their 
lives and appropriate prayers in their 
honor. Copies of the pamphlet may 
be obtained from Fr. Nicholas, C.P., 
Convent of the Sacred Passion, Don- 
aldson Highway, Rt. 4, Erlanger, 
Kentucky. 




"SELECTED LETTERS OF 
RECENT PASSIONIST GENERALS" 

Edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew (Vetter) of the Holy 

Family, C.P. 



Containing 14 Letters of past and present 

Generals, 1925-1950, 315 pages with Index. 

$2.00 



Order from "The Passionist." 



320 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, DECEMBER 1951 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 

Neil 3 

Joseph 4 

Camillus 5 

Kilian 7 

Benedict 

Cyril 

David 

Augustine 

Vincent 

Norbert 

Alban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

Gregory Mc 

Joseph M. 13 

Pius 

Alan 26 

Kenneth 

Benet 10 

Barnabas M. 27 

Wm Gail 14 

Gregory Jos 

Leo Patrick 

Paul 

Godfrey 

John Baptist 12 

Noel 10 

Rene 16 

Carroll 23 

Simon 33 

Students 

Barry 

John Francis 

Victor 

Gail 

J. Gabriel 

Myron 

Denis 

Albert 

Eugene 

Mcinrad 

Bruce 

Berchmans 



13 



17 



Francis Martin 
Carl Anthony 

Brothers 

Felix 
Gilbert 
Leo 
John 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert 5 

Egbert 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Angelo 20 

Louis 

Nicholas 15 

Cyprian F. 9 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Donald 

Howard 

Wilfrid 18 

James 10 

Brothers 

Columban 

William 

James 

LOUISVILLE 

Gordian 5 

Bartholomew 7 

Adalbert 

Charles C. 

Lawrence 

Anselm 9 

Andrew 

Thomas 

Hubert 

Marion 

Arnold 

Robert B. 

Alfred 

Flannon 



Thaddeus 
Roger 17, 21 
John 29 
Forrest 28 
Fergus 10 
Warren 

Students 

Venard 

Caspar 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bede 

Rian 

Jude 

Brothers 

Luke 
Gabriel 
Casimir 
Denis 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 9 
Celestine 31 
John Philip 
Aloysius 
Herbert 
Kevin 
Claude 
Edgar 32 
Ervan 32 
Anthony 
Germain 32 
Cyprian 32 
William Jos. 32 
Emil 32 
Roch 17, 32 
Joel 32 
Loon 32 
Campion 32 
Raymund 32 
Alvin 30 



Brothers 

Bernard 
Conrad 
Regis 
David 



ST. PAUL 

Elmer 5 
Faustinus 6 
Cormac 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 
Edward 
George 
Urban 
Brendan 9 
Leopold 
Jeremias 
Paschal 
Charles G. 
Ronan 
Jordan 10 
Firmian 11 

Brothers 

Louis 
Philip 
Robert 

Novices 

Edwin 

Cletus 

Kevin 

Ambrose 

Andrew Mary 

Stephen 

Vincent 

Bernard 

Leonard 

Gerald 

Louis 

Joseph M 

Philip 

Bro. Joachim 

Bro. Francis 

Bro. Leonard 

Bro. Paul 



Postulant 

Kenneth 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 

Miles 7 

Ignatius C. 

Justin 

Cornelius 

Sylvester 

Malachy 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Matthew V. 17 

Regis 

Finan 

Ignatius B. 24 

Thomas More 25 

Frederick 25 

Keith 

Columban 22 

Randal 

Clyde 

Loran 

Students 

Gerard 

Peter 

Michael Jos. 

Raphael 

Benedict 

Theodore 

Owen 

Francis 

Casimir 

Sebastian 

Brothers 

Romuald 
Thomas 
George 
Charles 

DETROIT 

Julius 5 
Ralph 7 
David F. 
Alexis 



321 



Boniface 

Gerard 

Mark 

Conrad 

Timothy 

Roland 

Fidelis 

Patrick 9 

Colum 

Robert C. 

Mel 

Nilus 

Roderick 

Harold 

Declan 18 

Brothers 

Aloysius 

Theodore 

Justin 

Gerald 

Linus 



20 



SIERRA 
MADRE 

Herman 5 
Paul Francis 7 
Reginald 
Gabriel 19 
Maurice 21 
Ferdinand 
Martin 
Philip 
Austin 
Eustace 20 
Theophane 
Aidan 
Joyce 17. 
Edw. Guido 
Ernest 
I'sadore 18 



Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Michael 

Ward 

Dominic 

Bernardine 

Brothers 

Richard 

Gerald 

Joseph 

BIRMINGHAM 

Canute 8 

Hilary 

Lambert 

Terence 

Brice 

Bro. Henry 



SACRAMENTO 

Basil 5 
Leo 

Damian 18 
Dunstan 
Henry 
Jerome 20 
Bro. Patrick 
HOUSTON 
Conleth 8 
Stanislaus 
Bertrand 
Clarence 
John Aelred 
Bro. Daniel 

ENSLEY 
Nathanael 9 
Ludger 
Canisius 
Carl 10 

FAIRFIELD 

Edmund 



ST. LOUIS 

Quentin 8 
Christopher 
Valentine 18 
Conell 20 
Bro. Anthony 

CHINA 

Anthony M. 41 
William W. 41 
Cyprian L. 41 
James L. 41 
James L. 42 
Francis Fl. 42 
Harold Trav. 41 

CHAPLAINS 

Fabian 34 
Leonard 35 
Xavier 36 
Brian 37 
Cyril M. 38 
Kenny 39 
Lucian 40 



REFERENCES 



1. SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Rome (147), Italy 


25 


2. Provincial 


26 


3. First Consultor 


27 


4. Second Consultor 


28 


5. Rector 


29. 


6. Master of Novices 


30 


7. Vicar 


31 


8. Superior 


32 


9. Pastor 


33 


10. Assistant Pastor 


34. 


11. Vice Master 


35. 


12. Lector of Church History 




13. Lector of Dogma 


36. 


14. Chaplain at Dunning 




15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 


37. 


16. Provincial Secretary 




17. Director of Students 


38. 


18. Retreat Director 




19. Assistant Retreat Director 


39. 


20. Retreat Master 




21. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 


40. 


22. Lector of History 




23. Box 1246, Catholic University, Wash- 


41. 


ington 17, D.C. 




24. Lector of English 


42. 



Lector of Philosophy 

Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture 

Lector of Canon Law 

Lector of Moral Theology 

Vice Director 

Chaplain, St. Vincent's 

Lector 

Vocational Director 

723 5th Avenue, Kalispell, Mont. 

Veterans Administration, P.O. Box 9821, 

Aspinwall, Pa. 

LCDR CHC USNR, U.S. Naval Sta., 

Navy No. 720, FPO— New York 

Box 21, Navy No. 127, c/o P.M., Seattle, 

Washington 

HQ CCB 2 AD, APO 42, c/o P.M., New 

York 

HQ 31st Inf Regt., APO 7, c/o P.M., 

San Francisco 

USS McCaffrey D.D.E. 860, Fleet P.O., 

New York 

c/o Fr. Anthony Maloney, C.P., Kow- 

loon Box 3323, Hongkong 

The Sign, Union City, N.J. 



322 



OLD KENTUCKY HOME 

(Continued from page 260) 
Back to Sacred Heart Retreat 
and the quiet of the cloister, the 
missionaries, so the chronicler in- 
forms us, had a season, free from 
calls, and gave themselves up un- 
disturbedly to the enjoyment of 
that religious peace and happiness 
which their retirement conferred. 
Strict attendance on the summons 
of the regular observance, and the 
full choir at midnight chant and 
morning and evening prayer, 
seemed to unite more intimately 
the minds and hearts of the com- 
munity and show forth more plain- 
ly "how good and pleasant it is for 
brethren to dwell in harmony to- 
gether." 

This brief period of calm on the 
Mission front continued practically 
until the Spring of 1885, when 
Frs. James and Xavier received an 
appointment to give a Mission at 
St. Rose of Lima Church, Chicago, 
Illinois. Many years before, some 
Df our Fathers had given the Spir- 
itual Exercises in that teeming 
western outpost, and their zeal was 
richly crowned. However, some of 
the pastors could not forget their 
strong accent and foreign ways, 
and they had not been invited back. 
That was many years before. Now, 
3ur Fathers came again into the 
sity and their work flung open the 
Btes that had been closed to us 
and introduced the Order anew to 
the clergy and laity. Requests for 



more missions poured in. Frs. 
Robert and Cuthbert went on to 
help. 

Meanwhile, a few more improve- 
ments were made at home, includ- 
ing a new fence around the proper- 
ty, a new barn and other like con- 
structions. Notable among the local 
Chapter records is the unanimous 
approval of the installation of the 
new invention, the telephone. Sever- 
al of the Fathers argued very 
strongly that while solitude is good 
for the soul, it was harming our 
work to be cut off too completely 
from the city and the country at 
large. Many a time telegraphic 
dispatches had to be delayed over- 
night or arrived too late to be at- 
tended to because of the distance 
from the city. This new invention, 
the telephone, would put the Mon- 
astery in immediate contact with 
the telegraphic office. The vote was 
unanimous. 

ST. AGNES PARISH 

Late in the year 1890, Bishop 
McCloskey called upon our Fathers 
to preach a Novena at the Cathe- 
dral in preparation for the Feast 
of the Immacualte Conception. Frs. 
Felix and Leo were assigned to the 
work, and the results were very 
pleasing to the Bishop. As a mark 
of his appreciation, he requested 
the Passionists to act as Chaplains 
to the Sisters and pupils at St. 
Agnes Academy — a stone's throw 
down the road from the Retreat. 



323 



At the same time he requested 
(through Fr. Bouchet, the Vicar- 
General) that we take over the 
charge of St. Agnes Parish, which 
comprised the district in the im- 
mediate neighbourhood of the Re- 
treat. Originally founded by Fr. 
George McCloskey, the Bishop's 
brother who was also president of 
Preston Park Seminary across the 
road from St. Agnes Academy, it 
was at the present time under the 
zealous care of good Fr. Louis 
Deppen, who had built another 
church farther East, on Bardstown 
Road, for the German-speaking por- 
tion of the parish. These requests 
received the approval of the Very 
Rev. Fr. Provincial. 

On May 15, 1892, Bishop Mc 
Closkey visited St. Agnes Church 
to confer the sacrament of Con- 
firmation, and took advantage of 
the occasion to express his deep 
appreciation for the progress made. 
As a further mark of his friend- 
ship, he requested Fr. Felix to hold 
the parish of St. Agnes in per- 
petuum. 

Two years previously, when the 
Passionists had taken over St. Ag- 
nes Parish, and Fr. Deppen had 
moved over to his new St. Francis 
Church, it was thought best to 
abandon the little frame church 
of St. Agnes and make the Retreat 
Chapel the parish church, for the 
people loved to come to the Mon- 
astery. Soon the Chapel was over- 
crowded, and when Fr. Denis Cal- 



lagee succeeded Fr. Felix as Rector, 
in September of 1893, it could i 
scarcely accommodate the congrega- 
tion. He immediately set about toi 
acquire the little frame church that 
was standing abandoned on a strip 
of land southeast of the retreat. 
His first move was to commend 
the project to our Blessed Lady 
and St. Joseph. Then he placed 
the statues of these two patrons 
under the building, and awaited 
results. It was October 19, 1893. 

Sometime later, when he went 
in company with the Provincial and 
Fr. Felix to see the Bishop, he 
found His Excellency not only will- 
ing to let them buy the building, 
but even eager to donate it with 
all its furnishings. However, sell- 
ing the strip of land on which it 
was situated was something else . . . 
and the bishop wanted to think 
it over. 

Consequently, January of 1894 
saw the little frame church moved 
over to our property. Plans were 
to make it the parish church once 
again, but it was soon apparent 
that it would be far better to raze 
it and use the material to enlarge 
the Monastery Chapel. This was 
eventually the outcome. 

THE DECLINE 

Not until the Chapter of 1902 
was Sacred Heart Retreat reduced 
to the status of a mission house. 
Nevertheless, as early as 1894, it 
was evident that our "southern 



324 



star" was beginning to decline. Au- 
gust 28th, the class of students, 
under the direction of Rev. Fr. 
Matthew, had been sent on to the 
new foundation in the distant West, 
Osage Mission, in southeastern 
Kansas, a territory only recently 
vacated by wild savages. Upon their 
departure, the regular observance 
came to a halt. When four newly- 
professed students arrived in mid- 
September to take their place, the 
office was resumed, but it was never 
quite complete again. 

The following February our man- 
power was further taxed when we 
took over the parish of St. Edward's 
at Jeffersontown. For over a year 
the Bishop had not been able to 
find a pastor for the parish, and 
as a consequence, the scattered 
Catholic families had become care- 
less in the performance of their 
religious duties. Many openly apos- 
tatized. Fr. Valentine gave a Mis- 
sion there and succeeded in re- 
claiming some thirty families, 
which then made up the nucleus 
of the parish. The old and di- 
lapidated St. Edward's Church was 
repaired and redecorated. Fr. 
Denis promised to send a priest 
there every Sunday for Mass. The 
Parish resumed a full life again. 
When, the following June, Bishop 
McCloskey made his first visit to 
the place, his coming was treated 
like a civil celebration. Everyone 
was greatly pleased, but none quite 
so much as the Bishop. "This visi- 



tation," he exclaimed, "is the most 
pleasant and agreeable one I have 
made in years, and as a material 
proof of my genuine delight I am 
offering $200 to the Passionist Fa- 
thers for coming here to say Mass." 

INFRINGEMENT 

For over twenty years the Pas- 
sionists had been taking an ever- 
increasing part in the active work 
of the diocese. Not only had they 
given Missions and Retreats and 
Forty Hours by the score, they had 
also taken the places of vacationing 
pastors, helped sick and convales- 
cing priests and shouldered a great 
deal of the Sunday work. As the 
Platea remarks, "nothing was left 
undone to gain the good-will of the 
Bishop." 

It came as an alarming surprise, 
therefore, when we learned from 
one of the Diocesan Consultors in 
the Summer of 1901 that His Ex- 
cellency had outlined a new parish 
within our own boundaries, and 
had already appointed the pastor. 
Fr. Felix, the Rector, wrote the 
Bishop a respectful letter of pro- 
test. 

"I learn on good authority," he 
said, "that a new parish has been 
outlined between St. Bridget's and 
St. Agnes', and that the boundary 
of this new parish in our direction 
will be the city limits. This brings 
it almost to our grounds. Looking 
to future complications and the 
interests of religion I feel con- 



325 



strained to call Your Lordship's 
attention to the point and respect- 
fully ask that you reconsider the 
need of a new parish out here 
and the hardship it will entail on 
the Passionist Fathers. We have 
at present only fifteen families in 
St. Agnes Parish. But with the 
little support it would give us by 
and by we could continue to work 
in other parts of the Diocese that 
are too poor to give us any com- 
pensation." 

Fr. Felix's letter was forwarded 
to Duluth, where (the chronicler 
says) "the Bishop had gone to 
escape the oppressive heat." By 
coincidence, it crossed the Bishop's 
own letter announcing the division : 

"With the advice of the Con- 
suitors of the Doicese," His Ex- 
cellency's letter read, "we have de- 
termined to establish another par- 
ish embracing the Eastern part 
of the city lying between Edenside 
Avenue (about two squares West 
of the old toll-gate on the Bards- 
town Road) and the city limits 
on the East; and on the West to 
a line halfway between Edenside 
Avenue and St. Bridget's Church, 
which line runs North and South 
from the Newburg Road to the 
Cherokee Park. As you are still 
resident outside the city, I trust 
that the arrangements will prove 
satisfactory." 

For several reasons, however, the 
arrangement did not seem satis- 
factory, either to the Provincial or 



to the Fathers of the Community. 
Acting upon their advice, the Rec- 
tor, Fr. Felix, wrote once again 
to the Bishop listing in detail the 
reasons that militated against the 
dismemberment of St. Agnes Par- 
ish. First of all, the new parish 
was to be formed from three little 
parishes, none of which were ablei 
to support themselves at the pres- 
ent time. Secondly, the people ini 
the territory allotted to the new 
parish were decidedly opposed toi 
the burden it would place on themj 
Thirdly, the three churches already; 
in existence were but short disn 
tances from one another, and easi- 
ly accessible to all. Fourthly, it 
would take from St. Agnes Parish,; 
the smallest of the three, even the 
means necessary for conducting the 
Divine Services with becoming pro- 
priety. The congregation numbered 
only one hundred twenty-five souls,! 
and its revenue for the year 1901 
amounted to only $262.97. 

Nevertheless, the new parish! 
lines had already been set, and the 
new pastor appointed. When, as: 
was to be expected, His Excellency 
stood by his decision, Very Rev., 
Fr. Provincial thought it well toi 
represent our case to the Apostolic! 
Delegate at Washington, D.C., and 
instructed Fr. Felix accordingly., 
Cardinal Martinelli, in turn, ad-' 
vised the Passionists to refer thd 
question to Rome. A short timd 
later, however, His Eminence was] 
pleased to report to Fr. Felix thafa 



326 



it would not be necessary, that 
Bishop McCloskey had decided a- 
gainst changing the St. Agnes Par- 
ish lines, and that the matter was 
consequently concluded. 

An unfortunate incident occurred 
during the time Fr. Felix was con- 
ferring with the Apostolic Delegate. 
It was one of those tricks of the 
devil that try men's souls at the 
time, which they can smile at after- 
ward. The Louisville Courier Journ- 
al came out with an article on 
Sacred Heart Community, in which 
it stated : "The priests of the Pas- 
sionist Order are independent of 
the Bishop of the Diocese and are 
under the control of their Super- 
ior." True, as far as it went, but 
exceedingly untimely! 

When Fr. Felix recovered from 
the shock of reading the morning 
paper, he immediately contacted the 
Assistant City Editor and asked: 
"Where did the reporter get that 
idea?" "Just deduction," came the 
reply. "The reporter didn't get it 
from any of your priests; he just 
drew the conclusion himself. Not 
being a Catholic, he wasn't con- 
versant with the subject like I am. 
I saw the error . . . and was going 
to correct it, but I was afraid it 
would make matters worse. I hope 
nothing of this kind will occur a- 
gain in the future." 

Fr. Felix forwarded this letter 
together with one of his own to 
the Bishop, in explanation. He con- 
cluded: "I am confident that you 



will be pleased to see that it ex- 
onerates me and my associates from 
responsibility for the said plblica- 
tion. Again I beg to assure Your 
Lordship that the Passionist Fa- 
thers yield to none in respeect for 
Episcopal rank and authority . . ." 

Nevertheless, the very untime- 
liness of the incident was well cal- 
culated to keep everybody in sus- 
pense. Indeed, for a time, it seemed 
that the Passionists were under a 
cloud in the Diocese of Louisville. 
For a limited period the Fathers 
found very little work in the Dio- 
cese. Eventually, every difference 
was smoothed over, and the sun 
was once more shining brightly 
on our old Kentucky home. 

REDUCED TO MISSION HOUSE 

For some time there had been 
talk of a new Monastery in Louis- 
ville. Something had to be done. 
The architect who examined the 
old structure exclaimed : "Get out 
of the place! The building is liable 
to collapse at any moment. You are 
endangering your lives by living in 
it!" During his previous visita- 
tion, Very Rev. Fr. General had 
approved the idea of building "on 
condition that the new Retreat be 
built for a Novitiate." He now 
renewed his permission, provided 
the means permitted it. 

Before proceeding, however, the 
Fr. Provincial decided to clear up 
two conditions. Firstly, the city 
must put through a road from Bax- 



327 



ter Avenue to Newburg; and sec- 
ondly, the strip of land southeast 
of the Retreat had to be secured. 
The opening of the new road would 
give us water, electric lights and 
drainage, while the parcel of land 
would place the new building in 
the center of a plateau that would 
give us privacy and solitude on 
all sides. 

While these things were pending 
indefinitely, the Chapter of 1902 
reduced Sacred Heart Retreat to 
the status of a Mission House. Fr. 
Albert Phelan was appointed its 
superior. The Community was dis- 
banded to other houses, with the 
exception of Frs. Richard, Edmund 
and Erasmus. Three of the Broth- 
ers, Richard, Conrad and Frederick, 
also stayed on. A month later young 
Brother Luke replaced Brother 
Frederick, who was transferred to 
St. Louis. 

In due time our fortunes began 
to improve. Mayor Weaver of Louis- 
ville, through the appeal of Fr. 
Richard (who had replaced Fr. Al- 
bert as Superior), interested him- 
self in our cause and took up the 
improvement of Baxter Avenue 
through to Newburg Road. Aided 
by several friends of the Monas- 
tery, property lines and litigation 
were adjusted, and he soon had 
the work beginning. A large via- 
duct was constructed over the ra- 
vine that separated the two roads, 
and the old County Road was put 
in excellent shape. The Water 



Works ran a main to the city limits, 
for it was evident that a newi 
residential district was beginning 
to form in this area. The time hadi 
come to build. 

Father Provincial now had thei 
means in sight, together with the 
endorsement of his Curia. A bene- 
factor had left us $20,000.00. Ann 
other promised $5,000 for the new 
building. An additional eight or 
ten thousand dollars was available 
at any time through the sale ofl 
certain lots in West Hoboken. He 
decided to begin construction im- 
mediately. 

Temporary quarters were set up 
in the adjacent buildings and work 
of wrecking the old building began 
on April 19,1905. It soon revealed 
how timely had been the warning 
of Mr. D. X. Murphy. The old 
Retreat was found to be in an 
advanced state of decay and dilapi- 
dation. The wreckers expressed 
surprise that it hadn't fallen aparti 
long before they arrived. Indeed, 
while three of them were airing 
their opinions on the second floor, 
a wall gave way and the joists came 
crashing down upon them, hurling 
them with such force and weight 
to the floor beneath as to make it 
appear almost miraculous that their 
lives were not crushed out. They 
crawled from the debris bruised 
and shaken, but there were no fatal- 
ities. The timbers supporting the 
Refectory ceiling were found in 
exactly the same condition. It 



328 



•Ml* 




7^ 



t*m> 



, i 



.$>T 



i* 




s a 

eS 

£ii 
si 

s.S 
_i •/. 

ei u . 
« «CU 
en SU 

a* ? 

a fa 
Ȥ^ 
£*§ 

* e- b 
N ?> c 

a g © 

"- . o 
o * - 

'-4- 3 T. 






^^ g 

a* 



« be 
S c 

£«£ 

— c o 
2 ° — 

a> be 

5^ 
bcTS 

"sic 

-.2 I 

** 'Si 

vg e 
S.2 * 



*£ 



hJT3 



«e 



seemed unbelievable that they had 
not collapsed long before. 

Nevertheless, there were enough 
good poplar joists in the old build- 
ing for the first and half the second 
floor of the new Retreat. Some 
160,000 brick, mostly from the more 
recent additions to the former 
building, were salvaged. The stone 
sills were usable. More noticeable, 
the four great pillars of Allegheny 
pine were saved for the portico of 
the new building. The rest was 



useless. The once beautiful olq 
building had first served as a baro- 
nial home in the days when Louis- 
ville was a trading post on the 
Falls of the Ohio. During the Civil 
War it had seen service as a hos- 
pital. Subsequently the Sisters of 
Mercy converted it into an academy, 
and later relinquished it to the 
Passionist Fathers. Now its beauty 
was gone. It was reduced to rubble 
and its ancient glory was no more. 
(to be continued) 



iiiiiiisi 



AD MULTOS ANNOS 

Mons. Antonio Geremia Pesce, Vicar Apostolic of Dodoma, Tanganyika, was 
born at Roche di Molare, in the Province of Allessandria, Italy, August 2, 1908. 
At the age of 14 he entered the Passionist Preparatory Seminary at Basella. 
He pronounced his vows on August 28, 1927. He was ordained to the priesthood 

September 24, 1932. 

His rapid ascent in the 
various offices and the 
Congregation are indica- 
tive of the splendid quali- 
ties of mind and soul dis- 
played by the new Bishop, 
and the esteem of his 
brethren. For several years 
he taught Canon Law and 
Holy Scripture, at the 
same time filling the office 
of Director of Students. 
During the past six years 
he has been Provincial of 
the Immaculate Heart of 
Mary Province, in North 
Italy. 

He was chosen Vicar 
Apostolic of Dodoma, Tan- 
ganyika, May 21, 1951. Ad 
multos annos! 




THE NUMBER OF THE NAILS 
(Continued from page 256) 

thesis could be proposed : the Cruci- 
fied, Who was, as it were, standing 
on the nails, tried to raise one foot 
a little and allow the weight to 
rest on the other in order to re- 
lieve the tremendous strain. (This 
is what we ourselves do when com- 
pelled to stand for a long period 
when we art tired.) Therefore, 
when the 'rigor mortis' set in, one 
of the legs would retain a shortened 
position. Or again : the 'sedile,' 
as we have said, was probably an 
integral part of the Roman cross. 
Its purpose was to support some 
of the weight of the body, and to 
relieve the strain upon the hands. 
This being the case, we might sug- 
gest that the weight would in- 
cline to one or other side of so 
narrow a projection, with a con- 
sequent stretching of one leg and 
a flexing of the other. This would 
also account for the larger wound 
in one foot. Tension would open 
one of the wounds while the pres- 
sure on the other lek would be re- 
lieved by the bending of the knee. 
Of course, these two latter solutions 
do not claim to be anything more 
than mere hypothesis. While the 
authenticity of the Holy Shroud 
itself can scarcely be doubted, it is 
difficult to say what degree of cre- 
dence can be accorded to the con- 
clusions sometimes drawn from the 
evidence which it affords. While 
we readily admit that the Holy 



Shroud does seem to favor one ra- 
ther than two nails through the 
feet, to say that "the Holy Shroud 
of Turin PROVES there were three 
nails Mi,i would seem to be an un- 
waranted assertion. Such an author- 
ity on the Shroud as Signor Giusep- 
pe Enrie, while quoting a passage 
of Dr. Brabet in which mention 
is made of the NAIL which pierced 
the feet, does not hesitate to speak 
of the fastening of the feet to the 
cross by NAILS. i7 Perhaps it would 
be better for the present to reserve 
judgement in this matter. 



THE MYSTICS 



It may be inter- 



esting to note what 
the mystics have to tell us about 
the number of the nails. It should 
be remembered, however, than an 
exact conformity between these ex- 
periences of the Saints and the 
conclusions of secular science is 
not to be expected. To do so would 
be to have an utterly false concep- 
tion of the significance of these 
mystical phenomena. The purpose 
of the stigmata, for example, "is 
not to reveal how Christ was 
wounded, but to confer the grace 
of intensified suffering with 
Christ." 38 As a matter of fact, we 
know that there have been many 
differences between the stigmata 
of the various Saints. Thus, the 
wounds on the feet of St. Francis 
appeared like two nail-heads. 89 St. 
Gemma's stigmata, on the contrary, 
seem to favor a single nail through 
the feet. 10 St. Bridget in vision 



331 



saw Christ pierced by four nails, 41 
while Catherine Emmerich de- 
scribed the piercing of the feet 
by a single nail. 42 These discrep- 
ancies do not in any way militate 
against the veracity or supernatural 
origin of the phenomena, but they 
do show us that we must not ex- 
pect to find a scientific mine in the 
writings and experiences of the 
mystics. 



CONCLUSION 



To sum up: it 
must be admitted 
that our sources of information are 



not such as to warrant any defiinite 
conclusion. Constant tradition, as 
we have seen, favours four nails. 
The popularity of the theory that 
our Saviour's feet were pierced by 
a single nail is to be attributed 
mainly to the works of the great 
artists who followed in the foot- 
steps of the Italian masters. Most 
moderns 43 hold for the traditional 
four. Perhaps it would be more 
prudent to adhere to this more com- 
mon opinion until such time as 
better evidence to the contrary can 
be adduced. 



l Ephesiaca, IV, 2. Quoted Prat: Jesus-Christ (1947), II, p. 529. Cf. Holzmeister: Verb. Dom., 
May 1934, p. 155. 2 Holzmeister, op. cit., p. 154. 3 Simon-Pardo: Prael. N. T., Vol. 1, p. 979. 
4 Luke, xxiv, 39 ; cf. Jn. xx, 25. 5 Justin, Apol., i, 35 ; Dial. c. Tryph., 97, 98, 104 ; Tert., 
Adv. Marc, iii 19 ; SS. Hilary Anthanasius, Ephrem, eusebius, etc. 6 Plautus : Mostellaria, Act 

II, Sc. 1, 12 sq. 7 Thus: Martin (Friedlieb) : Archeologie de la Passion, p. 314; Prat: op. 
cit.' p. 529 ; Fouard : The Christ the Son of Goal pp. 325, 326. 8 Fillion : Life of Christ, 

III, p. 534. 9 "Nos legimus Martyris clavos et multos quidem, ut plura fuerint vulnera quam 
membra." (Ruinart: Actta Martyr, III, 102. Quoted: Friedlieb: Archeologie de la Pass., 
p. 183.) 10 "Clavis sacros pedes terebrantibus," Serm. de Pass., inter opuscula, p. 83 (edit. 
Oxon.) 11 Article on the "Holy Nails," Cath. Encyc, Vol. X, p. 672. 12 Martin: op. cit., 
pp. 315, 316. 13 De Gloria Martyrum, cited by Martigny: Dictionnaire des antiquites Chretien- 
nes, p. 228. 14 Thurston, Article "Passion of Jesus Christ," Cath. Encyc, Vol. XI, p. 528. 
15 Martin: op. cit., p. 316; c|f. Corluy: comm. in Joan., p. 445 (footnote) ; Steenkiste: Ev. 
S. Matt., Q. 846, p. 1082. 16 De Obitu Theod., 47, Migna XVI, 1401. .17 Martin: op. cit., p. 309. 
18 De Ob. Theod., 47. 19 De Gloria Martyrum, 1, 6; Mirac. 1, 1. 20 Chronic, p. 20-21. 
21 Memoire sur les instruments de la Passion, p. 181. 22 Prof. Orazio Marucchi: Article on 
"Cross and Crucifix," Cath. Encyc, Vol. IX, p. 527. 23 Op. cit., p. 228. 24 Marucchi, ut supra, 
p. 529. 25 Martin, op. cit., p. 314. 26 Reinke: Die Messianischen Psalmen, in Ps. xxi, 17, 
p. 279. 27 Poelzl-Martindale: The Passion and Glory of Christ, p. 253; cf. Holzmeister, V. D., 
Aug. 1934, p. 249 ; Digest XLVIII, 24 : "De oadaveribus Punitorum" : "Corpora Animadvers- 
orum quibuslibet petentibus ad sepulturam danda sunt." Quoted by Fr. F. M. Braun, O. P., in 
"La Sepulture de Jesus," p. 14. 28 Martin, op. cit., p. 317. 29 Op. cit., p. 167. 30 John xix, 36. 
3l"An artist wishing to paint a Crucifixion in the modern Italian style tried to make his model 
pose by attaching one foot upon the other ; he told he could never succeed in arranging him 
in a suitable position. The legs turned outwards ; the strain upon the hands became enormous ; 
the stomach came forwards to such an extent that it would have been necessary to attach the 
body to the upright with a belt." R. de Fleury, op. cit., p. 167. 32 Lagrange: Comm. in S. 
Marc, xv, 20; cf. Holzmeister: V. D., May 1934, pp. 153, 154. 33 Giuseppe Ricclotti : Life 
of Christ (Milwaukee, 1944), p. 629. 34 Fr. W. V. MoEvoy, The Death Image of Christ, p. 53. 
35 E.g., Dr. Pierre Barbet ("Les Cinq Plaies du Christ",) Mgr. A. S. Barnes ("The Holy 
Shroud,") Dr. Caselli di Fano (in "La Civilta Catholica," 17/6/39). 36 Fr. McEvoy, loc cit. 
37 La Santa Sindone (1933), pp. 60-61. 38 Fr. McEvoy, op. cit., p. 95. 39Jorgenson: Life, 
p. 300. 40 Rev. Philip Coghlan, C.P. : Life, p. 73. 41 Revelations, Bk. 1, c 10. 42 The Dolorous 
Passion, Ch. XXXVIII. 43 Simon-Prado : Plael. Bibl., p. 979; Germanus : Praelectiones Hist., 
p. 292; Belser: History of the Passion, p. 518; Prat: Jesus-Christ, p. 529; Lagrange: Gosp. 
ace to St. Mark, xv, 24, p. 423; Fillion: Life of Christ (1929), III, p. 534; Fouard: The 
Christ the Son of God, II, p. 326; Steenkiste: Comm. in Matt., Q. 846, p. 1083. Friedlieb, 
Hug and Zoeckler favor the contrary opinion. 



332 



CHAPLET OF THE FIVE 
WOUNDS 

(Continued from page 274) 
priests outside the Congregation 
to bless the Five Wound Beads, 
no longer have any force. 

The Rite of Blessing 

RITE OF th Fi Wound Beads 
BLESSING vvouiiu Deaub 

is a very short one, but 
there is no obligation to make use 
of it. 1 - A single sign of the Cross 
suffices, both for the blessing and 
the application of the indulgences. ™ 
Our Collectio Caeremoniarum et 
Precum contains the following rite. 

As in this case, where no special 
stole in indicated, the general rule 
is that in all blessings outside the 
Mass, the priest puts on at least 
a surplice and a stole of the color 
of the day. 11 

V. Adjutorium nostrum in no- 
mine Domini. 

R. Qui fecit coelum et terram. 

V. Dominus vobiscum. 

R. Et cum spiritu tuo. 
Oremus 

Rogamus te, Domine sancte, 
Pater omnipotens, aeterne Deus, ut 
has Coronas quinque vulnerum di- 
lectissimi Filii tui Domini nostri 
Jesu Christi bene * dicere digneris, 
ut qui eas recitaverint, meritis Pas- 
sionis ejusdem Filii tui, gratiam 
in praesenti et aeternam gloriam 
obtineant in futurum. Per eumdem 
Christum Dominum nostrum. 
R.Amen. 

The beads are then sprinkled 
with holy water. 18 



The recita- 
BEADS IN OTHER f . * ., 

PRIVILEGES *T °* th " 

Five Wound 

Beads enters into other privileges 

in our Collectio Facultatum et In- 

dulgentiarum. 

The first applies only to the Mis- 
sionaries. No. 91 says that "as 
often as we have the privilege to 
recite the Small Office, we may com- 
mute it to the recitation of five 
decades of the Rosary of the Bless- 
ed Virgin Mary, and the Five 
Wound Beads." The Collectio in- 
dicates that the Father General, 
using his power to interpret and 
moderate our Privileges, has lim- 
ited the use of this privilege to 
"during the time of the Mission 
only." This means that during the 
time of the Mission, (No. 88) the 
Missionary may, with the permis- 
sion of the Superior of the Mis- 
sion, 1 " commute his Little Office to 
the recitation of five decades of 
the Rosary and the Five Wound 
Beads. 

The second applies to all the 
members of the Congregation who 
are bound to the Office. No. 92 
says that "All the religious of our 
Congregation can recite, in place 
of the Office of the day, five decades 
of the Rosary of the Blessed Virgin 
Mary, the Seven Dolor Beads and 
the Five Wound Beads, as often as 
they travel for seven or eight hours 
during the day." 

NEW BEADS It is well to note 

CONDEMNED here that the recent 



383 



(1939) decree of the Holy Office 
condemning a certain "Rosary 
of the Holy Wounds," does not 
refer to our Passionist Five 
Wound Beads. This is evident 
from the fact that the Car- 
dinals of the Holy Office, in their 
decree forbidding the new Rosary, 
were following out an earlier de- 
cree, of May 26, 1937, "de novis 
cultus seu devotionis formulis non 
introducendis, deque inolitis in re 
abusibus tollendis." 17 On the other 
hand, our Five Wound Beads has 
been approved by special documents 
by the Holy See, and is found in 
the Collection of Prayers and Pious 
Works, n. 96, which the Sacred 
Congregation of Indulgences de- 
clared genuine and authentic by 
its decree of June 23, 1898. In the 
latest authentic collection, edited 
by the Sacred Penitentiary on Dec. 
31, 1937, there is no mention of the 
Five Wound Beads, because this 
collection excludes indulgences "the 
gaining of which require the bless- 
ing of some priest, whether regular 
or secular, imparted to the object 
of piety." 18 

The decree of the Holy Office, 
therefore, seems to refer to a cer- 
tain new form of devotion, called 
the Rosary of the Holy Wounds 
or the Rosary of Mercy. This new 



CONCLUSION 



Chaplet, consisting of ejaculatory 
prayers only, and claiming many 
magnificent promises from God, was 
achieving much publicity during the 
period shortly before the decree. 

From all that has 
been said, it is evi- 
dent that the Five Wound Beads 
is a very practical means of pur- 
suing the purpose for which it was 
instituted — promoting devotion to 
the Passion of Our Divine Lord. 
The time required to recite the 
Beads is very short, and the medi- 
tation required is very simple, be- 
cause of the very specific nature 
of its object — the Five Wounds. 
Moreover, the indulgences attached 
to the recitation of the Beads are 
not unattractive. Nevertheless, it 
seems that, in this country at least, 
this Passionist devotion is at a 
comparatively low ebb. Undoubtedly 
this is due in part to the ever- 
increasing interest in the Rosary 
of Our Blessed Lady, with which 
the Five Wound Beads was never 
meant to compete. It may be due 
also to a lack of interest in the 
Beads, or even to ignorance on the 
part of many of us. Whatever the 
cause, a little zeal will show us 
what an excellent means we have 
to spread devotion to the Passion 
and Sufferings of Christ. 

Rev. Fr. Warren, C.P. 



1 Acta Congregationis, Vol. XIV, p. 263ff. 2 Ibid., p. 268. 3 Ibid., p. 265. 4 Ibid., p. 267. 
5 Ibid., p. 270. 6 Ibid., p. 268. 7 S. C. Indulg., Feb. 29, 1820 ; 5. Paenit., Dec. bv, vtbe. 
8 S. C. Indulg., Jan. 10, 1839. 9 Acta Congr., Vol. XIV, p. 265. 10 Ibid., p. 273. 11 A. A. S., 
Vol., XXV, p. 170 ; Acta Congr., Vol. XII, p. 108. 12 Collectio Cacremon,. p. 106. 13 Collectio 
Facultatum et Indulgentiarum, p. 37, n. 26. i4Cf. The Priest's new Ritual, P. J. Kennedy and 
Sons, New York, 1947, p. 239. 15 Collectio Carerevt., ut supra. ic Collectio Facultatum N, 91, 
p. 96. 17 A. A. S., Vol. XXXII, p. 24. 18 Preces et Pia Opera, 1938, p. VII, Praenotanda I; 

334 



BROTHER ISIDORE: MAN OF 
GOD'S WILL 

(Continued from page 280) 

rejoice together once more on that 
glorious day. 

Dear Parents do not come here 
with any sign of sorrow ; come with 
a joyful heart to consummate the 
sacrifice you have made to God so 
willingly and without holding back, 
because it is His Holy Will. So we 
will win great merit for heaven. 

As for me everything is going 
fine. I am so well accustomed to 
life here, it is as though I have 
always lived here. For some two 
months now I have been gardener. 
It doesn't make any difference to 
me what kind of work I do but 
one can always have some prefer- 
ence: this work and this planting 
in the garden suits me fine. 

Also, dear Parents, Brother and 
Sister, if any trouble disturbs us 
or if we have something to suffer, 
let us look at the suffering of Our 
Lord Jesus Christ and the sorrows 
of Mary when we make the Way 
of the Cross. Then we will realize 
all that they have done for us, 
only for our good. It we want to 
follow in their footsteps we must 
also suffer to be able to take part 
in their glory. 

Would you please write whether 
you will come or not, and about how 
many people ; and if my Aunt 
Josephine will accompany you as 
she has said. 



I greet all of you in Our Lord 
Jesus Christ. 

Your Son, 
Isidore 

Br. Isidore of St. Joseph was 
professed September 15, 1908. His 
father and mother were present. 

As a professed Brother some- 
times he was cook, sometimes he 
was gardener, sometimes he was 
porter. Sometimes he was all three. 

"I always do my best. We broth- 
ers really have a great obligation 
to take the best possible care of 
the things confided to us. Now that 
I have made the sacrifice of leaving 
you I must give everything rather 
than half. 

When I rise at night for Matins 
my first prayer is: 'My Lord and 
My God, I offer you everything: 
my joy, my sorrow, my happiness 
and my pains in holy union with 
the life, the sufferings and death 
of Our Lord Jesus Christ.' 

In doing all my work for the 
glory of God, I help in the con- 
version of sinners and arousing de- 
votion to the Passion of Our Lord 
Jesus Christ and to the Sorrows of 
Mary. For while the Fathers go 
to preach someone must pray and 
work to keep up the community. 
You understand well enough the 
importance of our work and our 
efforts and I desire nothing so much 
as to try with all my strength to 
attain that end. I wish to offer in 
holocaust the hardest sacrifices and 
even my life, if that be necessary." 



335 



1909. "I am beginning to under- 
stand a little French and I even 
try, very prudently to say some- 
thing in that language. I have been 
porter for three days and you 
should have seen how the people 
looked strangely at me when I 
spoke French. When I had no time 
to reflect on my words I got all 
jumbled up and mixed in French 
and Flemish as it came to mind." 

In December, 1910 he was sud- 
denly moved from Ere. 

"Friday evening I received news 
unexpectedly that I was to leave 
definitely for our house of Wesem- 
beek Sunday morning. You can 
understand what went through my 
mind. I lost my appetite over it 
and couldn't sleep a wink all night. 
Certainly Our Lord noticed that 
at this point I was beginning to 
become attached to our farm of 
Ere. I sometimes thought myself 
indispensable here. I had every- 
thing so well in hand for planting 
and sowing after winter, and now 
all of a sudden it it finished! But 
as soon as the thought came to me 
that God willed it through the will 
of my Superiors, it became so great 
and so good that I could not hide 
my joy at being able to leave for 
our monastery of Wesembeek." 

Wesembeek 
1911 
J.C.P. 
Dear Parents, Brother and Sister, 

With God's help I am setting to 
work to give you some news of 



myself and some satisfaction, for 
it is not true at all that absence 
makes affection decline. On the 
contrary the longer the time the 
more love increases. 

This is all very well but it must 
not go too far since we do not 
live for what lasts only a moment. 
We must love God above everything 
else and do His Holy Will before 
everything else. That is why as 
Mother writes : It is by remaining 
submissive to the Will of God that 
we go the furthest. For how many 
desires are there that a man cannot 
cherish because they are not possi- 
ble to realize nor permitted. What 
would one not wish in the way of 
health and wealth, but by that one 
does not possess them. There is 
one thing which we must force our- 
selves to realize with all our being : 
the salvation of our soul. Besides 
aren't we conscious of the fact 
that everything here on earth 
is vanity? And when God sends 
us His trials and His, crosses 
it makes no difference whether we 
are young and healthy or old and: 
ill ; we cannot escape. That is why] 
we should submit ourselves with; 
resignation and abandonment to thei 
Will of God and say : Divine Provi- 
dence has so disposed things. 

I have learned also that Father 
was not well. I hope the bad mo- 
ment has already passed. What he 
has can pass quickly but it can 
also become very serious. It is a 
cross for Father. I hope he will 



336 



not stop carrying it patiently. It 
is true also that you, Father and 
Mother are walking little by little 
to your old age and then one can 
count upon all sorts of evils and 
miseries. It is up to you now Frans 
and Stephania to comfort and sup- 
port them ; it is your greatest 
duty. For my part I will pray for 
your well-being in the measure that 
it be profitable for you. 

I must now write you what hap- 
pened to me these last weeks. At 
first I thought I would say nothing 
to you so as not to frighten you. 
But I do not think that would be 
right for you are not children. You 
would not do well to be disturbed 
over it. If God wills things this 
way I submit myself to Him with- 
out complaint and so must you. 

You remember how I used to 
have boils and abcesses from time 
to time. Well, I had some of them 
again. For some time I felt a pain 
in my right eye. It would last for 
two or three days and then sud- 
denly go away for some weeks. 
Well, the last time I wrote it started 
again. I thought it would soon be 
over but no; at the end of four 
days it had grown so bad that we 
^vent to see an eye-doctor in Brus- 
sels. After a careful examination 
he asked me if I could still see out 
of that eye. I wasn't too sure since 
I had it covered over. I did not 
even care to try. The doctor told 
me: 'You will never see again out 
of that eye. The globe that lets 



the light in is completely clouded.' 
After covering the good eye I had 
to admit : 'I can see nothing.' There 
was a hemorrhage in the middle 
of the eye. 'Well,' the Doctor con- 
tinued, 'your eye is lost. You can 
come here to the Institute to be 
treated and I will take care of you. 
We will see if there is any hope of 
saving the eye. If nothing can be 
done I will perform a slight opera- 
tion to save the organ though you 
will not be able to use it any longer 
for sight. If that does not suc- 
ceed we will have to take out the 
eye.' 

We left there. Fr. Superior said 
to me : 'First, let's go to another 
doctor and see if this is really 
true.' He took me to a renowned 
occulist. After a long examination 
he declared very briefly: 'There 
is a hemorrhage in the eye. It is 
lost. It must be operated on and 
removed.' This time we knew e- 
nough. Fr. Superior took me that 
same day to the Institute of the 
Sisters of Our Lady of Mercy to 
be treated there by the first Doctor. 
At the Institute I had a room all 
to myself where I was exceptionally 
well cared for with food and drink 
by the good Sisters. I felt like a 
prince in that sumptuous room. 
Then for three days the doctor 
tried everything to find out if I 
could still see from my bad eye. 
The room was entirely darkened. 
I could leave it only in the morning 
to go to Holy Communion and Holy 



337 



Mass. At the end of three days 
the Doctor told me : 'All hope of 
making the eye still useable is gone. 
Now I will perform a slight opera- 
tion to save the organ without your 
suffering any more from it.' That 
lasted about ten minutes. After it 
was over the pain lessened for three 
days. But after that it grew worse 
again. They used all kinds of balms 
and pungent liquids but nothing 
happened. Nine days later the doc- 
tor said he had to take out the 
eye and could wait no longer lest 
the other eye be endangered. He 
told me he would operate the next 
morning about eleven o'clock. That 
morning I went to confession and 
Communion. I offered the eye to 
God in reparation for my sins and 
for your well-being, spiritual and 
temporal ; and also for many other 
intentions. I submitted docily to 
the Will of God. Why should I 
be sad? At eleven I was taken to 
the operating room where I pre- 
pared myself alone. I got up on 
the operating table and had no 
fear in facing the ordeal. 

There were two doctors and one 
sister. They began by putting me 
to sleep. After five minutes I was 
unconscious and I do not know what 
they did then. When I awoke three- 
quarters of an hour later the sis- 
ters were busy carrying me in a 
bed on a little cart. They told me 
everything had gone along fine. All 
that afternoon I was very ill at 
ease. It was the matter they had 



used to put me to sleep which re- 
mained in my body. I had no painl 
in the eye; nothing but a strange! 
sensation. Besides it had a good 
dressing. 

The next day, Sunday, I received] 
Holy Communion in bed. A little 
later the sisters told me : 'If you 
feel able you can go to Mass.' I 
went. My legs were still a little 
weak and my head spun a little,; 
but all things considered, I got 
along all right. The next day the 
bandages were removed and the sis^ 
ter washed the wound carefully.! 
Then she said : 'Take a little look! 
in the mirror.' I looked. Where the 
eye had been was a hole in my 
head. I remained there a week 
longer ; then I returned to the mon- 
astery. There I rested some days 
and now for four days I have been 
cook again and everything is prac-: 
tically healed. Next Thursday we 
will go to Brussels to make ar- 
rangements for a new glass eye,; 
and so everything will be finishedJ 

To tell you the truth I do not see 
as well as before, but I can always 
see well enough to do all my work; 
The doctor told me later that iti 
was not a hemorrhage as he had 
thought, but in the course of the 
operation he discovered an abcess 
or a boil which had ruined the 
globe of the eye through which the 
light passed. As soon as he saw 
this he felt reassured for the other 
eye. Otherwise since the eyes are 
joined together, the blood might 



338 



ave been able to enter the other 
ne. 

I have told you everything that 
appened since it might interest 
ou as well as myself. 

And now let us pray for one an- 
ther so that we can make the offer- 
ig of all our sufferings and our 
ains for the greater glory of God. 

With all my heart I send you 
ly kind remembrances. 

Your son and devoted brother in 
)ur Lord. 

Br. Isidore. 

His real trouble was of course, 
ancer. As the doctor had predicted 
o his Superior it broke out again 
ve years later in the intestines. 
le quietly, cheerfully bore with the 
teadily increasing pain until one 
light between Wednesday and 
Thursday his Superior said: "Br. 



Isidore, now I give you permission 
to go to Heaven." Full of joy he 
raised his hands and said quietly : 
"To Heaven! Yes, to Heaven!" 
About one o'clock he asked for the 
Religious to come in. He was seated 
in an arm-chair to ease the pain 
a little. He begged pardon for all 
the trouble he had caused the Reli- 
gious and promised to pray for 
them in Heaven. "Take courage Br. 
Isidore, we are going to heaven," 
his Superior told him. "0 Yes," he 
replied, raising up a little, to Heav- 
en." 

Fifteen minutes before he died 
all his sufferings ceased. Then 
quietly, submissively, as he had 
lived, with scarcely anyone noticing 
it, he died. It was October 6, 1916. 
Thirty-four years later, October 6, 
1950 the formal inquiry into his 
life and virtues was begun.* 



* This was mostly a translation from the booklet "Le Servitur de Dieu Frere Isidore de Saint 
oseph" par le R. P. Ange, C.P. traduit du Neerlandais par P.H. d. L. 




INDULGENCES 

The Sacred Apostolic Penitentiary, is answer to the request of the Procurator 
Jeneral, recently granted, for seven years, the following indulgences: 

1. A partial indulgence of 300 days may be gained by the members of the 
Congregation each time they shall recite devoutly and with sorrow of heart the 
nvocation: "May the Passion of Our Lord Jesus Christ be ever in our hearts;" 
!. A plenary indulgence, under the usual conditions, may be gained once a month 
f they shall piously recite the same invocation each day throughout the month. 
[Cf. News, Provincial Curia, this issue.) 

339 



OUT OF PRINT 

(Continued from page 289) 

have signed her name to. Then why 
should a publisher foist this upon 
a public who may even believe what 
the blurb states, that this ex-monk 
and apostate from the Church was 
able to "seek and obtain release 
from his vows ?" The publisher has 
done a service to neither history nor 
apologetics — not even to scandal- 
seeking curiosity. 

A strange footnote to this re- 
view: this autobiography's pub- 
lication date was September 24. 
Had John Tettemer lived, and were 
he still a faithful priest, on Sep- 
tember 21 he would have been cele- 
brating his Golden Jubliee of Or- 
dination — "the supreme moment of 
my life." 

(Reprinted by permission of 
America.) 



AN INTERESTING APOLOGETICS 
WORK 

OUR idea of distributing Catholic 
literature at bus terminals, 
etc., originated in a meeting of 
the Little Flower Conference of the 
St. Vincent de Paul Society fifteen 
or twenty years ago. When our 
Particular Council started a "Spe- 
cial Works Committee" this activity 
was spotlighted and several parish 
Conferences took it up. 

We accumulate surplus papers 
and purchase extra copies of "Our 
Sunday Visitor." Our members 



save their "Registers," magazines, 
etc., and some of the Catholic 
schools have the students bring in- 
recent clean magazines, such as 
"The Sign," "Ligourian," "Amer- 
ica," "Social Order," "Sacred Heart 
Messenger," "The Grail," "Sparks," 
"The Holy Family," "Ave Maria," 
and others — also pamphlets by The 
Queen's Work, etc. 

We procure questionnaire cards 
from Father Edgar of the Passion- 
ist Preparatory Seminary, 7101 
Natural Bridge Road, St. Louis, 
and staple these cards in the papers. 

The card contains a check-list of 
12 popular questions about the 
Church, replies to which will be 
sent on request, no charge. 

At our regular weekly meetings 
each of our twelve active members 
takes a bundle or two of the papers^ 
etc., (25 in each) and services a 
certain rack or two on his way to 
or from work. 

These boxes or holders are hornet 
made of sheet aluminum, galvanized 
iron, wood or steel. If out in the 
open, we have shields for protection 
against the weather. The word 
"Free" is painted on them — nothing 
else. 

... In our bundles we try to inter- 
sperse colored magazines to catch 
the eye. The type of literature is 
not too important as long as it 
is Catholic — we believe it is the 
questionnaire card that gets re- 
sults. . . . 

In the three years that we have 



340 



)ncentrated on this special work, 
jr little conference has been in- 
;rumental in making several known 
mverts. One is now in the reli- 
ious life. 

Over 1200 inquiries have been 
andled and almost 300 readers 
ave applied for the correspondence 
)urse conducted by the Passionist 
athers. Inquiries have come in 
rom every state, Alaska, Hawaii 
rid India. 

We notice that workers who come 
1 from Kentucky, Tennessee, Ar- 
ansas and Missouri mountain dis- 
•icts, mail in quite a number of 
irds asking for answers. So we 
sel some good is being done in 
reaking down the ignorance and 
igotry still existent in the "Bible 
elt." We also believe that many 
ersons pick up our matter who 
ould never think of investigating 
irough a priest. 

(Taken from "Catholic Action," 
eptember, 1951, p. 11.) 



EPORT TAKEN FROM A LETTER 

^Testerday (June 1) was my 23rd 
I anniversary as pastor of St. 
oseph's Mission, New Bern, North 
arolina. 

All day long my thoughts trav- 
lled back to that warm day (June 
, 1928) when I stood at the altar 
nd was introduced to my new 
arish of about a dozen souls! I 
r as scared! 



The work, and everything else, 
was so new to me. And all looked 
so primitive and crude. A Protes- 
tant altar boy served the Mass! 

After meeting the people I re- 
turned to the Rectory. Shortly, I 
counted the collection — not quite 
$3.00! Fear gripped my heart as 
I inquired of my predecessor: "Fa- 
ther, how am I to run this place?" 
His answer I'll never forget: 
"That's for you to look after!" The 
twelve dollars, then, in my pocket, 
just wouldn't go far! That night as 
I knelt before Our Dear Lord in 
the Tabernacle, I prayed for 
strength and courage — and it was 
given to me to know that He would 
be my "Changeless Friend." 

Looking back over the years that 
followed, I can imagine that, then 
and there, He made His plans for 
me. "You must work and sweat, 
because I'll require a price for 
every soul you gain for Me. The 
price will be suffering." How true 
was that plan realized! For every 
soul gained I did pay a price. But, 
I am happy ; so happy that we now 
number 350 souls in our Parish! 

The year 1943 stands out as a 
nightmare. After working to im- 
prove and enlarge the Mission, 
spending many a night writing 
appeals to friends for help, after 
seeing the results in a nice, pretty 
lay-out, after all this — fire! My 
"dream mission" tumbled down on 
my head! Fire! ! I will never for- 
get the morning after the fire. 



341 



Church and school gone up in 
smoke! The Sisters, the parish- 
ioners, the children — all stood and 
gazed on the ruins, and cried! 

A little "first-grader" ran up to 
me, placed a nickel in my hand 
and said: "Father, this is for a 
new school." That gift started it! 
Within a year we had a new Church 
and School — bigger and better than 
ever — thanks to the many bene- 
factors who came to our rescue. 

Yes, the fire proved to be Holy 
"Smoke!" And, daily, we pray for 
all who made possible our new plant 
— a Church and School, of which 
we are justly proud. Within a week 
we shall have Graduation Exercises 
for six pupils. They will receive 
diplomas that are recognized by 
the State. This is, now, an accred- 
ited School; if you please! 

Now, on the occasion of my 23rd 
anniversary, I find that I have just 
twelve dollars in my pocket! Lady 
Poverty insists on remaining in the 
priest-house! So, I will wear the 
"Crown of thorns" — mental worry 
over finances! But, I have much, 
very much to be thankful for — 
don't you think? God has blessed 
the Mission in so many ways. I 
now have two very zealous assist- 
ants: Rev. Michael Campbell, C.P., 
and Rev. Peter Quinn, C.P. I have 
six Sisters teaching our darlings. 
We are blessed with a fervent group 
of adult converts. 

As I close this letter I am sing- 
ing a "Te Deum" of praise to God 



for His goodness to me. Bui 
"ouch"! There on the wall, hang 
the calendar which tells me tha 
the tenth of the month will sooi 
be with us ; and there, in the draw 
er of my desk, it a stack of bills 
waiting to be paid; and, there, I 
the cash-box, a pocketbook that i; 
so sick that even an aspirin won' 
help! Oh, well! St. Joseph is mj 
stand-by! He will not let me down 
Pardon the long letter, friend. ! 
wanted to chat with you on tin 
anniversary-day — because you ant 
your friends have always meant s< 
much to me! You are my "Life 
savers" ! 

(Reprinted from July issue oJ 
OUR COLORED MISSIONS) 



SWEET ARE THESE TEARS 

Sweet Are These Tears. The storj 
of Mother Seton. By Raphael Grashoffl 
C.P. The Grail, St. Meinrad, Indiana 

The title of this life is taker 
from a letter of Mother Setom 
but it must not be imagined thai 
she was of the lachrymal kind. If 
is true that there are many things 
that need to be seen with eyes that 
have shed tears. Christ Himseh 
has wept. I pity "the stoic of the 
woods, the man without a tear.' 
But the fact is that Elizabeth Ann 
Seton was of a jovial, humorous! 
disposition. "I shall be wild BettjJ' 
to the last breath," she wrote, and 
to do her justice, she was. 

"Perhaps," said Theodore May-; 



342 



nard, "that is why she is now one 
of the American candidates for 
canonization." And he is right, for 
sanctity which is sanity ever ex- 
cludes sadness. A saint who would 
be sad would surely be sadly in 
need of sanctity. I am sure that 
the "sweet tears" shed by Mother 
Seton were merely liquid laughter 
wiped out of her eyes. She was 
born in New York City on August 
28, 1774, the daughter of Doctor 
Richard Bailey, and therefore a 
connection of the Roosevelts. When 
L9 she married William Seton, a 
well-to-do merchant. He died of 
consumption in Italy in 1803, hav- 
ing lost most of his fortune and 
eaving his widow with five chil- 
iren to support. Her reception into 
ihe Church, which occurred soon 
ifterwards, cut her off from aid 
from her relatives ; so for the sake 
)f a livelihood she started a school 
n New York City. 

In 1808, however, prompted by 
Bishop Carroll, she went to Balti- 
nore, where she opened an acad- 
emy in a house adjoining St. Mary's 
College. Her conversion had been 
argely effected by correspondence 
vith Bishop Cheverus of Boston. 
3ut the initial Catholic influence 
vas that of the Filicchi brothers 
)f Leghorn in Italy, business 
friends of her husband. 

But now, unbidden comes the 
;hought that instead of tracing a 
jkeleton from the Life of Mother 



Seton as the foundress of the first 
distinctly American religious or- 
der of women, the Sisters of Char- 
ity, it seems much better to refer 
our readers to Father Raphael's 
present interesting and instructive 
booklet. So timely it is, and so 
uncostly, that anyone can purchase 
a copy from the Grail. Our new 
author, a devoted son of St. Paul 
of the Cross, is developing a new 
method in Biography. In a nutshell 
it is this : the whole body of facts 
is reviewed, then comes a deliber- 
ate balancing of pro and con, and 
then, of a sudden, a living man 
emerges. The limits of accuracy 
are simply the limits of knowledge. 
Decidedly we are far from the dry 
as dust, the tedious formula of old. 

Father Raphael's "Twentieth 
Century St. Agnes," a sketch of 
St. Mary Goretti, is well received 
these days. We beg leave to recom- 
mend it. His "Challenge of Fatima" 
has had three printings in one 
year. He is now engaged in writing 
the life of Blessed Pope Pius X. 
We salute it in advance. But it will 
be difficult for him to give us a 
better piece of work than the pres- 
ent one of Dear Mother Seton, 
who, we hope, may be, in God's 
will, the first American-born of the 
United States to be raised to the 
honor of our altars. 

J. M. Lelen 

(Reprinted from "Our Sunday 
Visitor" ) 



343 



JAPAN AND THE FOREIGN 
MISSIONS 

IT WAS in the year 1549, on Au- 
gust 15, the feast of the Assump- 
tion of the Blessed Virgin Mary, 
that St. Francis Xavier landed at 
Kagoshima. What emotion must 
have filled his heart on that day 
of Our Lady when he beheld the 
picturesque land rising before him. 
He was later to say of the people 
of Japan, "These are the best peo- 
ple so far discussed, and it seems 
to me that among unbelievers no 
people can be found to excell them/' 

On that eventful day, a little over 
four hundred years ago, he hum- 
bly began his apostolate with 
prayer, mortification and hard work 
— confident in the power and good- 
ness of Christ who sent him on 
this mission of obedience. 

Coming to observe the people 
more closely, there were qualities 
about them that must have pleased 
the refined Xavier. They were dig- 
nified, intellectual, active, gener- 
ous, courteous. Yet, beneath the 
calm exterior, he read and pitied 
the restlessness and the turmoil of 
unsatisfied souls. These creatures, 
whom he hoped to enroll under the 
banner of the Cross, were slaves 
of Buddhism. Against this false 
religion, as well as against Shinto- 
ism, Xavier was called to make a 
gentle warfare. His commission 
was to teach of the good God who 
loves all, and who died that all 
might be saved. 



After a loving labor of two anq 
a half years in this land of tha 
Rising Sun, St. Francis left this 
mission in charge of Father Cos^ 
mas de Torres and Brother Juan 
Fernandez, and returned to Goai 
He never came back to the land of( 
which he wrote, "Of Japan, if I 
were to speak to you, I would neven 
end. ... I write of a subject that is 
most dear to me — of Japanese* 
Christians, my delights." St. Fran- 
cis Xavier died in the year 1552. 

The Shogun Oda Nobunaga was! 
very friendly to Christianity, but 
his death in 1582 brought on the 
emperor of Japan who persecuted] 
the Church, the fierce Shogun Hide-i 
yoshi who issued an edict banishing! 
all Jesuits. By the time the worst 
persecutor of the Church ascended: 
the throne and began the final ex- 
termination of the Church in Japan: 
in the year 1614, there were nearly] 
1,000,000 Christians. Shogun Ie- 
yasu filled the earth with terror i 
and martyred many — over 250,000. , 
The reason of the persecutions wag 
political. The Shoguns were told f 
that the priests were simply to 
pave the way for European con- ■ 
quest — a rumor which the Protes- 
tant traders, namely the Dutch and | 
English, fanned to white heat. 
(Mourret-Thompson, Volume VI) 

In 1640 four Portugese ambassa- 
dors with a suite of seventy-four 
men came to Nagasaki. They were 
condemned to death. Among them 
was St. Philip of Mexico. Thirteen 



344 



sailors were exempted from the 
massacre and were sent to China 
with this warning: "So long as 
the sun warms the earth, let no 
Christian be so daring as to enter 
Japan. Let it be known to all that, 
were it the Spanish King, nay, 
the God of the Christians, or the 
great Shaki (i.e. Buddha) himself, 
he would not be able to break this 
law without suffering the death 
penalty." 

The ports of Japan were closed. 
For over two hundred years the 
country remained in seclusion. To- 
ward 1650 the Christian religion 
was regarded extinct in the land, 
yet high rewards were promised to 
anyone denouncing a Christian. The 
surviving Christians, hidden in the 
mountains, still kept the Faith, and 
waited longingly for spiritual com- 
fort. Although several attempts 
were made to aid them, martyrdom 
and tortures befell all who tried. 

In the year 1852 Commodore 
Perry of the United States Navy 
sailed to Japan and delivered to 
the Shogun papers from President 
Fillmore proposing a treaty for the 
opening of commercial relations. 
In 1855 the treaty was completely 
ratified by both countries. The first 
Japanese ports were opened under 
modern conditions. Missionaries 
came again. 

A church was soon erected at 
Nagasaki and dedicated to the 
Twenty-six Japanese Martyrs 
(those beatified by Holy Church). 



It was in this Church that the inci- 
dent so famous in Church History 
took place. Father Petitjean, an 
army chaplain for the French sol- 
diers, was in charge of the church 
that memorable St. Patrick's Day 
of 1865. A group of natives ap- 
proached him, attracted by the 
Cross on top of the church. They 
asked to see the statue of the Holy 
Mary. Delighted to find a statue 
of the Blessed Mother in the 
Church, they said, "We are of the 
same heart as you. There are many 
more of us in Urakami." With this 
they departed. 

A delegate was sent back by the 
Christians buried in the mountains 
— descendants of the first Japanese 
Christians who had preserved the 
Faith for more than two hundred 
years, baptizing their children and 
marrying among themselves in se- 
cret. They even prayed the Rosary 
in common — using abacus boards 
and interrupting their prayers oc- 
casionally to avoid suspicion. There 
is nothing in Church History quite 
like this story of the Nagasaki 
Christians. 

The delegate asked Father Petit- 
jean if it was the Great Chief of 
Rome who sent him. He answered 
that it was. Then the delegate 
wanted to know if the Father had 
any children. He said that he did 
not. 

Hastening back to the Christians 
in the hills, their representative 
told them that the man fulfilled the 



345 



requirements which their ancestors 
were given as signs by the exiled 
missionaries long ago. The mis- 
sionaries had promised the natives 
that others like them would come 
come and the way to recognize 
them would be their devotion to 
the Virgin Mary, their loyalty to 
the Pope of Rome, and their being 
unmarried. Obviously these marks 
served to distinguish the priests 
from the evangelizing personnel of 
the Protestants. 

News of this hidden band of 
Christians was carried by wireless 
around the world. Again a ruth- 
less, but shortlived, persecution 
broke out when the Japanese gov- 
ernment learned of this hated sect. 
In March of 1873, once for all, the 
persecution of Christians ended, 
and there was religious toleration. 
Nagasaki was the only fertile field 
for conversions, the rest, of Japan 
remained slow and hesitant in ac- 
cepting the Faith. Among the in- 
telligentsia Lutheranism made 
headway — perhaps due to the prev- 
alence of Kantian philosophy in 
these circles as well as a quasi- 
acceptance of western culture and 
religion. 

In . an article in the May issue 
1951 of Worldmission, edited by 
Bishop Sheen, there is a very inter- 
esting treatment of the outlook of 
the intelligentsia of Japan. The 
article is entitled "The Spiritual 
Background of Japan's Intelligent- 
sia" by Supreme Court Justice 



Kotaro Tanaka, Ph.D., LL.D. Thej 
resume of this article may be help-i 
ful in understanding the problems ; 
the Church in that country will I 
have to cope with as regards phil-l 
osophy and religion. 

"One of the most remarkable 
features of Christianity in Japan I 
since the restoration of the Meijii 
Restoration over 80 years ago isl 
that notwithstanding the tremen- 
dous efforts of Christian mission- 
aries the number of Christians to- 
day does not exceed 300,000 (thei 
number of Catholics about 130,000) 
in a population of 83 million. A 
discussion of this fact and itsj 
causes has both a theoretical andj 
practical interest in so far as the 
conclusions reached from a care- 
ful analysis may offer some useful 
suggestions to the missionaries for 
making their apostolate more effi- 
cient and fruitful. . . . 

. . . The majority of Japanese 
Portestants have very little knowl- 
edge of things Catholic, and no 
reason to protest against the 
Church. ... If these sincere Protes- 
tants have a chance to come in 
contact with our religion we can. 
expect that many of them will be- 
come dissatisfied with their sub- 
jective and materialistic faith. 
Briefly, Japanese Protestants may 
be regarded as a fertile field for 
Catholic Action. 

"We said that World War I 
brought to Japan enormous wealth 
and prosperity. Many young schol- 



346 



ars went abroad to perfect their 
studies; every kind of new thought 
and cultural tendency was im- 
ported. . . . 

"In the study of morality, schol- 
ars were subjectivistic, relativistic 
or skeptic. In the study of law 
their methods were exegetic, anal- 
ytic and anti-metaphysical. Con- 
cerning political science their atti- 
tude was completely empiric, ma- 
terialistic and amoral. For them the 
''critical spirit" meant nothing else 
but "anti-religious." The popular- 
ity of the Neo-Kantian philosophy 
for some years after World War 
I might be attributed to the fact 
that this kind of philosophy is able 
to satisfy two demands of young 
Japanese scholars; the demand for 
a vague, abstract philosophy and 
the demand for a method that is 
scientific, i.e., positivistic and ma- 
terialistic. 

"Because the name 'social science' 
has been monopolized by the Marx- 
ist doctrine, it is no wonder that 
during the last 30 years a consider- 
able part of the Japanese intelli- 
gentsia and students have been very 
interested in this historical materi- 
alism of Karl Marx. Over a million 
copies of Das Kapital — of course 
in its Japanese translation — were 
sold in a few years. 

"From all that has been said 
above we may conclude that the 
philosophical systems which have 
shown themselves in Japan for 
more than 80 years are only a 



reflection of one of the main de- 
fects of modern Western civiliza- 
tion, the divorce of that civilization 
from divine truth, a divorce ob- 
tained in the name of "humanism," 
which has turned out to be most 
inhuman. . . . This deplorable ten- 
dency is far more magnified in 
Japan than in any Western country 
because the traditional morality 
was destroyed without being re- 
placed by even a semblance of 
Christianity. 

"The defeat of Japan in the Paci- 
fic War established in Japan a new 
political, educational and economic 
system, based on the principles of 
democracy and peace, eliminating 
all totalitarian and ultra-national- 
istic elements. . . . 

"Thus Christian missionaries for 
the first time in the history of Ja- 
pan have a full opportunity to 
preach the Gospel without any legal 
or social restrictions. The future of 
Christianity in Japan, then, seems 
to be most promising. 

"This guarantee of freedom of 
faith and thought, however, opens 
the doors to all kinds of views of 
life including immoral and sub- 
versive tendencies. 

"All kinds and currencies of 
thought are advocated, each of 
them characterized by the color of 
enlightenment, a rationalistic, anti- 
religious way of thinking. 

"It is quite natural that under 
such conditions the theory of Com- 
munism is gaining popularity a- 



347 



mong educated Japanese. It hardly 
seems that there could be more 
favorable conditions for successful 
Communistic propaganda than 
these that exist in contemporary 
Japan. 

"To fight against the tendency to 
follow Communism we must first 
conquer the radicalism of the En- 
lightenment, the formalistic ethics 
and relativism of Kant, the sub- 
jectivism and individualism of the 
Protestants. These have more or 
less fertilized the soil of Japan for 
the dissemination of the Commun- 
ist doctrine. 

Thus concludes the witness of 



Supreme Court Justice Kotaro 
Tanaka in his article in World- 
Mission. Father Organtino in 1577 
wrote what can be the conclusion 
of this brief survey of the Japanese 
missions : "It must be understood 
that these people are in no sense 
barbarous. Excluding the advan- 
tage of religion, we ourselves in 
comparison with them are most 
barbarous. I learn something every- 
day from the Japanese and I amp 
sure that in the whole universe 
there is no people so well gifted 
by Nature." 

(Reprinted from Mission Sem- 
inar. ) 







348 



Obtainable piam 

"*7Ue PaUianid 



1 



1 ) Masses of the Passion (English) 

2) Mass of St. Gemma (Latin for large Missal) 

3) Office of St. Gemma (limited supply) 

4) "God's Own Method" by Fr. Aloysius, C.P. 

5) Additiones et Variationes in Officiis Propriis C.P. 

6) Catechism of the Principal Duties of a Passionist Religious 

7) Regulations of (he Passionist Novice 

8 ) Order to be observed by C.P. Choir at High-or Solemn Mass 

9) Passionist Bulletin (Nos. 19-28) bound 

10) "THE PASSIONIST" 1948, 1949, bound 

11) Mary's Cavalier (St. Gabriel) by Fr. Osmund, C.P. 

12) "A Retreat Souvenir" by Fr. Victor, C.P. 

13) Voice and Speech Routine by Fr. Conleth, C.P. 

14) First Catholic Mission to the Australian Aborigines, by Fr. 

Osmund, C.P. 

15) Hymn to St. Mary Goretti. 

16) "Selected Letters of Recent Passionist Generals" edited by 

Rev. Fr. Matthew, C.P. 



~:- 






/S\ i\n r 



y w 






LLFTIN OF HOLY C 



SP 










5^ - c American Centenaty - LQ5- 




THE PASSIONIST is pub- 
lished quarterly at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, 1924 Newburg 
Road, Louisville 5, Kentucky, 
U.S.A. Issued each March, 
June, September, and Decem- 
ber. Financed by free-will of- 
ferings of its readers. There 
is no Copyright. The paper is 
a private publication "pro 
manuscripto." 

THE PASSIONIST aims at a 
deeper knowledge and closer 
attainment of the purpose of 
our Congregation. Coopera- 
tion is invited. Contributions 
by any member of the Con- 
gregation are welcome; whe- 
ther it be news, past or pres- 
ent, of general or provincial 
interest, articles dogmatic, as- 
cetic, canonical or historical. 
Photographs of recent or his- 
toric events in the Congrega- 
tion are also helpful towards 
the ideal THE PASSIONIST 
strives to reach and are 
sought. Contributions of our 
Missionaries to the Mission- 
ary Forum are invited. 



THE PASSIONIST 

Bulletin of Holy Cross Province 



IN THIS ISSUE 

Convocation of General Chapter 3 

Old Kentucky Home 7 

Fr. James Lambert (Obituary) 19 

Passion Notes 1951 32 

Out of Print ,.. 37 

Ius Particulare 42 

Our Customs 47 

Passionist News 53 

Provinces Abroad 64 

Bulletin Board 75 

Who's Who, Where 77 

Eastern Province 79 

Works of Ministry 83 



The Province of The Holy Cross 
Undertakes A New Mission in Japan 

1952, the Centenary of the Passionist Fathers in the United 
States, will mark one of the greatest steps undertaken by the 
Congregation in America. The projected foundation in Japan 
will be inaugurated this year. 

Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick, C.P., Provincial of the Pro- 
vince of the Holy Cross, has announced that the Curia has 
acquired property for the new foundation in the Diocese of 
Osaka, Japan. The new property consists of 2 1/2 acres of 
land, situated in a residential section of Hibarigaoka, a sub- 
urb of Osaka. The Passionists will make a regular founda- 
tion in the Diocese, as an exempt religious order. The work 
will not differ greatly from our work elsewhere throughout 
the world. 

Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick has indicated that the mem- 
bers of the pioneer group for the Japanese Mission will be 
chosen after the General Chapter to be held in May. The 
foundation will be undertaken in late Summer or early Fall. 
The first group will consist of at least four or five Fathers. 

The Diocese of Osaka, in which the new foundation is to 
be made, presents a great field of labour. Of a total popula- 
tion of 8,568,000, there are but a meager 10,110 Catholics. The 
Diocese officially embraces some 16,933.56 square kilometers. 

Before the War in the Pacific, as a rule, one religious order 
had charge of the missionary work in each of the fifteen dio- 
ceses of Japan. Thus, in the Diocese of Osaka, it was the 
Paris Foreign Mission Society. With the outbreak of war, 
foreign missionaries from enemy countries were repatriated 
of interned and mission work was almost arrested. 



After the war many of these returned and resumed their 
missionary work at the scene of their former labours. Post- 
war mission work is marked by the entry of many different 
foreign groups into the same mission territory. This was 
made possible through the arrival of many new groups in 
the Mission field. 

The Diocese of Osaka, ruled by the Most Rev. Paul Yoshi- 
goro Taguchi, now numbers some eight religious orders of 
men. The Parish Foreign Mission Society works in the Kobe 
sector chiefly. The Immaculate Heart of Mary Mission So- 
ciety (Scheut Fathers) have been in the Mimeji section of 
Hyogo Prefecture since 1948. The Canadian Redemptorists 
of the Toronto Province came to the Maizuru sector of Kyoto 
civil Prefecture since 194. The Oblates of Mary Immaculate 
came to the Itami sector of Hyogo Pref ectoure in 1949. The 
Mission Society of St. Francis Xavier settled in Kishiwada, 
Osaka Prefecture in 1949. Besides, the Jesuits have a parish 
in Kobe, the Conventual Franciscans in Nishinomiya and 
the Salesians in Osaka. 

These general statistics, taken from the Catholic Directory 
of Japan, 1951, show that there is a strong missionary move- 
ment in Japan. In proportion to the population, however, 
there are very few Catholics in Japan. Japan's total popula- 
tion, given as 83,196,000, numbers only 142,460 Catholics. It can 
be said, nevertheless, that the Japanese Catholics are of high 
calibre. This is evident, for instance, in the great number of 
vocations to orders of religious women in Japan, where, of a 
total of 2206 Sisters in the country, practically a third, 1874, 
are Japanese. The same proportion is maintained among 
vocations to the Brotherhoods, there being 169 Japanese 
Brothers out of a total of 271 in the country. Likewise, Jap- 
anes priests outnumber other nationalities. There are 195 Jap- 
anese clergy, as of May, 1951, compared to 133 German Fa- 
thers and 119 French. Americans, with 74, are fifth in number, 
being edged by the Canadians who have 79 priests in the 
Land of the Rising Sun. 



HE XXXVI GENERAL CHAPTER OF OUR 
CONGREGATION IS CONVOKED 



ALBERT OF THE SORROWFUL 
IRGIN SUPERIOR GENERAL OF 
THE CONGREGATION OF THE 
OST HOLY CROSS AND PASSION 
)F OUR LORD JESUS CHRIST. 

'0 ALL THE SUPERIORS AND 

MEMBERS: 
REETINGS AND PEACE IN 

THE LORD. 

HE sixth year now beginning, 
when though unworthy, we re- 
ived from God the office of gov- 
ning our entire Congregation, we 
ish, by this present letter, to con- 
oke the XXXVI General Chapter 
lecording to the Prescript of our 
biles. 

Let us, however, in the first place 
rive thanks to Almighty God for 
[he benefits which He has so munifi- 
cently conferred on our Congrega- 
ion in the past six years. For we 
vere able, with great joy of soul, 
o observe the Holy Year of 1950, 
ind to assist at solemn ceremonies 
vhich affected all the faithful of 
Christ with spiritual joy, but most 
)articularly so, the religious of the 
3 assion. We speak of the dogmatic 
lefinition of the Assumption of the 
Blessed Mother of God, the canoni- 
:ation of Blessed Vincent Mary 
Srambi, Bishop, of our Congrega- 

Most Rev. Fr. Albert, C.P. 



tion, and also of Blessed Mary 
Goretti, Virgin and Martyr, whose 
sacred body is kept most religiously 
in our church at Nettuno. 

Indeed, you all well know how 
greatly our Holy Founder vener- 
ated the Assumption of the Blessed 
Virgin Mary, and how he com- 
mended that veneration to his sons. 
Hence there is no doubt that he and 
all our members reigning with him 
in heaven, exulted with greatest 




joy at the infallible pronouncement 
made by the Supreme Pontiff. 

Moreover, the canonization of 
Blessed Vincent Mary Strambi, 
while it increases the honor of our 
Congregation, can be called a new 
canonization of the Holy Rule which 
we profess. For he reached the 
heights of holiness observing this 
Rule most faithfully until death, 
and defending it with great zeal, 
and inculcating it upon our mem- 
bers. This ought to be an example 
for both superiors and subjects, 
that we keep inviolate such holy 
and wise prescriptions given to us 
by God and approved by the Su- 
preme Authority of the Church. 

Nor can we pass over in silence 
the singular honor that has come 
to our Congregation from the 
speedy and solemn glorification of 
St. Mary Goretti, whom Divine 
Providence willed to commend to 
us, not only that we might promote 
the cause of her canonization, but 
especially that, by extolling her 
heroic example in our apostolic min- 
istry, we might stir up modern 
youth to preserve without spot the 
lily of chastity. 

We also give due thanks to God 
because of the new wing which we 
have been able to construct at this 
Retreat of Sts. John and Paul, 
which is intended for the General 
Curia and the University students. 
We also give due thanks to God 
especially for the restored facade 
of the Basilica, bell-tower and the 



adjacent part of the house — all thii| 
because of the munificence of th< 
Most Eminent Titular Cardinal! 
Francis Spellman, Archbishop o: 
New York, whom all our religious 
of the Passion will always rememj 
ber with grateful mind. For he haj| 
made our Basilica more illustrious] 
and worthy, wherein is kept th<( 
sacred body of Paul of the Cross 
and his room, too, in which he spem 
the last two years of his life ano 
died his most holy death. 

During these past years, peace 
having happily been restored bj 
God to the nations, our Congrega- 
tion has been able to exercise its 
apostolic activities with greal 
eagerness, and to begin new mis-! 
sions among infidels and non-Cath- 
olics, namely, in the island of Bor-i 
neo, in Bechuanaland, in Japan anc 
in Sweden. May we say, in pass- 
ing, that preparation of the mis- 
sionaries to labor fruitfully among 
infidels, according to the norms oi 
the Holy See, is most necessary^ 
and must be promoted with all zeal 
by the Provincials of the provinces 
which have these missions. 

These are the principal reasons 
for joy, on account of which we 
ought to thank the All-Good, Alii 
Great God. 

It is now fitting to inform oun 
members that the Apostolic see to- 
day investigates the lives of Reli- 
gious and their regular discipline 
with closer care and vigilance 
Hence the frequent investigations 



concerning the life and conduct of 
;his or that religious, concerning 
;he regular observance in this or 
;hat Province. All of this Superiors 
>ught to have in view, in order that 
;hey may better understand both 
;he account they have to render to 
jod and to the Church and the 
lonor of the Congregation, which 
iepends chiefly on them. For their 
legligence in examining the con- 
luct of their subjects, or in correct- 
ng and punishing their offenses 
:an have this or that Province, and 
jven for the entire Congregation. 
.n the International Congress on 
;he States of Perfection, convoked 
>y the authority of the Sacred Con- 
gregation ofReligious, held at Rome 
;owards the end of the Holy Year, 
L950, many questions were treated 
relative to the adaption of the reli- 
gious life to the needs of our day. 
Various reports and communica- 
;ions, written by selected religious 
Tien will soon be published by the 
same Sacred Congregation, and this 
will, without doubt, bring much 
ight to all. Likewise, in our coming 
Chapter, there will be no dearth 
)f problems to be discussed and 
settled, but it will be the duty of 
;he Capitular Fathers to seek settle- 
ments of those problems in con- 
formity with our spirit, and in con- 
formity with the rules of the Apos- 
olic See. 

The principal duty, however, of 
he General Chapter, is the election 
)f the General who is govern the 



entire Congregation, and of the 
other Higher Superiors who help 
him in so great an undertaking 
by their counsel and work. We say 
duty, but better, let us say with 
our Holy Founder, a great burden, 
"on which the good of all regular 
discipline depends." Wherefore, we 
ought to beseech our Lord with 
earnest prayer that He may en- 
lighten the Capitular Fathers, rule 
and inform them by His Spirit, 
so that, intent solely on what is 
for the Glory of God, they may 
both elect the best Superiors, and 
decree what is more fitting to pro- 
mote the welfare of our Congrega- 
tion. 

With the consent of our General 
Curia, and having obtained facul- 
ties from the Apostolic See, we 
have decided to anticipate our Chap- 
ter somewhat, with this end in 
view, that it be held in the spring- 
time, according to the custom of 
our elders. For the springtime is 
more opportune for those journey- 
ing to Rome and more favorable 
to those living in Rome. 

Therefore, by this present letter, 
we convoke the XXXVI General 
Chapter, to be opened at Rome in 
this Retreat of St. John and Paul, 
on the first day of May of the 
current year, and we summon to it 
all those who have the right of suf- 
frage in a General Chapter, accord- 
ing to our Rules and Constitutions. 
It is necessary that they be present 
here at latest on the evening of 



April 30th, so that they may attend 
all the sessions, both preliminary 
as well as formal. 

According to ancient custom, let 
each Provincial bring to the Chap- 
ter a declaration signed by himself, 
regarding the diligent -care of the 
archives and the celebration of 
Masses. And since at the time of 
the Chapter the Retreat of Sts. 
John and Paul will be burdened 
with no slight expense, we ask the 
same Provincials to contribute some 
support, according to paragraph 
248 of the Holy Rule. 

Accordingly, from the time of the 
receipt of this letter until April 
30th inclusively, in all the Retreats 
of our Congregation, let the follow- 
ing prayers be recited daily and 
in common, at the beginning of the 
evening prayer: The Veni Creator 
and the Litany of the Saints with 
the respective prayers. Then, one 
Pater, Ave, Gloria, with the re- 
spective antiphon, response and 
prayer in honor of the following 
patrons of our Congregation: 

St. Michael the Archangel, 

St. Joseph, 

St. Paul of the Cross, 

St. Vincent Mary Strambi, 

St. Gabriel of the Sorrowful 
Virgin. 



Let the solemn Triduum, accordi 
ing to the rule of our Ritual, hi 
held on May 1st, 2nd, and 3rd. 

Moreover, we earnestly exhor 
that all the members most earnestly 
commend to God the happy outcom» 
of the Chapter in their private 
prayers, and especially during Mass 
and the reception of Holy Coml 
munion. 

Finally, may it be permitted d 
to open our grateful soul to thi 
members of the General Curia foi 
their wise and powerful help bej 
stowed upon us in the governmenj 
of the entire Congregation, to thi 
Provincials, Superiors, and to at 
the members ? for their reverence 
obedience and love manifested fo 
us, and to beg pardon of all for anj 
of our failings. 

Meanwhile, commending our 
selves to the prayers of all, we im 
part our fatherly blessing. 

Given at Rome, from the Re 
treat of Sts. John and Paul, oi 
January 15, 1952. 

Albert of the Sorrowful Virgil 

Superior General, C.B 

Haycinth of the Most Holy Cruci 
fied, Secretary General, C.P. 




OLD KENTUCKY HOME 

exacted rfteant^l{efaeai 9 Jjouisville, f{eniuc^ 



By GODFREY POAGE. C.P. 




■■m 



■^^^■Mi 



II. The New Sacred Heart 



The cornerstone of the new 
Retreat was laid, by a happy 
coincidence, on the 25th Anniver- 
sary of the dedication of the old 
monastery. The ceremony took place 
on Sunday, July 16, 1905, the feast 
of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel. In the 
absence of the Bishop, the Apostolic 
Delegate instructed Very Rev. Fr. 
Provincial to lay the stone. 

Work on the new building prog- 
ressed very rapidly. The two archi- 
tects, Denis and James Murphy, 



were doing an excellent job. With- 
in five months they had the walls 
up and the roof ready for the slate. 
James had visited our monasteries 
in the East and noted their designs 
and purposes. His brother had gone 
over the Rule and the location. To- 
gether, they were able to produce 
one of the best and most homelike 
monasteries possessed by the Pas- 
sionists in America. 

July, 1906, saw the completion 
of the new Retreat. The dedication 



and formal opening of both the 
public Chapel, named in honor of 
St. Agnes, titular of the Parish, 
and the new monastery took place 
on Sunday, July 29th. The Pro- 
vincial and his two Consultors, to- 
gether with the Rectors of the yet 
undivided Province, were all pres- 
ent for the occasion. It was the last 
assemblage of East and West as 
one Province, for the next day ar- 
rived the Decree from Rome, an- 
nouncing the creation of Holy Cross 
Province. 

In the morning Bishop McCloskey 
blessed the Chapel, presided at the 
Solemn Mass and preached the ser- 
mon. He paid high tribute to the 
Order, and spoke of the great good 
the Passionists had accomplished. 
"It gives me great pleasure," he 

fiar 

!R' j/.- k Pat; 



said, "to see the work of the Order* 
receive a new impetus in the Dio-i 
cese of Louisville." 

At 3:30 in the afternoon of the 
same day, Very Rev. Fr. J. PJ 
Cronin, Vicar General of the Dio-< 
cese, blessed the Monastery. 
Throngs of local Baptists and curi- 
ous citizenry were on hand, for the 
papers had announced that the 
building would be thrown open 
afterwards for the inspection of alll 

DIVISION OF THE PROVINCE! 

The following morning, when all 
had been assembled in the nev 
Choir, the Provincial, Fr. Fidelis 
delivered a stirring discourse. HI 
then read the Bulls of election 
received from Rome, establishing 
in office the Higher Superiors 03 




m 



■ 



. 



Sacred Heart Retreat, showing the old St. Agnes Church, the addition at tl 
right front corner of the building. 



8 



the new Province of the Holy Cross. 
The new Provincial was Fr. Charles 
of Holy Mary, and his Consultors 
were Fr. Philip of the Assumption 
and Fr. Denis of the Virgin Mary. 

After the customary acts of obe- 
dience, the new Provincial and his 
Consultors withdrew to elect a Mas- 
ter of Novices for the new Prov- 
ince, a Rector for Sacred Heart Re- 
treat, and another for Our Lady 
of Good Counsel Retreat in St. 
Louis. The choice for Master fell 
upon Fr. Wilfrid. Fr. Henry was 
chosen Rector of the new Sacred 
Heart Retreat, while the St. Louis 
retreat fell to Fr. Alfred. 

On August 22, Fr. Wilfrid 
brought the "Western" novices 
from the Novitiate at Pittsburgh. 
There were eight clerics and two 
brothers. The regular observance 
was resumed on the Feast of St. 
Louis, Aug. 25. 

The first religious Profession in 
Holy Cross Province occurred on 
Rosary Sunday, October 7, 1906. 
One cleric, Confr. Luke of St. 
Patrick (Callahan), was professed, 
and three cleric postulants received 
the habit. 

A NEW BISHOP 

On September 17, 1909, as it 
must come to all men, death came 
to Bishop McCloskey. As the obitu- 
ary notice stated, he had ruled the 
Diocese for over forty years with 
a strong hand. He was "one of the 
Bishops of the old school, who could 
tolerate no levity or worldliness in 






his clergy. He was feared, but not 
loved." 

His placed was taken by the gen- 
tle and saintly Bishop Denis O'Don- 
oghue, formerly Auxilary of In- 
dianapolis. The new Bishop was 
very friendly toward the Passion- 
ists, and shortly afterwards offered 
us the six acres southeast of the 
Retreat. When asked the price, he 
replied: "What does that matter 
among friends?" The land was pur- 
chased at a nominal cost of $850, 
and the Bishop, to further secure 
us against intrusion, donated a 
strip of land on the North boundary 
near the new cemetery line. He 
also donated some 9 1/2 acres for 
a school. 

During his Visitation, in 1912, 
Most Rev. Fr. General and the 
Local Chapter, asked Bishop O'Don- 
oghue to change the name of the 
Parish from "St. Agnes" to that of 
"Sacred Heart." Thus both Re- 
treat and Parish would have one 
title and perennial misunderstand- 
ings in regard to Patronal Feast, 
proper prayers and the like would 
be avoided. His Excellency admitted 
the force of the arguments in favor 
of the change, but objected on the 
ground that there was already a 
Parish by the name of "Sacred 
Heart" in the city, and two with 
the same name would cause even 
greater misunderstandings. How- 
ever, with true episcopal gracious- 
ness, he promised to consider the 
matter . . . and so matter was closed. 

9 



ST. AGNES SCHOOL 

At the beginning of the new year, 
1913, Very Rev. Fr. Cletus, Rector 
and Pastor, was dickering with the 
local School Board for the purchase 
of their old District School No. 51. 
He had decided that St. Agnes could 
use the old country building that 
had been abandoned when a new 
school was put up. Finally, he man- 
aged to arrange a deal whereby 
St. Agnes was to receive the old 
building with all its furniture, in- 
cluding two stoves, a large bell and 



48 desks and seats, for a trifle 
over $100. The entire building was 
then moved a mile down the road 
to its new location north of the 
Monastery. Upon invitation, the 
Sisters of Charity of Nazareth sent 
two Sisters to take charge of the 
classes. 

St. Agnes School opened Jan. 5, 
1914. The building was not quite 
ready for the children, so the first | 
classes were held in the Grotto, 
fittingly arranged beneath the Mon- 
astery Chapel. The first day's en- 



'W9b [ 



aW, 




m 









il%- 



First St. Agnes School. This picture was taken the day the school open< 
The priest is Fr. Cletus, Rector and Pastor. 

10 



rollment was 27. Two days later 
it had increased to 32. At length, 
in the "new" school, the enrollment 
grew rapidly, numbering 50 by the 
time school let out for the summer 
vacation. 

MATERIAL IMPROVEMENTS 

The 1914 Provincial Chapter had 
recognized the need of more regular 
outdoor exercise for the monks. 
Sacred Heart Retreat was one of 
the first to effect a practical result. 
The Local Chapter was summoned, 
and it discussed with enthusiasm 
the construction of a swimming 
pool on the property behind the 
Retreat. Everything seemed more 
than favorable. Much of the ma- 
terial was at hand. The site pro- 
posed assured an economy of ex- 
penditure, both financial and physi- 
cal. Accordingly, in the Spring of 
1915, ground was broken and by 
June the pool was ready for the 
water. 

"The work," says the Chronicler, 
"proved a most successful invest- 
ment in several ways : firstly, the 
actual grading and building was a 
healthy exercise, and the beginning 
of a vigorous outdoor exercise that 
manifested itself at once in in- 
creased appetites among the nov- 
ices; secondly, it offered opportun- 
ities for swimming which is a most 
beneficial exercise in xe; and third- 
ly, it offered relief in the extremely 
hot weather." 

Later in the year, the decision 
was made to erect a new barn. The 



old place was in an extremely de- 
lapidated condition, and when it 
was pulled down the last of the 
buildings of the original foundation 
was destroyed. However, necessity 
could not yield to sentiment, and 
to say the least, no one in the 
Chapter wanted to keep a number 
of broken down horse stalls as the 
last remnant of our coming to 
Louisville! 

DARK DAYS 

The dark days of the World War 
came close to home in the early 
part of 1917. On June 5, Father 
Gabriel was called up by the Draft. 
At the same time Brothers Victor 
and Richard, and five cleric novices 
received their summons. The very 
morning of his draft call, Brother 
Richard had made his religious 
Profession, and thus became the 
first Passionist in America to take 
his Vows with the added clause 
"until the time when called to mili- 
tary service." 

"The dread war," forebodes the 
Chronicler, "is reaching into our 
peaceful cloisters and distributing 
the even tenor of our life. The 
future is dark, and no man knows 
what is in store for the Church 
and Religious Orders in this coun- 
try." 

Rev. Fr. Edwin, the Rector, had 
volunteered for service as a Chap- 
lain, and when he received his com- 
mission in the Army, he resigned 
the Superiorship of the Retreat. 



11 



He was succeeded by Rev. Fr. Al- 
phonsus. 

The Chaplain's Training School 
was at Camp Taylor, an extensive 
tract lying southwest of the Mon- 
astery, and bordering on our own 
property. In consequence, the 
priests stationed there frequently 
came over to the Monastery on 
Saturday evening and remained for 
their Masses on Sunday morning. 
Our simple monastic conveniences, 
they said, were "like the Waldorf 
Astoria" compared to the Camp. 

When the dread Spanish Influ- 
enza struck Louisville in the Fall 
of 1918, it descended on Camp Tay- 
lor like a whirlwind. The priests 
of the Community rushed over to 
minister to the afflicted and dying 
soldiers. 10,000 men came down 
with the epidemic at the same time. 
The hospital at the base could ac- 
commodate only 3,000. Consequent- 
ly, the barracks themselves were 
converted into hospitals and every 
doctor and nurse in the city was 
drafted to cope with the emergency. 

Nevertheless, the battle against 
the epidemic was a losing fight. 
Thereupon, Fr. Regis Barrett, Chief 
of Chaplains, secured permission 
from General Austin to call in the 
Sisters of Charity of Nazareth, 
the Lorrettines, Dominicans and 
Ursulines. Over 80 Sisters re- 
sponded immediately, and the 
nurses among the Sisters super- 
vised the work. Their first order 
was for fifty barrels of good Ken- 



tucky Bourbon, which the Quarter- 
masters dispatched with alacrity. 
The whiskey was then diluted with 
milk and given to the afflicted sol- 
diers to stimulate their heart ac- 
tion. Despite the milk, hardly a 
soldier suffered any ill-effects from 
the rustic medicine. 

The only ones to suffer from the 
whiskey were the city Baptist con- 
gregations. It had been a shock to 
learn the Commandant had prac- 
tically turned over the Camp to the 
Sisters. It was too much when the 
news leaked out that the Nuns were 
giving. the boys whiskey! "Rather 
let them die innocent," they cried, 
"than live as drunkards!" 

Nevertheless, newspaper articles 
were loud in their praise of the 
work done by the Sisters and by 
the Passionist Fathers. The self- 
sacrifice and devotion displayed by 
many of the Fathers during the 
disastrous seige won much good 
will throughout the City. 

DEPARTURE CEREMONY 

The band of young missionaries, 
about to depart for China, arrived I 
at Sacred Heart Retreat on June 
24, 1924. They were the Rev. Frs. 
Basil Bauer, Terence Connelly, 
Jeremiah McNamara, Rupert Lang- 
enbacher, Clement Seybold, Ernest i 
Cunningham, Godfrey Holbein (all 
of the Eastern Province), and Frs. 
Anthony Maloney, Gregory McEt- 
trick, Cyprian Frank and William: 
Westhoven of Holy Cross Province. 
With them were Very Rev. Fr.; 



12 



Stanislaus, Provincial of St. Paul 
of the Cross Province, and his secre- 
tary, Rev. Fr. Cornelius ; Very Rev. 
Fr. Eugene, the Western Provin- 
cial ; and Rev. Fr. Cuthbert O'Gara, 
future Bishop of Yuanling, who 
was going to China to become Secre- 
tary to the Apostolic Delegate. 

The departure ceremony was 
scheduled for the following Sun- 
day, June 29. Owing to lack of 
room in the Chapel, the ceremony 
took place on the front lawn. It 
had been well publicized, and an 
estimated 3000 people were present 
for the occasion. 

The Very Rev. George Schuh- 
man, Vicar General, preached the 
sermon, dwelling on the history of 
the early missionaries in Kentucky 
and the sacrifices they had to en- 
dure. He pointed out how a like 
spirit still animated the Church, 
and as proof appealed to the young 
missionaries on their way to China 
to win souls for Christ, undaunted 
in the face of hardships and priva- 
tion. The listeners afterwards re- 
marked that Dr. Schuhman outdid 
himself, and surpassed in eloquence 
all others who addressed the young 
priests. There were few dry eyes 
in the audience as he concluded. 

Before the presentation of cruci- 
fixes, Very Rev. Fr. Eugene ap- 
pealed to the young men to look 
always to Christ Crucified for help 
and courage in their future labors. 
He then bid them "in God's name" 
to go on their long journey to the 



Orient. Each Missionary then re- 
ceived his crucifix and was bid God- 
speed by the members of the Com- 
munity. The ceremony closed with 
Solemn Benediction. 

Afterwards, at the luncheon 
which the Bishop and about 30 
priests took part, His Excellency 
expressed his pleasure at being 
present at such a ceremony and 
thanked us for all the help given 
him in the work of the Diocese. 
Just a little over a year later, the 
sad news was received that Bishop 
Denis O'Donoghue was dead. It 
was Saturday, November 7, 1925. 
With his passing the Community 
lost one of its great benefactors 
and staunch friends. 

NEW ST. AGNES CHURCH 

After the Provincial Chapter, 
held at Sacred Heart Retreat in 
August, 1926, Very Rev. Fr. Je- 
rome, the Provincial, called upon 
Bishop O'Donoghue's successor, 
Bishop John A. Floersh. From this 
meeting there came a definite un- 
derstanding with regard to the 
building of a new St. Agnes Church. 
It was agreed that the Church 
would be built and owned by the 
Diocese, and the ground upon which 
it was to be built should be con- 
veyed to His Excellency at a figure 
to be determined by him. 

Bishop Floersh, on his part, a- 
greed to assume all financial re- 
sponsibility for the building and 
maintenance of the Church, and to 
bind himself and his successors by 



13 



proper documents to leave the care 
of St. Agnes Parish and the pro- 
posed Church in the hands of the 
Passionist Fathers as long as they 
should wish to have charge of it. 
The Church, it was further agreed, 
would always be at our complete 
command for all the services of our 
Holy Rule and for any of the usual 
devotions proper to us. 

The consequent wrecking of the 
old St. Agnes Chapel began March 
7, 1927. On the following day, the 
bodies of Frs. Daniel, James and 
Xavier, together with that of 
Brother Frederick, were exhumed 
and reburied in the new cemetery 
close to the site of the proposed 



Church. 

The blessing of the cornerstone 
took place on the Feast of St. Paul 
of the Cross, April 28, 1927. Bishop 
Theodore H. Reverman of Superior 
laid the stone, in the absence of 
Bishop Floersh. Over forty priests 
were present with some 2000 par- 
ishioners and friends throughout 
the city. 

CYCLONE 

At 7:20 on the morning of Janu- 
ary 19, 1928, while the Community 
was finishing the second half-hour 
of prayer, a baby cyclone struck 
the southeastern portion of Louis- 
ville. The Monastery and church 






The Blessing of the Cornerstone 



14 



Were directly in its path. In a mat- 
ter of twenty seconds the monastery 
lost the roof of the "Novices' 
porch," the chimney and seventeen 
windows. 

The religious in the Choir were 
understandably alarmed as they 
heard the rending crash as the 
porch roof a few feet away was 
lifted high in the air, flipped over, 
and thrown back again on the wall 
and the columns that supported it. 
A portion of the heavy galvanized 
cornice was blown over the house 
and church and deposited in the 
cemetery. Another great beam was 
hurled into the front lawn. The 



chimney was knocked down and the 
resulting crash of bricks had fallen 
through the roof. 

The Church, only one month 
from dedication, suffered less se- 
verely. The large trancept window 
over St. Gabriel's altar was shat- 
tered, as were six windows in the 
nave. However, save for a few 
broken tile on the campanile and 
roof, there was little other damage. 
The losses on both Monastery and 
Church were fully covered by in- 
surance and an adjustment was 
made before noon that day. 
DEDICATION OF ST. AGNES 
"A fitting temple for the living 




Interior view of St. Agnes Church, showing the beautiful altar and baldachin, 
with its mosaic of St. Agnes over the altar. Around the walls can be seen 
the "della Robbia's." 



15 



God and the faith that made it pos- 
sible," the new Church was de- 
scribed on the morning of its dedi- 
cation, Sunday, February 19, 1928. 
The speaker for the occasion was 
Very Rev. Fr. Linus Monahan of 
the Eastern Province. For his text 
he chose the words from the 3rd 
Chapter of the Book of Kings: "I 
have heard thy prayer and supplica- 
tion, which thou hast made before 
me. I have sanctified this house, 
which thou hast built to put my 
name there forever. And my eyes 
and my heart shall be here always." 
Promptly at 9:30 the procession 
of the clergy and Bishop started 
around the Church for the bless- 



ings. More than 1000 people were 
present to watch the service and I 
assist at the Solemn Pontifical 
Mass. As His Excellency, Bishop 
Floersh intoned the Credo, 18 of^ 
our Fathers entered the Sanctuary 
fully vested and proceeded to the 
side altars to offer Mass at the 
same time as the Bishop. 

After the service there was a 
continous stream of visitors come 
to view the Church, which is unique 
in many phases of ecclesiastical art. 
Rev. Fr. Aloysius Dowling, the Pas- 
tor, richly deserved the congratu- 
lations that fell to him that dayj 
for the magnificent high altar ofi 
Breccia marble, the Old World! 




Front view of St. Agnes Church, Louisville, Kentucky, showing the beautiful 
lines of the Church, together with the stately campanile. 

16 



nosaics, and the beautiful repro- 
luctions of Delia Robbia art. 

ORGAN AND BELLS 

The only things missing in the 
>eautiful new church were a fine 
)ipe organ for the spacious gallery 
ind a set of bells for the vacant 
ampanile. It was not until six 
■years later that they were supplied. 

Mr. J. B. Wathen, Jr., a prom- 
nent and wealthy distiller of Louis- 
ville, confided to Rev. Fr. Aloysius 
that he realized that it was God 
who had given him so generous a 
mare of this world's goods and he 
did not believe in hoarding his 
-noney for others to enjoy after his 
death. He would like very much to 
3uy an organ for the new Church 
and leave it as a perpetual memorial 
to his deceased relatives. Later, he 
also promised to donate three bells 
for the campanile of the Church, 
as another memento. A few days 
later, his personal check for 
$25,000.00 made both these prom- 
ises good. 

The plans for the organ were 
drawn up by Professor D'Avignon 
Morel of Detroit, in consultation 
with Frs. Anselm and Austin, along 
the lines suggested by Fr. Aloysius. 
When finally approved, the organ 
was built by George Kilgen and 
Sons of St. Louis, Missouri. 

When completed the organ con- 
tained 3,458 pipes (2,757 in the 
galery and 701 in the sanctuary 
oratory) with many special stops 



and extras, two three-manual con- 
soles arranged in such a way that 
either organ may be played from 
the other console. The dedication 
of the organ took place on Sunday 
morning, October 21, 1934. Rev. 
Fr. Austin preached the sermon 
for the occasion. That evening a 
special recital was given by Dr. 
Charles Courboin, the famous vir- 
tuoso from New York. 

In the meantime, three large bells 
were purchased for the campanile. 
They were installed before the 
solemn Mass on the feast of St. 
John Baptist, June 24, 1934. After 
the ceremony, Mrs. J. B. Wathen, 
wife of the donor, had the privilege 
of turning the switch to ring the 
bells for the first time. 

UP UNTIL NOW 

In January, 1936, the decision 
was made to transfer the Novitiate 
from Sacred Heart Retreat to St. 
Paul, Kansas. Instead, the Monas- 
tery was made the house for 3rd 
and 4th Theology Students, for the 
beautiful new church was well 
suited for Ordinations. 

The following January, 1937, 
brought the distastrous flood that 
submerged most of Louisville. The 
Monastery, being situated in the 
Highlands, was spared the havoc 
that engulfed the rest of the city. 
St. Agnes School was converted in- 
to a refugee station. The Monastery 
became the temporary home for the 
Xaverian Brothers, after St. Xavier 



17 



High School lay in eight feet of 
water. The Brothers remained for 
weeks as our guests and their stay 
cemented our long-standing friend- 
ship. 

Four months later, the Commun- 
ity celebrated the first Ordinations 
at Sacred Heart Retreat. Eight 
young men were ordained by Bish- 
op Floersh at the Cathedral of the 
Assumption. It was also a big day 
for the parish of St. Agnes, for two 
of its sons, Frs. Neil and Michael, 
were among the eight. The others 
in this class were Rev. Frs. James 
Patrick, Ludger, Gabriel Mary, 
Kenny, Conell and Denis Mary. 

As the years passed, our Old 
Kentucky Home noted other impor- 
tant events. There was the fire that 
broke out on the third floor in 1939. 
Quick action by the Students, de- 
clared the firemen, saved the build- 
ing from a major conflagration. 



There was the visit of the Passion- 
ist Nuns in October, 1946, as they 
made their way to their new foun- 
dation at St. Joseph's Convent, 
Owensboro, Kentucky. There was 
the year 1949, when the old St. 
Agnes School gave way to a very 
modern structure that is a real 
credit to the Parish. Over and a- 
bove these highlights, the Chron- 
icles have little to say of recent 
years. The only exception concerns! 
the death and burial of the wonder-i 
ful men who have lived here. The 
little cemetery, with its protecting 
statue of St. Paul of the Cross, is 
the last worldly home of many o 
the greatest men in Holy Cross 
Province. One cannot walk down 
the rows of headstones without 
great feeling of pride . . . and 
growing sense of love for this farm 
ous Monastery that they called theii 
"Old Kentucky Home." 



The New St. Agnes School 



ill!!;! ' ' ' 



fill 






[Si JEgllli' 



EV. FR. JAMES 
LAMBERT] OF THE 
OST BLESSED 
ACRAMENT 



FATHER JAMES (LAMBERT) of the 
Most Blessed Sacrament held 
i rather unique place in the Prov- 
ince of St. Paul of the Cross. He 
^as professed and ordained in the 
Western Province yet spent his 
jntire priestly life in the service 
)f the Eastern Province. This came 
ibout primarily when he volun- 
teered for the Chinese Missions 
which autbmatically made him a 
member of the Eastern Province 
for the duration of his missionary 
career. Then after his return from 
Dhina, the thoughtful consideration 
)f the Higher Superiors made it 
possible for him to be near his 
iging father in Paterson and so 
le remained in the Province. 

This unique status of Father 
lames seemed characteristic of a 
priest and religious who was an 
unusual individual. Even his death 
was in a way unique. Within the 
few months preceding his unfore- 
seen demise, three priests of the 
Province had died with startling 
suddenness. Yet each one died at 
home in the midst of the brethren 
and with a last blessing from the 
Superior. But Father James died 




Rev. Fr. James Lambert, C.P. 

away from home and the brethren, 
died suddenly on a public street 
en route to a Sunday assignment. 
And somehow it seems that it would 
be his way of dying, to go off quiet- 
ly and meet Christ alone. 

Father James was taken very 
much for granted while alive. He 
lived a very serene life, he seemed 
always so mild mannered, seen but 
not too often beard, quite ineffusive 
and possessed of a genius in divert- 
ing attention from himself. In 
fact he just seemed to glide un- 
obtrusively through life, wearing 



19 



extremely well a mantle of anonym- 
ity. But the veil he had drawn over 
himself while he lived was removed 
with his death and the greatness 
of Father James made manifest. 

His record in black and white 
is one thing but to turn the pages 
of his record in red and gold — the 
red of his life as a Passionist re- 
ligious and the gold of his priestly 
life — that is quite another. 

In black and white the record 
produces dates and events which 
evoke no great historical signifi- 
cance. Joseph Lambert was born 
in Paterson, New Jersey, on Feb- 
ruary 3, 1900. Of his early years 
little is known. After his gradu- 
ation form the Paterson Central 
High School he went to work in 
a very prosaic occupation. He be- 
came a mail carrier. 

However, the years of carrying 
the mail cost him the chance of 
entering the Province of St. Paul 
of the Cross when he felt himself 
being drawn to the Congregation. 
Young vocations were at a pre- 
mium in the early twenties. His 
age told against him and it could 
have delayed his acceptance indefi- 
nitely. Vocations in the West 
though were less numerous. There 
he applied, was accepted and en- 
tered the novitiate of the Province 
of the Holy Cross. He took the 
name of James of the Most Blessed 
Sacrament and was professed a 
Passionist on October 29, 1925. The 

20 



usual course of studies culminated 
with ordination to the priesthood 
in Chicago on December 20, 1931. 

Father James then volunteered 
for the China Missions. He arrived 
in China in the summer of 1933 
in the company of Father Ben- 
jamin Wirtz, Provincial of the East, 
who was on a canonical visitation i 
of the Hunan Missions. For eight 
years he faithfully served the mis- 
sions until the withdrawal of ai 
number of our missionaries in 1941 
returned him to the States. While < 
awaiting the end of the war and ai 
return to China he was stationed i 
in Jamaica where he proved him- 
self invaluable at handling num- 
berless local assignments. 1945 saw? 
him happily en route back to his* 
beloved foreign missions. His sec 
ond turn of duty in China ended 
in 1949 much to his deep regret 
Yet his true spirit of obedience 
made him accept the orders to leave 
China when the effectiveness of the 
missionaries was being deplorably 
curtailed due to the occupation of 
the country of Communists. 

He became a member of St. Mi- 
chael's Community, Union City, and 
there lived an exemplary Passionist 
life together with a busy round of 
priestly duties in outside parishes 
and institutions. December 1, 1951, 
he set out for Lyndhurst, New 
Jersey, on a regular Sunday call. 
He never reached Sacred Heart 
Parish in that town. The Rector 
of St. Michael's, Father Cornelius 



McArdle, received the bewildering 
news by phone. Father James had 
collapsed on the street while walk- 
ing from the train to the rectory 
in Lyndhurst and had died before 
medical assistance could reach him. 
Death came to him in his fifty- 
first year, the twenty-sixth of his 
religious life and but a few days 
short of twenty full years in the 
Holy Priesthood. 

So ends his record in black and 
white. Now let us see the religious 
and the priest that he was. It is 
difficult to cast about and settle 
on one outstanding quality in Fa- 
ther James' holiness of life. There 
seemed to be no remarkably par- 
ticularized devotion that would 
characterize him. Rather he of- 
fered a perfect blend of religious 
and sacerdotal holiness a calm se- 
rene combination of virtues that 
needed no spurts of sudden fervor. 
He possessed the finest of all vir- 
tues and that in an unusual degree, 
the virtue of 'meekness.' 

The English language today has 
vitiated the word 'meek' and the 
term 'meekness' to a stage where 
they have become synonomous with 
'weakness,' a type of wishy-washy 
docility, an anemia of spirit. But 
the controlled strength of 'meek- 
ness' is the fruit of spiritual hero- 
ism, the unassailable summit of 
true holiness. 'Blessed are the meek 
for they shall possess the earth' 
said Our Divine Lord and certainly 
the 'weak' can never inherit the 



earth which crushes into oblivion 
cowardice of spirit. 'Jesus meek 
and humble of heart make our 
hearts like unto Thine' sings Holy 
Mother Church and the heart of 
Christ possessed the strength of 
a divine vigor. 

Father James had won this 
'strength of God.' His heart was 
humble and meek like the heart of 
Christ and possessed of a spiritual 
vigor. He wasn't born meek and 
humble. His will was quite a deter- 
mined faculty all the days of his life 
but meekness had given it beautiful 
control. Nor was he unlike anyone 
else born into the world, alien to 
feelings and emotions. But he had 
set himself to make his life as 
Christlike as possible and the per- 
fect meekness of his life was such 
that as with Christ 'virtue went 
out' when he came in contact with 
others and into the souls of men. 

He had trained himself in the 
great school of meekness, the school 
of the Passion. Likewise he drank 
deeply of the mystical cup of true 
meekness in his hours before the 
Holy Eucharist. How he realized 
the wonderful strength that ema- 
nated from the meekness of Christ 
in the quietude of the tabernacle, 
the strength that makes men saints. 

A religious and a priest of the 
caliber of Father James who has 
found the secret of the strength 
of meekness alone can fully appre- 
ciate what Our Lord meant when 
He cryptically said, 'The Kingdom 



21 



of Heaven suffers violence and the 
violent bear it away.' The self- 
possession of the meek is bought 
with a great price. The serenity of 
life in the meek is assured only to 
those who have overcome all things 
for the love of God. The beauty 
of humility in the meek is the 
fruit of their true appreciation of 
their nothingness before God. The 
sweet charity of the meek is the 
glorious flower of love in the happy 
spending of themselves for the 
glory of God. 

So the greatness of Father James 
is summed up in his extraordinary 
meekness. This is what endeared 
him to all; this is what gave him 
such power over souls. It gave a 
debonair serenity to life; it made 
him extremely humble in his own 
mind but likewise made all his 
brethren proud of him ; it enriched 
his entertaining gift of quiet humor 
and gave a glow to his charity; it 
made him delight in obeying, docile 
in everything; it made him in- 
genious in preserving his solidity 
of virtue and disarming in the man- 
ner in which he permitted nothing 
to affect his rigid self-discipline. 

Father James never preached a 
mission nor a formal retreat. He 
possessed none of the oratorical 
gifts which have distinguished so 
many Passionist preachers. He was 
a diffident and self-conscious speak- 
er even in ordinary conversation. 
Yet the times he did appear in the 
pulpit, his simplicity and priestly 



unction reached souls which golden i 
oratory could never penetrate. 

God just did not destine him toi 
be a public preacher because thei 
good Lord had prepared for Father 
James a special pulpit from which 
he was to preach and that, not once* 
in a while or at scheduled times buti 
always. That pulpit was one from 
which he was to preach the most I 
profitable of all sermons, the ex^ 
ample of an eloquently holy life. 

He preached this perpetual ser- 
mon in China where he spent more 
than half of his priestly life. Hei 
preached it in his contact with; 
clergy and people of the numerous i 
parishes in which he worked. He I 
preached it in the confessional, in: 
the parlor, in the homes of relatives i 
and friends, in all his dealings with 
his religious brethren and in thei 
changeless day to day observance of: 
the Passionist life. 

His first great love was, of; 
course, the foreign missions. Hei 
gladly would have given his life? 
for the cause of Christ in China; 
and he had fondly hoped that hei 
would end his days still in the 
harness of an active Chinese mis- 
sionary amid the hills of Hunan. 
Yet Father James found life in: 
China very trying. His first years j 
in the Orient were painful ones. He 
could not easily acclimate himself j 
to the ways of the Chinese, to the 
loneliness of the outlying missions 
and the hazardous modes of travel 
(Continued on page 91) 



22 



FR. MATTHEW 
I I.IIHIH | OF THE 
SACRED HEART, 
C.P. 



FOR the third time this year of 
1951 very sudden death visited 
the Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross. The name of Fr. Matthew 
of the Sacred Heart was added to 
those of Fr. Charles Gaskin and 
Fr. Henry Codyer on the lengthen- 
ing list of our priests whose pass- 
ing has been such a verification 
of the words of Holy Scripture : 
"Boast not for tomorrow, for thou 
knowest not what the day to come 
may bring forth." (Prov. 27, 1) 

St. John tells us in the Apoca- 
lypse: "And I heard a voice from 
heaven saying to me : Write : Bless- 
ed are the dead who die in the 
Lord. From henceforth now saith 
the Spirit, that they may rest from 
their labors; for their works fol- 
low them." (14; 13) With special 
emphasis may these words be used 
in the case of Fr. Matthew. 

Almighty God does not allow men 
to choose the time or the place or 
the circumstances of their death, 
be they saints or sinners. He has 
appointed that men must die, but 
die how and when and where He 




Rev. Fr. Matthew Kuebel, C.P. 



has determined. Yet if the good 
Lord had permitted Fr. Matthew 
to choose the manner of his pass- 
ing, more than likely not one de- 
tail would he have changed from 
those which actually did take place 
Friday Morning, November 2. 

In thinking of a priest's death- 
day normally we do not imagine 
that he said Holy Mass that morn- 
ing. We rather picture sickness, 
a patient in bed, physical weakness 
that would preclude going through 
the ceremony of the holy sacrifice. 



23 



However, in some instances of 
sudden death we subsequently 
learn that a priest did say Mass 
the morning of his death. But to 
very few priests, indeed, is the 
privilege given that Fr. Matthew 
received. He said Holy Mass three 
times the day he died. Ordinarily 
it could have happened only on 
two days out of the 365 in the 
year. But the good God permitted 
it to take place for a chosen soul. 
And more! 

The Father Superior of our Hos- 
pice of St. Vincent Strambi, River- 
dale, New York City was about to 
begin the first of his three Masses 
on All Souls Day when Fr. Mat- 
thew entered the chapel to make his 
preparation for Mass. He remem- 
bered that he had forgotten to place 
the list of his own dear dead on the 
altar. Hurriedly he wrote their 
names and put them next to the 
tabernacle. One Mass was heard. 
Another. Then a third. Fr. Matthew 
vested and said his three Masses. 
There followed fervent thanksgiv- 
ing. 

Little did Fr. Matthew think as 
he left the chapel to take his break- 
fast that the next time he would be 
in the personal presence of God 
would be at judgment just about an 
hour hence. His last Mass, however, 
had been said. His last three Mass- 
es. A little while later he was 
seated at the desk in his room. 
There was a sudden heart attack. 



A call to a brother priest for help. 
An anointing and final blessing. 
There were repeated ejaculations, 
"Jesus, Mary, and Joseph. Jesus 
have mercy on me." In ten minutes 
he was dead. 

Without doubt there are few Pas- 
sionists who do not envy with a 
holy envy the manner of Fr. Mat- 
thew's death and who do not wish 
and pray that in His gracious Prov- 
idence God would arrange similar- 
ly for themselves. 

We do not have to look very far 
to find reasons why the most holy 
God was so kind to Fr. Matthew in 
the happy circumstances of his 
passing — the three Masses heard, 
the three Masses said, the anoint- 
ing, the last blessing, two priests 
with him, prayer to the very end 
of an earthly life. Very few facts 
will suffice. 

In 1893 on August 23 a son was 
born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Kuebel 
in the city of Baltimore, Md. As 
a boy he attended St. Catherine's 
parochial school. On his graduation 
in 1908 he entered the Passionist 
Preparatory Seminary, St. Mary's 
Monastery, Dunkirk, N. Y. He was 
not quite fifteen years of age. On 
October 23, 1910 as Confrater Mat- 
thew of the Sacred Heart he pro- 
nounced his vows. On May 16, 1918 
at the end of the third year of the- 
ology he was ordained to the holy 
priesthood. In 1920 his active min- 
istry began. 



24 



There were eight years of teach- 
ing the Latin classics and English 
literature. From 1928 to 1933 Fa- 
ther Matthew volunteered for work 
in our Austrian-German Vice-Prov- 
ince, teaching Moral Theology and 
serving in the Preparatory School. 
On his return to the United States 
there were seven more years of 
lectorship, during which he taught 
Morals and Ascetical Theology. 
Since 1944 he has been the Prov- 
ince chronicler. 

« 

Fr. Matthew was just passed 58 
at the time of his death, yet he was 
43 years among the Passionists, 
41 years as a professed religious. 
Like Our Lord he was given 33 
years of priesthood. The mere sta- 
tistics of his life thus show prac- 
tically three quarters of it dedi- 
cated to God in religion. The quar- 
ter remaining the innocent years 
of youth during which the Almighty 
set the seal of His love upon him 
and drew him into the Congrega- 
tion of the Passion. 

Anyone who knew Fr. Matthew 
intimately would realize that no 
eulogy of his life could be written 
with his consent. His life was a 
hidden life and he was perfectly 
contented that it should be so. Yet 
an all-wise God made the end of 
his life as dramatic a climax as any 
publicity seeker might desire. In- 
deed, it was a spiritual climax, none 
the less a glorification in death that 
a retired life gave no indication 



ever would occur. The manner of 
his summons to the great hereafter 
gives striking testimony of just 
what God thought of lifetime gen- 
erosity in divine service. 

Fr. Matthew was a character 
blessed with a most determined 
will. This trait was manifest in 
his student days and continued to 
the end of his priesthood. Yet any 
superior under whom he lived could 
pronounce him a docile and obedient 
subject. 

Like many another of like dis- 
position he had his frequent battles 
with the virtue of patience. But a 
spirit trained in the school of self- 
discipline with a practical as well 
as a theoretical knowledge of the 
principles of asceticism was able 
to mark up a comforting margin of 
victories. Besides Father Matthew 
did have a good sense of humor. 
He was able to laugh at his own 
foibles. 

Any religious who daily keeps 
his rule, not merely in its major 
exactions, but in minor points of 
almost hourly monastic observance 
can well gauge the spiritual depth 
of Fr. Matthew's soul. A rule of 
life meant to him just what the 
words signify, a daily program of 
sanctification, useless unless fol- 
lowed with fidelity. Daily fidelity. 
Hence if a summation of his life 
were attempted in a sentence, just 
one simple declarative sentence 
would be needed. The sentence 



25 



would be this: Fr. Matthew kept 
his holy rule. 

Many of Fr. Matthew's brethren 
in our Province contemporary in 
age and even much younger, have 
had a more active life in the sacred 
ministry than he had. They have 
given many more missions, 
preached more retreats, heard more 
confessions, taught more classes of 
students. But he realized that the 
same principles of authority and 
obedience that fashioned the lives 
of others in certain channels of 
work, likewise dlirected his life 
and his assignments. It takes a 
soul of courage, of heroic mold, to 
be content in doing simply what he 
is told to do. He had that kind of 
courage and determination. 

Our Blessed Lord said of His 
own life : "I came down from heav- 
en, not to do my own will, but to 
do the will of him that sent me." 
If Passionist custom sanctioned the 
placing of an epitaph on our tomb- 
stones, the words Jesus used to 
characterize His own life, could 
well be chiseled on.Fr. Matthew's — 
I came to do the will of him that 
sent me. In this spirit was his 
essential greatness. 

During the seven year period 
that Fr. Matthew was stationed in 
Riverdale as Province historian, he 
served as Chaplain to the nearby 
convent of cloistered Visitation Sis- 
ters. On learning of his death the 
Mother Superior wrote this letter 

26 



to our Father Superior at St. Vin- 
cent Strambi Hospice: 

Monastery of the Visitation 
November 3, 1951 

V. Rev. Benedict Huck, C.P., 
Dear Reverend Father : 

There are times when one does 
not know how to express the feel- 
ings of the heart, and this is cer- 
tainly one of those occasions. 

The sudden death of our beloved 
and devoted Fr. Matthew has been 
an almost indescribable shock tea 
our Community. It has moved us i 
as profoundly as if it had been 
one of ourselves. We experienced 
a sad comfort when our dear Sis- 
ter Sacristan tolled the bell in his 
memory. 

We can appreciate the loss Fa- 
ther will be to you and his holy 
Order, having seen the fidelity with i 
which he fulfilled his office of our 
Chaplain for almost seven years. 
He was an exemplary priest and we 
feel the beautiful circumstances of 
his death were nothing more than i 
Heaven's testimony of this fact. 

You, no doubt, are aware of that, 
which through the years impressed 
itself more and more upon us — 
Father's intense love for Our Bless- 
ed Mother. He never failed to speak 
of her with an extraordinary elo- 
quence and unction. We are con- 
fident that in his last hour she was 
to him everything he had hoped she 
would be. 

During these days we are think- 



ing of Father's family and prayB|November 5. He was buried in the 



the Sacred Heart will strengthen 
them to bear the cross of separa- 
tion. When the shock is over they 
will be able to find consolation in 
the holy and peaceful way Our Lord 
drew him to His Sacred Heart, for 
which we give thanks and beg for 
ourselves the same happiness. 

Extending to you, Reverend Fa- 
ther, and to your Community our 
heartfelt sympathy, we remain 

Sincerly yours in Our Lord, 
Mother Marie Agnes Anduze 
and the Sisters of the Visita- 
tion of Holy Mary. 

Fr. Matthew's funeral Mass was 
sung by V. Rev. Provincial in St. 
Joseph's Church, Baltimore, Md., 



Passionist plot of Cathedral Ceme- 
tery where he will fall away to that 
dust out of which he was fashioned 
by the creative finger of God. His 
last entry had been written into 
the Province chronicles. No class- 
room will be his any longer. No 
altar will witness his worship. No 
confessional will hear his whispered 
words of pauion. No community or 
parish will respond to his ministry. 
No monastic cell will know his holi- 
ness. He has gone into the house of 
his eternity. But how truly can it 
be said of Fr. Matthew of the 
Sacred Heart: "Blessed are the 
dead who die in the Lord . . . they 
rest from their labors . . . their 
works follow them." 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 

extends its sincerest congratulations to its Silver 

Jubilarians of 1952. 

Very Rev. Fr. Gilbert Kroger, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Nicholas Schneiders, C.P. 
Rex. Fr. Francis Flaherty, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Marion Durbala, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Philip Gibbons, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Egbert Nolan, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Hubert Bohne, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Martin Matthews, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Claude Nevin, C.P. 
Rev. Fr. Roland Maher, C.P. 

Ad Multos Annos! 



— i 
27 



MOTHER MARY HYACINTH OF 
THE SACRED HEART, C.P. 



ON SUNDAY evening, July twen- 
ty-second, Mother Mary Hya- 
cinth delivered into the hands of 
her Maker the rich incense she had 
won throughout seventy years of 
faithful trafficking with the talents 
He had given into her keeping. 
The memory we cherish of her 
forms an echo in time of that com- 
mendation which is hers in Eter- 
nity — "Well done, good and faith- 
ful servant, because thou hast been 
faithful over a few things, I will 
place thee over many things: enter 
thou into the joy of the Lord." 
(Matt. XXV, 23) 

One would almost think that when 
Mother Hyacinth received from her 
Creator the treasury of her being 
with its proper powers and talents 
— even as the Gospel parable tells 
us that each of the servants re- 
ceived from the rich Lord, "accord- 
ing to his proper ability" — she had 
received, too, something of God's 
own appreciation of its worth and 
its place in the scheme of things. 
With rare simplicity, she took her- 
self just as she was, just as His 
foreseeing Wisdom had formed her, 
and moved quietly and steadily 
through more than seventy years 
of time allotted her, towards that 
summit of perfection for which, 
from the beginning, He had des- 
tined her. Every aspect of her life, 



every side of her character, every 
phase of her spiritual ascent isl 
graced with this simple content- 
ment in the attainment of God's 
own purpose, in His own way — 
teaching us all by her quiet exam- 
ple that the human, the normal, 
the every day with all in them that 
is God-given, are most sure step- 
ping-stones in our ascent towards 
union with God, for, true child of 
Wisdom that she was, having found 
Him in her own soul she did not let 
Him go; and in her simple faith, 
she found Him also everywhere and 
in everything around her. 

Her story makes interesting tell- 
ing, full of rich and varied ex- 
perience that wonderfully supple- 
mented her native self. She was 
born on October 23, 1880, to Bridget 
and Lawrence Madden both of 
whom died while she was yet a 
very young child. Like her broth- 
ers now deceased, and her two sis- 
ters, who have survived her, she 
was adopted into a good Catholic 
home, and raised as a true mem- 
ber of the family. Providentially, 
the young Agnes was adopted by 
Mr. and Mrs. Michael Donahoe of 
Dunmore, Scranton. The big-heart- 
ed Irish mother of this already 
numerous family proved such a per- 
fect complement and ideal for the 
latent tendencies and inclinations of 



28 



the youngster's own character, that 
blood relationship itself could hard- 
ly have improved upon the similar- 
ity between them which the years 
have revealed. The realities of our 
holy Faith, with their immediate 
and far-reaching consequences, 
seemed so wedded to their natural 
make-up as to make it easy to sur- 
mise, that whatever the shades and 
shadows were, certainly crossed 
their path, the darkness of incre- 
dulity or scepticism was never one. 
Gifted with those qualities which 
enhance the Irish at their best — the 
all-embracing charity, the ever 
ready sense of humor, the child- 
like candor, the brisk distaste for 
the trivial or superfluous, these two 
retained an eminently practical 
turn of mind. 

How Mother Hyacinth would 
laugh at our attempt at analysis — 
so foreign to her was anything like 
excessive self-analysis ; yet she had 
great self-knowledge and was aware 
of her own personal limitations. It 
would be an untrue picture of Moth- 
er to pass over, for instance, her 
excessive timidity. Her earnest 
struggles to overcome herself in 
this regard scored many a victory 
known to God alone and perceived 
by us only when we considered her 
life as a whole. Even in her later 
years as Mother Vicar she could 
never bring herself to address the 
Community in public, and invari- 
ably shrank from embracing any 
office or responsibility which would 



bring her to the foreground. She 
always seemed to manage to take 
the most unobstrusive place a- 
mongst us. Indeed, so simple, so 
very human was she it seems we 
might very fittingly appeal to Na- 
ture to describe her — point to the 
beauty of the daisy or the dande- 
lion ; to the patience of winter 
pears ripening under an Autumn 
sun; but most fittingly of all, to 
those words of Christ — "The light 
of thy body is thy eye. If thy eye 
be single, thy whole body shall be 
lightsome." (Matt. VI, 22) 

Agnes Madden emerged from the 
congenial environment of her child- 
hood possessed of a sound, prac- 
tical education which embraced the 
various phases of everyday living — 
as she herself admitted, she could 
run a sewing machince before she 
could read and write. Her love 
for children, indeed we might say, 
her kinship with childhood, induced 
her to add to her natural and ac- 
quired capabilities a period of train- 
ing in Father Baker's Orphanage 
in Buffalo — how precious to her 
were her memories of this vener- 
able priest and those months spent 
near the shrine of Our Lady of 
Victory. Thereafter, as we gather 
from the stories and incidents 
Mother Hyacinth delighted to re- 
late, she seems to have spent her 
more mature years back and forth 
between the Donahoe home in 
Scranton and her sister's growing 
family in New York — taking vari- 



29 



ous positions, too, in private homes 
as a practical nurse for children. 
One would think that this sort 
of life might well have satisfied her 
— surrounded as she was by those 
she loved and to whom she had en- 
deared herself; her generous, com- 
passionate nature finding ample op- 
portunity to spend itself in the 
service of others, and her innate 
piety at liberty to expand and deep- 
en in a truly Catholic environment. 
Yet, there was another side of Ag- 
nes' character — the hidden well- 
spring of her whole personality, 
that reached out for a wider field 
of action, a greater freedom of 
spirit. 

To her our Blessed Lord's words 
had a vital meaning : "I have come 
to cast fire on the earth, and what 
will I but that it be enkindled." 
(Luke XII, 49) The whole world 
was hers, all mankind was hers, 
to be led to the Sacred Heart of 
Him Who had died on Calvary that 
all men might be saved and brought 
to the knowledge of truth. And she 
chose as the means of her aposto- 
late the hidden life of prayer, self- 
sacrifice, and immolation. 

The Passionist Nuns arrived in 
Scranton in the July of 1926. Agnes 
Madden was then forty-five years 
of age. The Nuns purchased the 
property immediately across the 
street from the Donahoe home in 
Dunmore, and began the arduous 
task of transforming the estate into 
a suitable convent. Hardly a year 



passed when this mature woman, 
with almost two-thirds of her life 
behind her, sought entrance into 
the infant Community as a simple 
Postulant. This most remarkable 
fact of her life is also the most 
revealing. How truly single was the 
eye of her soul which could look 
upon the apparent constraint of 
cloistered life, the binding force of 
the vows, the utter dependence on' 
religious obedience, and recognize 
in them the meaning of filling up 
whatever was wanting in the suf- 
ferings of Christ for His Mystical 
Body. Even more evident of her 
strong simplicity, certainly, is the 
fact of her perseverance, side by 
side with companions so much 
younger than herself, unto the very 
door of Profession — preserving the 
while a neat balance between the 
docility and dependence necessarily 
required of the Novice, and those 
qualities of sound judgment which 
were inherent in her very make-up. 

At her Vestition, on the day of 
the Dedication of the new Convent 
July 2, 1928, she was given the 
name Mary Hyacinth of the Sacred 
Heart. She was professed October 
3, 1929. The newly professed fitted 
with ease into that place amongst 
the Nuns which God had prepared 
for her, proving herself a provi- 
dential gold-mine of reliability to 
superiors and companions alike. 
The commonplace, the monotonies 
of the twenty-four years that fol- 
lowed would wash up over her and 



30 



almost hide her from view — a hid- 
denness she would relish — were it 
not that every heart she touched 
retains the mark of her quiet in- 
fluence. There is not one of us who 
knew her but treasures indelible 
memories of her boundless charity 
and her way of always making her- 
self useful. How often have we not 
seen her on her solitary walks in 
the garden, gathering up the twigs 
which had fallen during a previous 
storm and collecting them as fire- 
wood in a basket so that they might 
be ready for the Sisters in the 
kitchen. Her experience as a prac- 
tical nurse rendered her a capable 
infirmarian — in this office it became 
evident that hers was truly a ma- 
ternal heart that could forestall the 
needs of others. She was as cap- 
able, too, in the other offices en- 
trusted to her — but her glory was 
her skill with the sewing machine. 
She could manage one of these 
better than her own right hand. 
Yet wherever we find her, be it dur- 
ing those first years when she was 
able to be everywhere, or later when 
her years and the decline of her 
health began to set limits to her 
activity, this good Mother is always 
the same — strewing her path with 
little acts of kindnesses, here a 
gentle word of counsel, there an 
understanding smile, everywhere 
the epitome of common sense. What 
fun she was at recreation with her 
unfailing good humor. Even during 
her last illness when, due to ex- 



treme weakness, it was impossible 
for her to follow long conversation, 
she surprised us on being asked if 
she realized it was the Fourth of 
July, "Oh, and I forgot to hang out 
my flag" came the quick witty re- 
ply. And who can forget her ex- 
haustless fund of stories, ready for 
any occasion, with an invariable 
chuckle and moral tucked into their 
folds. She cloaked under an ex- 
terior of calm and queenly reserve 
a heart of almost poignant tender- 
ness. How often, she confided to 
her Superior, even long after Moth- 
er Agnes and her companions had 
left to establish the new monastery 
in Kentucky, did she not have to 
rise quickly and leave the recrea- 
tion lest the unbidden tears of lone- 
liness at the mention of their 
names, be noticeable to those a- 
round her. 

It is only through these things 
that we can guess at the hidden 
depths, the leashed power which 
pulsed in a truly motherly heart. 
It is only from the example of her 
daily life that we can form some 
conception of the inner spirit of 
prayer and mortification which ani- 
mated her. Only thus can we know 
that Mother Hyacinth's conception 
of her vocation as a Passionist was 
to embrace in union with Jesus 
Crucified the Will of her heavenly 
Father in whatever form it mani- 
fested itself to her. What there 
was of effort or struggle or trial 
{Continued on page 94) 



31 



A 



w 



A Review of the 1951 Periodicals 



Passion Notes, 1951 



DURING this year of our Ameri- 
can Centenary we will be most 
interested in matters pertaining to 
Passionists. At least it will be 
useful to begin our review of Pas- 
sion articles for 1951 with a refer- 
ence to those dealing with our own 
Congregation. 

Father Fidelis Rice, C.P., of the 
Eastern Province, presented an ex- 
cellent summary of "Passionist 
Spirituality" to the Review for Re- 
ligious (241-246). 1 This is a fine 
article, and might well be shown to 
the preachers for our Jubilee cele- 
brations, or to anyone else inter- 
ested in the life of the Passionist 
Fathers. The Sign ran two picture 
studies of our work in China and 
among the Negroes (Feb., p. 58-59; 
June, 15-17). 

Unfortunately we did not find 
anything on St. Paul of the Cross 
appearing in the periodicals of 
1951, but there was a brief note on 
St. Vincent Mary Strambi, in the 
Review for Religious (231-232). 
The American Ecclesiastical Re- 
view hailed Mabel Farnum's new 



life of St. Gabriel as "an excellent 
biography" (125, p. 399), and de- 
clared Fr. Alfred MacConastair's 
life of St. Mary Goretti to be "by 
far the best available life (1. c.) 
The Sign carried an article on 
Serenelli by Fr. Alfred in the Janu- 
ary number (23-25), entitled "Con- 
vit Number 3142." Serenelli, it 
will be remembered, was the mur- 
derer of St. Mary. 

Sermon Helps. . . . 

To turn now to material for Pas- 
sion sermons in general, we find 
again a good deal of material. In 
the Catholic School Journal (59- 
60) Sister M. Leonie showed how/ 
the Passion can be told to children! 
in an article "Christ's Passion and; 
His Little Ones: a Unit for the) 
First Grade." Fr. Simon Wood,! 
C.P. discussed "The Altar and i 
the Cross" in the Sign for Feb- 
ruary (p. 30), while Fr. Hilary 
Sweeney, C.P. wrote "A Word; 
for a Sword" (April, 66), and; 
"Judas the Nominal Catholic" 
(March, 59) for the same Passion- 



NOTE: AH refernces are to 1951 numbers of the various periodicals. If there are two < 
volumes for the one year, we give the volume number also. Where necessary we add) 
the month. Otherwise there is just the page references to the current year. 

32 



ist magazine. Judas was also the 
subject of an article in the Ligour- 
ian (421-425) by Fr. R. J. Miller, 
called "Too Poor for Judas Iscar- 
iot." Father Miller considers "the 
case for Judas ... a true mystery 
story." He holds that "the criminal 
Judas Iscariot was led to commit 
his deed of darkness because he 
had allowed himself to become dis- 
gusted with the poverty and lack 
of earthly promise in the life of 
Jesus Christ." Hence, the author 
concludes that "the avarice theory 
is insufficient." 

The sorrowful mysteries of the 
Rosary were applied to the priest- 
ly vocation in an article by Nicolas 
E. Walsh for the Homiletic and 
Pastoral Review (June, 51, 802- 
806) entitled "A Vocation to the 
Priesthood according to the Mys- 
teries of the Rosary." In the same 
magazine T. A. Fox offered the 
readers a sermon on the "Precious 
Blood" (51, 817-819). "Longinus, 
Soldier of the Passion" was the 
subject of an article in the Ave 
Maria (73, Mar. 17, 334-337) by 
B. Francis. 

We can conclude our Sermon 
Helps by referring to two small 
poems: "Then Only" by Sr. M. 
Adelaide, R.S.M. in the Sign 
(March, 44) and "Veronica Wipes 
Jesus' Face" by Fr. Gerard Rooney, 
C.P. also in the Sign (Feb. 52). 
"Then Only" treats of the tomb of 
Christ. Both may be found useful 
in sermon writing. 



The Theology of the Passion. . . . 

Several interesting theological ar- 
ticles appeared during the last year. 
"The Precious Blood, Doctrine and 
Devotion" by St. Mary Celine, R.A. 
P.B. in the Cross and Crown (130- 
150) proved an excellent presenta- 
tion. The author traced the doc- 
trine of the Precious Blood in the 
Old and New Testaments, writing 
especially of "its specific and singu- 
lar role in the divine economy of 
salvation." 

Father Prudentius De Letter, a 
Belgian Father of the Society of 
Jesus, wrote a long article on "Pa- 
gan Suffering" for the new maga- 
zine World Mission (2, 1951, 28- 
36). Father De Letter asks: "Is 
it possible to find in the teaching 
and the grace of Christ any mean- 
ing and use for the sufferings of 
our pagan brethren?" After show- 
ing that pagans in bad faith "kill 
the seed of reward alive in their 
pains," the writer adds: "yet an 
innate sense of justice tells us that 
the sufferings of pagans in good 
faith cannot be lost forever when 
God is almighty and just and merci- 
ful. There ought to be some secret 
and hidden way in which they are 
invisibly linked with Christ and 
draw from the source of all graces 
the transforming force Christian 
merit infuses into human suffer- 
ing." He concludes that Christ does 
have an influence upon their souls, 
for "Christ, God-Incarnate, by be- 



33 



ing one of us, exerts an objective, 
ontological, sanctifying action on 
the whole of the human nature . . . 
but only remotely." "This radical 
or potential sanctity" must be com- 
pleted "by further gifts of grace" 
to become "subjective holiness." 
Pagans in good faith are disposed 
to receive this "subjective holiness" 
by their very sufferings which may 
well become "a God-given help to 
bring about the free acts" necessary 
for "an implicit baptism of desire." 
This study is well done and is 
worthy of the attention of the theo- 
logian. We mention it in detail, 
for we feel that perhaps many of 
the Brethren do not have this new 
review at hand. 

Another profound study appeared 
in the A.E.R. (125, 1-6, 120-129, 
196-207) on the "Meaning of 
Mary's Compassion" by Thomas 
Mullaney, O.P. Father Mullaney 
compares Mary's Compassion with 
Christ's Passion, as studied by St. 
Thomas in the Pars Tertia. In fine, 
theological terminology, he dis- 
cusses Mary's part in human sal- 
vation by "way of merit, satisfac- 
tion, sacrifice and redemption." 
This is a real contribution to the 
vexing problem of Mary's place as 
Co-redemptrix (cf our Passion 
Notes of 1950 in the June number 
of The Passionist, p. 107). 

Shorter articles on theological 
questions can be mentioned briefly. 
Father Joseph Colleran, C.SS.R. 
spoke of the Redemptorists' devo- 



tion to the Passion as their "re- 
living the Redemption" in "Re- 
demptorist Spirituality" in the Re- 
view for Religious (175-184), while ! 
Father Alexander Wyse, O.F.M. 
pointed out the place of Christ in 
"Franciscan Spirituality" in the 
same periodical (127-140). Father 
Donovan, CM. answered the ques- 
tion of the relationship of Calvary 
to the first Mass in the H.P.R/ 
(51, 755-57). 

Scripturally. . . . 

Articles dealing with the exegesis 
of the Passion texts in the Bible 
were few this year. The Verbum 
Domini had a brief note on the 
thirty pieces of silver given to 
Judas, "Constituerunt ei triginti 
argenteos" by R. Follet, S.J. (29, 
98-100). The author shows from 
Sumerian cuneiform texts that any- 
thing priced at 30 shekels was of 
a contemptible nature, and hence 
the high priests showed their con- 
tempt for Jesus by offering thirty 
pieces of silver for Him. 

In the Irish Ecclesiastical Record 
(65, 323-342), John L. Cameron, 
M.D. wrote on "How Our Lord 
Died, A Surgeon Examines the Gos- 
pel Narratives." Dr. Cameron holds 
that the nails were in the wrists, 
not in the palms of the hands. He 
describes Our Lord's death as due 
to shock, a state of bodily collapse 
with disorder or derangement of 
the functions of the different or- 
gans." Bodily shock, the Doctor 



34 



adds, is "associated with acute dila- artcile entitled "Evolution of Cruci- 
tion of the stomach" and brings on fixes" in the Catholic Art Quarter- 
death rapidly. ly (14, p. 87-88). 



Moral Cases. 



Fr. Connell, C.SS.R. offered food 
for several moral cases in the A.E.R. 
He treated of the Friday absti- 
nence in answering the questions: 
Whale on Friday," and "Meat on 
Friday" (vol. 125, 220, 390-392). 
Both responses found notice in 
Catholic weeklies, and even some 
of the secular publications. 

From the rubrics. . . . 

Several rubrical matters were al- 
so discussed during the year. Thus 
there was the question of the ar- 
rangement of the Stations of the 
Cross in the A.E.R. (125, 386), 
while Fr. Connell took up the ques- 
tion of a priest celebrating Mass 
on Good Friday in order to give 
Viaticum to a dying man. In this 
case, he would say the votive Mass 
of the Passion (A. E. R., 125, 391). 
In an earlier number of the same 
Review we were told a priest may 
omit the Passion at one of two 
Masses on Palm Sunday, with the 
permission of the Bishop (124, 
389). 

Several writers were interested 
in the altar crucifix. E. J. Mahoney 
wrote of "The Form of the Altar 
Crucifix" in the Clergy Review (36, 
p. 38-39), while D. Pruden dis- 
cussed cast-silver crucifixes in an 



Here and there. . . . 

The present condition of De Vin- 
ci's masterpiece on the Last Supper 
was described in The Catholic Di- 
gest (July, 31- 35), "The Last Sup- 
per Lives On," a reprint from the 
April number of Coronet. Father 
Hilary Sweeney, C.P. brought out 
the moral implications of a graffito 
of 200 A.D. called "The Palace 
Crucifix" (The Sign, Jan. 45-46). 

We might well conclude with a 
few words on the controversy oc- 
casioned by Hilda Graef's book on 
Therese Neumann. Father Norris 
Clarke, S.J. came to the defense 
of Miss Graef in The Priest (423- 
429). Father Aloysius McDonough, 
C.P. told the readers of The Sign 
(August, 15) to avoid "headlong 
enthusiasm" in this question. Miss 
Graef herself wrote an account of 
her visit to Konnersreuth and to 
Therese in the Josephinum Review 
for August 1, an account which 
should have appeared in her book. 

Several reviewers of the book 
(unfortunately, we did not note 
all of them) found her book ob- 
jectional. In the Irish Ec. Rec. (76, 
92-93) T. C. spoke of her "tone" 
as "distinctly hostile," her work as 
not a "critical examination" but 
"an attack on Konnersreuth," and 
concluded that it is to be "regretted 
that it was found necessary to cen- 



35 



sure the moral character of Therese 
Neumann." Carol Jackson wrote 
for Integrity (July, 42-46). She 
thinks that Miss Graef is "preju- 
diced," the book is "essentially in- 
complete," and also "biased, al- 
though unintentionally." 



And so the controversy goes on. 
In the latest number of the Priest 
(Jan., 1952) Miss Graef has her- 
self attempted to answer her critics, 
but that would take us to the Pas- 
sion Notes of 1952, and we have 
a whole year to prepare for that! 



RED, WHITE AND BLUE 

The blue of His veins flowed to red 
Pale white was Christ's body bled 
Defiled was God's body in death 
Agony the soul of his breath. 

The blue of His veins flowed to red 
Empurpling the death of God's bed. 
Thrilling His heart of desire 
God is Love in death-fire. 

The blue of His veins flowed to red 
When Justice and Mercy were wed. 
Again God married men 
Not lost beyond love in ken. 

The blue of His veins flowed to red 
And when all is done and said, 
God so loved his image fair 
God bled for it in care. 

Fr. Austin, C.P. 



Illlllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllllll 

OUT OF PRINT 



Items of interest clipped from the Press 99 
■iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii iti iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii 



EX-CINCINNATI PRIEST ASSISTS 
CARDINAL IN KOREA 

CAPT. KENNY E. Lynch, former 
Cincinnati priest who won two 
decorations while with the Army 
in Europe in World War II, as- 



sited Francis Cardinal Spellman in 
saying Christmas Mass in Korea. 
The Christmas Mass was wit- 
nessed by 3000 soldiers of the U. S. 
Seventh Division, five miles from 
front lines in Korea. Cardinal Spell- 




This picture of Fr. Kenny was taken North of the Hwachon Reservoir in 
Korea. The dark soldier at left is an Ethiopian. It took 2 1 - hours climbing to 
reach this position. The Chinese Reds hold the ridge next to this one. The 
Boys were happy to get to Mass. 

37 



man arrived by helicopter and went 
immediately to the snow-covered 
tent where the Mass was sung. 

Capt. Lynch and three other 
Army chaplains distributed Com- 
munion to the soldiers during the 
special Mass while UN artillery 
boomed nearby. 

During World War II, Captain 
Lynch won the Siver and Bronze 
stars for gallantry in action. He 
is the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. 
Peter Lynch, who lived at 2421 
May Street. 

Seven Lynch brothers served in 
the armed forces in World War II. 
One of them, Pvt. James A. Lynch, 
was killed in action on Okinawa 
in 1945. 

After World War II, Capt. Lynch 
returned to Cincinnati and was 
pastor of Immaculate Conception 
church on Mt. Adams. He re-en- 
tered the Army late in 1950, and 
was sent to Korea in July, 1951. 
He is a member of the Passionist 
Fathers community of the Holy 
Cross monastery on Mt. Adams. 

(Reprinted from The Cincinnati 
Post, Dec. 26, 1951) 



FR. LAMBERT DIES WALKING TO 

CHURCH; SPENT 12 YEARS AS 

CHINA MISSIONARY 

REV. JAMES LAMBERT, C.P., 51, 
of St. Michael's Monastery, 
Union City, veteran of 12 years 
service in the Passionist China mis- 
sions, was fatally stricken Dec. 1 
in Lyndhurst while walking to Sa- 



cred Heart Church to hear confes- 
sions. 

Solemn Requiem Mass was cele- 
brated by Very Rev. Ernest Welch, 
Passionist Provincial, St. Michael's 
Monastery, assisted by Very Rev. 
Neil Parsons, C.P., Acting Western 
Provincial, Immaculate Conception 
Monastery, Chicago, as deacon, and 
Rev. Leo Lanbert, St. Michael's 
Church, Passaic, nephew of de- 
ceased, as subdeacon. Rev. Kilian 
McGowan, C.P., director of stu- 
dents, St. Michael's Monastery, 
served as master of ceremonies. 
The Passionist seminarians sang 
the Requiem Mass. Rev. Bonaven- 
ture Griffiths, C.P., St. Vincent's] 
Monastery, Riverdale, N. Y., 
preached the eulogy. Burial was in 
St. Michael's Monastery Cemetery. 

Fr. Lambert, son of Patrick and 
the late Martha Campbell Lambert, 
was born Feb. 3, 1900 in Paterson. 
After graduating from Central 
High, Paterson, he worked for three 
years as a letter carrier. He was 
professed a Passionist in 1925 at 
Sacred Heart Monastery, Louisville, 
Ky. After making his studies for 
the priesthood in the Passionist 
Monasteries of St. Paul, Kansas 
and Chicago, he was ordained Dec. 
20, 1931, in the Chicago Cathedral 
by Cardinal Mundelein. 

In 1933 Father Lambert went 
to China and served in the Passion- 
ist Missions of West Hunan. After 
eight years he returned to the 
states and was stationed at Im- 



38 



maculate Conception Monastery, 
Jamaica, N. Y. In 1945 he went 
back to China again and remained 
for four years. Since his return 
to the States in 1949 he has been 
stationed at St. Michael's, Union 
City. 

Father Lambert was a zealous 
priest and an able penman. He 
wrote artciles on China that ap- 
peared in the Sign Magazine. His 
quiet but artistic soul could, on 
occasion, give birth to a religious 
poem or hit off an humorous car- 
toon. 

The deceased is survived by his 
father, Patrick and two brothers, 
William, an electrician, and Ray- 
mond, assistant secretary, Frank- 
lin Trust, all from Paterson. His 
one sister, Sister Martha Mary, a 
Dominican, is vice-principal of St. 
Mary's High School, Gloucester. 
Two of his cousins are religious, 
Father William Campbell, S.J. 
Marietta, Ohio, and Sister Mary 
Clair Lambert, St. Paul's School, 
Jersey City. 

(Reprinted from The New Jersey 
Catholic News, Dec. 8, 1951.) 



100 PRIESTS ATTEND MASS FOR 

FR. JAMES 

PALLBEARERS SERVED WITH 

HIM IN CHINA MISSIONS 

ONE of the largest funerals in 
the history of St. Michael's 
Monastery Church, Union City, was 
held at 10 o'clock, yesterday morn- 
ing, as services for Rev. James 



Lambert, C.P., of the Monastery, 
who died in Lyndhurst on Saturday 
while enroute to Sacred Heart 
Roman Catholic Church, there, to 
hear confessions, took place. 

More than 100 priests were in 
attendance and 150 sisters from 
the Orders of Dominicans, Fran- 
ciscans, Charity and Franciscan of 
the Sick Poor also paid last repects 
to Father James. 

The 6 pallbearers were priests 
who served with the deceased in 
the Foreign Missions in China, and 
with him were expelled by the pres- 
ent Communist regime there. There 
were delegations of Passionist 
priests from Jamaica, Scranton, 
Baltimore, Springfield, Mass., and 
Hartford, Conn. 

Visiting dignitaries of the church 
attending the funeral were Msgr. 
John J. Clark, pastor of St. Mat- 
hew's Church, Ridgefield ; Right 
Rev. Msgr. Daniel A. Coyle of Our 
Lady of Victory, of Jersey City, 
and assistant superintendent of the 
Diocesan Schools ; Very Rev. Thad- 
deus Purdon, C.P., of the Holy 
Family Monastery, West Hartford, 
Conn. ; Very Rev. Hubert Arliss, 
C.P., rector of St. Ann's Monastery, 
Scranton, Pa. ; Very Rev. Berch- 
mans Lanagan, C.P., of the Immac- 
ulate Conception Church, Jamaica, 
L. I.; Very Rev. Cornelius McAr- 
dle, rector of St. Michael's Monas- 
tery Church, Union City, and the 
Very Rev. Fr. Canisius Hazlett, 
C.P., provincial consultant of the 



39 



Passionist Fathers. 

Rev. Bonaventure Griffiths, C.P., 
of St. Vincent's Monastery, River- 
dale, N. Y., who preached the eulo- 
gy for Father James, called the 
deceased Passionist priest "truly a 
meek and humble man, as was his 
Blessed Master, Jesus Christ." Fa- 
ther Bonaventure pointed out that 
only a truly great priest would 
have drawn so large an attendance 
for the service, since custom and 
courtesy do not compel their pres- 
ence. 

The solemn requiem mass was 
celebrated by Very Rev. Ernest 
Welch, provincial. Following the 
mass the casket was carried 
through the monastery gardens, 
and laid to rest in the Monastery 
Cemetery. 



Father James was a native of 
Paterson, and was ordained in Chi- 
cago in 1931. He served on two 
occasions with Passionist missions 
in China, and left the last time at 
the request of the Red government 
there. 

(Reprinted from The Hudson 
Dispatch, Dec. 5, 1951) 



CARDINAL SPELLMAN RESTORES 
CHURCH 

THE WORK of restoration on the 
Church of Sts. John and Paul, 
Titular Church of Cardinal Spell- 
man of New York and of Pius XII 
before him, has been completed and 
makes the church and its surround- 
ings one of the major sights in this 
city. The church, on the Coelian 
Hill, was rededicated Jan. 17 with 




i 





Cardinal Spellman present. He was 
responsible for financing the work. 
Sts. John and Paul are two early 
Roman martyrs who were put to 
death under Julian the Apostate 
(361-3). They are mentioned in 
the Canon of the Mass. Byzantius, 
a Roman Senator, and Panmachius, 
his son and a friend of St. Jerome, 
fashioned their house into a Chris- 
tian Basilica in the second half of 
the fourth century. The two Roman 
martyrs are entombed here and the 
church soon became known under 
their title. Part of the original 
church, particularly the facade, was 
revealed in the restoration work. 
The structure was largely rebuilt 
in the 12th century. The work on 
the church and the adjoining mon- 
astery and campanile has made this 
corner of Rome a jewel of medieval 
beauty. The magnificent 12th cen- 
tury campanile, one of the finest, 
if not the finest, in Rome, has been 
restored to its original state. All 
trace of the deplorable "moderni- 
zation" carried out on the church 
in the 18th century has been ef- 
faced. 

All the rooms and later internal 
structure have been cleared away 
to reveal the interior lines of the 
building, with the exception of the 
cell in which St. Paul of the Cross, 
the founder of the Passionist con- 
gregation, died in 1775. The church 
is the headquarters of the Passion- 
ists. 

The rare ceramics which decor- 



ated the walls and were in danger 
of decomposition have been col- 
lected in a small museum adjoining 
the monastery. The monastery, 
which stands between the campanile 
and the church, has been given the 
appearance it had between the 11th 
and 14th centuries, with its two, 
three, and four arcaded windows 
once more revealed. 

In the course of the work a 
magnificent first-century portico 
was uncovered consisting of eight 
arches, which once formed part of 
the substructure of the temple of 
Claudius, built by Agrippina, his 
wife, and rebuilt, after Nero had 
torn it down, under Vespasian. 

St. Paul of the Cross (1694-1775) 
was given the church for his order 
by Clement XIV, and his remains 
are entombed in a chapel erected 
in his honor. 

(Reprinted from The Denver 
Register, Feb. 3, 1952) 



FORMER CHINA MISSIONER 

APPOINTED CHRONICLER OF 

PASSIONIST PROVINCE 

THE Rev. Bonaventure Griffiths, 
China missionary, and one- 
time correspondent for Lumen- 
Fides news service, has been ap- 
pointed Provincial Chronicler for 
the Eastern U. S. Province of the 
Passionist Fathers. He will be sta- 
tioned at St. Vincent Strambi Mon- 
astery, Riverdale, Bronx, N. Y. 
Announcement of Father Bona- 
{Continuvd on page 97) 



41 



De Capacitate Acquirendi 



lus Particulate C.P. 




THE POSSESSION OF TEMPORAL GOODS 



TEMPORAL 321. What power has 
GOODS the Congregation, its 

Provinces or its 
Houses, to acquire and possess tem- 
poral possessions? Canon 531 de- 
clares that not only an Order, but 
its Provinces and its houses as well, 
are capable of acquiring and pos- 
sessing temporal goods, along with 
stable, fixed revenues, unless such 
power has been excluded or re- 
stricted by the Rules and Constitu- 
tions. This right is based on the 
nature of a moral person, which 
all these have been granted by the 
Church. 1 

Our Holy Founder, desiring to 
make Poverty the foundation and 
the standard of the Congregation 2 
— an essential element in its spirit 3 
— excluded the power of possession 
from the very beginning. In the 
very first rules (1741), he inserted 
this solemn protestation : "This 
least Congregation protests that it 
does not wish to possess anything 
whatsoever, but begs Holy Mother 
the Church to take possession of 
all even the alms which the charity 

42 



of benefactors shall have pro- 
vided." 4 

However, this protestation was' 
suppressed in the Latin rules of I 
1746, implicitly acknowledging the; 
power of possession. Our present? 
text of the Rules, conformable to: 
the Code, speaks explicitly of econ- 
omes, and expressly mentions the 
possessions of the Congregation, 
the Provinces and Retreats. 5 
LIMITS 322. This power of posses- 
sion held by our Congre- 
gation is limited in two ways by; 
the Rule: with regard to stable: 
revenues, and with regard to im- 
movable goods. 

1. Stable revenues: By revenues 
is understood the fruits that accrue! 
from any given thing. Stable rev- 
enue is opposed to revenue that is 
uncertain. The former come neces- 
sarily, as a right, as e.g., from 
capital lent at interest, from prop- 
erty, from a pious foundation, or 
by juridical obligation. The latter 
do not come as a right, neither 
are they certain ; rather, they come | 
by the pious will of the offerer, or 



by mendicancy.' 1 Founded revenues 
are those whose stability rests on 
a juridical title, or because they 
come from a fixed sum of money, 
or from the very law of foundation 
of a house. 7 

Neither the Congregation, its 
Provinces or its houses may possess 
certain and fixed revenues. This is 
evident from Chapter XIII of the 
Rules, n. 93, where it is expressly 
stated that it is never permitted, 
by virtue of our vow, to possess 
certain and fixed revenues, whether 
common or particular. Moreover, 
the Bull Supremi Apostolatus, Sect. 
9, declares (what is confirmed from 
daily experiences and the history 
of the Congregation) that we must 
live only on alms. 

Our Congregation, therefore, is 
numbered among the Religious Or- 
ders that are strictly mendicant, 
namely, those whose Rules forbid 
possessions and revenues, whose 
subsistence is supplied by the un- 
certain mendicancy of the public 
quest. 

In the Rules of 1769, Chapter 
XV, the prohibition against stable 
and fixed revenues is modified by 
the clause : "under whatever color 
or title, whether in the Church or 
in the sacristy." While these words 
are not found in later texts, the 
limitation is nevertheless implicit- 
ly contained. For the prohibition 
against such possession is a general 
one, and never allows an exception. 8 
Hence, Poverty as it exists in the 



Congregation appears in this part 
most strict, for even the Minors and 
the Capuchins can receive annual 
revenues and a fixed income for the 
expenses of the Divine worship. 
2. Immovable goods : Our Con- 
gregation, its Provinces and Houses 
are forbidden the acquisition and 
possession of immovable goods, ex- 
cept for our solitary houses and 
adjoining lands to serve for a gar- 
den 10 and also a meadow and a 
woods. 11 This disposition, while it 
has existed from the beginning, is 
found expressly for the first time 
in the Bull Supremi Apostolatus. 
It was inserted into the Rules in 
the year 1775 ; in the same Rules 
was added the limitation "for do- 
mestic use." Hence, the quantity 
of the land is to be commensurate 
with the needs of the religious 
family, and may not exceed the 
quantity permitted by custom. For 
we are not permitted to sell the 
produce of the garden. Moreover, 
it indicates that the land must be 
connected with the house, and must 
be used for a meadow, garden and 
woods, and not for other cultiva- 
tion. With regard to the Prepara- 
tory Schools, see n. 361. 

ALL THINGS 323 ' In what sense 
IN COMMON are "all things of 
each house common 
to all the rest?" 12 The II General 
Chapter, decree 4, declared that 
"for the preservation of holy pover- 
ty and charity," all the retreats are 
one, and all their possessions com- 



43 



mon, so that a Retreat that has an 
abundance of alms is bound to come 
to the aid of others. The power of 
distribution among the different 
houses belongs to the General or 
the Provincial. 

This decree was put into the 
Rules in 1769, before it was pre- 
sented to the Holy See for approba- 
tion. Nevertheless, the Commission 
of Cardinals, in its vote, warned 
that "a rule of this kind, according 
to the repeated resolutions of the 
Congregation of the Council (con- 
cerning which see Card. Petra, torn. 
IV, Comment, ad Constit. Bene- 
dict XII, et torn. V, ad Constit. 
Pauli II, sect. 2, n. 2), is to be 
circumscribed within certain limits, 
namely: "as long as the articles 
are not of such great value or the 
sum of money so large as, according 
to the Pontifical Constitutions, to 
require the Apostolic sanction." By 
vote of the Cardinals, the text of 
the Rule was changed to read as 
it does at present (n. 104). From 
this it is evident that each Re- 
treat is truly a subject of dominion, 
and the Major Superior cannot dis- 
pose of its goods, beyond given 
limits, without failing against jus- 
tice. 13 

FOUNDATIONS 324 - The accept- 
OF MASSES ance of a P iou s 

foundation, entail- 
ing a perpetual obligation of Mass- 
es, is forbidden. By a pious foun- 
dation is understood temporal goods 
handed over to any moral person 



in the Church, in any way, which i 
carry with them, in perpetuity on 
for a very long time, the burden of I 
celebrating a certain number of I 
Masses, or of undertaking certain 
works of piety or charity, from 
the annual revenue. 14 

We may not accept pious foun- 
dations with a perpetual obligation 
of Masses. The prohibition is ex- 
pressly contained in n. 107 of the 
Rules, and also in the Bull Supremi 
Apostolatus, Sect. 10. However, it I 
was already contained in the very 
first Italian Rules, and also in the 
Rules of 1746 and 1769, in almost 
the identical words. 

The Rescript of Gregory XVI, 
dated August 5, 1841, can be con- 
sidered a partial remission of the 
prohibition. This Rescript per- 
mitted our religious in Belgium to 
accept a legacy with a perpetual 
obligation of Masses in the incep- 
tion of the foundation only, that ; 
is, where the foundation of a new 
retreat is in question. By com- 
munication of privileges, this per- 
mission is considered to have been 
granted to the whole Congregation. 
However, it is reserved to the Gen- 
eral. 15 Fr. Aloysius of St. Francis 
warns that in accepting these obli- 
gations one must keep in mind the 
Constitution of Innocent XII "Nu- 
per a Congregatione," 16 whose pre- 
scriptions have been renewed by j 
the Code. 17 Nevertheless the penal- 
ty attached to the Innocentian Con- 
stitution is understood to have been I 



44 



abrogated. 18 

OTHER ^25. May we ac- 

FOUNDATIONS ce Pt P ious founda- 
tions with the per- 
petual obligation of performing 
some work of Divine worship, piety 
or charity? The Bull and the Rule 
speak only of a perpetual obligation 
of Masses. Nevertheless pious foun- 
dations that have attached to them 
the perpetual obligation of other 
works than Masses are also for- 
bidden to us. This is clear from 
the prohibition in the Rules against 
possessing any certain and fixed 
revenues under any title. It is con- 
firmed by the constant practice of 
our ancient fathers. 

ANNUAL 326, Tne Bul1 Supremi 
PAYMENTS Apostolatus, Sect. 10, 
enables us to take and 
receive "annual payments of money, 
fruits, produce, oil and wine, by 
title of alms, with this condition, 
that it is understood that we have 
no judicial right to demand these 
things. 

There is evidence that our Holy 
Founder himself, in the foundation 
of the Retreat at Terracina (1748), 
did not refuse an annual subsidy 
of 50 scudi from the city. However, 
he made the condition that it should 
be by title of alms, without a strict 
obligation on the part of the city. 
It should always remain free to 
give or deny the subsidy, and our 
superiors would never have any 
right to demand it. "In this way," 
he concluded, "the holy poverty that 



We profess will remain in all its 
vigor." 19 

ACCEPTING 327 - Ma y stable 

STABLE GOODS goods, with no 
burden attached, 
be accepted on the condition that 
they be sold and the money re- 
ceived used for occuring necess- 
ities? The negative opinion de- 
fended by Fr. Patritius 20 seems 
very evident and it is founded on 
the doctrine of our Holy Founder. 
In fact, when in the year 1769 
there was question of the expedi- 
tion of the bull for solemn appro- 
bation of the Congregation, our 
Holy Founder, to whom an advance 
copy had been sent for inspection 
before publication, approved every- 
thing except the paragraph con- 
cerning the acceptance of immova- 
ble goods on condition that they be 
sold and the money used for the 
necessities of the retreats. He sent 
two religious to Msgr. Joseph 
Garampi to ask that the aforesaid 
paragraph be suppressed. "The 
learned prelate suppressed the 
clause about stable goods and left 
the rest as it is in the Bull and 
the Rule." 21 

The account of the annalist a- 
grees fully with the letter of our 
Holy Founder to Msgr. Garampi, 
dated Oct. 17, 1769.-- 

Nevertheless, there are not lack- 
ing certain considerations to the 
contrary. In the first place, there 
is the practice of superiors who 
receive stable goods, immediately 



45 



sell them and use the money for 
current necessities, not otherwise 
than sums of money from pious 
benefactors. 

That this practice is not new is 
evident from what Fr. Seraphim 
writes: "Since we cannot possess 
immovable goods, and we are pro- 
hibited from having fixed and cer- 
tain revenue, it follows that if any- 
one gives us some immovable goods 
e.g., a house, by the very fact that 
we are forbidden stable goods we 
cannot accept it and rent it out for 
a stable income, but we must sell 
it (first having the permission of 
the major superior) and then with 
the sum received provide for the 
needs of the religious commun- 
ity." 23 Such a mode of action Fr. 
Aloysius of St. Francis likewise 
maintains is licit. He says that we 
do not have to ask permission of 
the Holy Father for selling stable 
goods left or donated to the Con- 
gregation, since there is a question 
of a necessity of law: "for there 
arises a necessity to sell the thing, 
if one may possess its price, but 
not the thing itself." 24 

This doctrine seems to have some 
foundation in the decision of the 



5th General Chapter (1769) in 
which, under the presidency of our 
Holy Founder himself, it was de- 
creed that it was not licit for us 
to accept any legacies by title of 
heredity, but that we can accept 
anything left us by title of alms. 25 
The decree of the Chapter was in- 
serted into the Rule that same year 
by Clement XIV and approved in 
these words : "It is never permitted 
to acquire fixed or immovable goods 
by title of heredity or any other 
title. But if anything is given by 
title of alms, or is freely offered 
or willed for the celebration of 
Masses, it can be accepted by the 
executor of the will, only insofar 
as such an offering of Masses does 
not carry with it the perpetual I 
obligation of celebration." 26 There- 
fore, it seems, there is no difference 
between movable and immovable 
goods. Neither may be accepted by 
title of heredity, but both may be 
received by title of alms. 

Since these things are so, it does 
seem out of place for competent i 
authority to make some decision 
in the matter, to remove all doubt 
and provide a safe norm for action i 
in a matter of such importance. 



l Cf. Can. 100 2 Regula, n. 93. 3 Statuta, n. 100. 4 Regole a. 1741, cap. XVII, Proteste 
della Congr. 5 Regula, n. 98. eComment. pro Relig. XII, p. 250. 7 Oesterle, Praelect. Iuris 
Can. (1931), I, p. 276. 8 Cf . Reg. n. 93. Huic praescriptioni haud conforme videtur decretum 
V, 4, Capit. Gen, XXI, vi cuius ex largitionibus Proviniarum formanda erat summa, quae 
fructus redderet quolibet anno necessaries lampadibus alendis, quae iuxta praescriptum Capit. 
Gen. XXVIII, perpetuo collucere debebant ante altare S. Fundatoris, impensis cuius libet Pro- 
vinciae, in perpetuo fidei et amoris signum. 9 Cf. Matt, a Coronata, op. cit., n. 558. 10 Bulla 
Supremi Apostolatus, Sect. 4. n Regula, m. 93 12 Ibid., n. 104. 13 Cf. Prummer, op. cit., p. 25. 
Cocchi, Commentar. p. 94. 14 Can. 1544. 15 Collectio Facult. n. 64. 16 Cf. Elench. de Privil., 
(1909) p. 23, nota. 17 Can. 1546 et 1574. 18 Cf. Can. 6. 19 Letter e, II, p. 657. 20 P. Patrizio, I 
Lo spirito del Passionista, p. 200-201. 2iP. Giov. di. S. Ignazio, Annali, vol. I, sub anno 1769. 
22 Lettere, III, p. 729. 23 P. Seraphim, Consuetudines etc., cap. X, n. 24. 24 P. Aloysius a S. j 
Francisco Paul., Elenchus Privil., (1909), p. 35, in nota. 25 Cap. Gen. V. sees. 3, deer. 6. j 
26 Regula an. 1769, cap. XV, ca. finem, 



46 



SILENCE 

Keeping silence must be con- 
sidered as one of our principle 
obligations and we must always 
hold it in high esteem. Following 
the Holy Rule, we distinguish strict 
and common or ordinary silence, 
as well as time and place of silence. 
At times and places of strict si- 
lence we are forbidden to speak at 
all, unless for an urgent necessity, 
and then in few words and very 
softly. At times and places of ordi- 
nary silence we can, for a sufficient 
reason, converse in a moderate tone. 
The places of strict silence are 
the choir, the refectory, and the 
corridors along which the cells are 
located. The time of strict silence 
begins in the evening after rosary 
and continues until after morning 
prayer the next day. It starts again 
after noon recreation until the end 
of spiritual reading or mental 
prayer, when this takes place after 
vespers. Ordinary silence must be 
kept the rest of the time, except 
during recreation and community 
walks. Then we can converse a- 
mong ourselves and with outsiders, 
but always of useful and appro- 
priate subjects. Speaking of im- 
pertinent and superfluous topics, 
even though in places or at times 



not of strict silence, would be a 
fault for a religious. 

Although the Holy Rule does not 
say plainly that the church is a 
place of strict silence, yet it im- 
plies it when it prescribes silence 
in the choir; for modesty and de- 
votion would demand this in the 
church too. In order to insure si- 
lence in the corridors and in the re- 
fectory, even by visitors, there is 
usually a sign on the wall : Silence. 
The Holy Rule never permits si- 
lence to be dispensed in the refec- 
tory, even though princes, bishops, 
or cardinals are present. Hence, 
there is never a recreation in the 
refectory. If a banquet cannot be 
held elsewhere, nonetheless there 
must be silence and reading in the 
refectory. Moreover, we are held 
to strict silence in the refectory 
not only during meals, but all the 
time, no matter who eats there out- 
side of the community meal time, 
either religious or secular; these 
last must be informed of this ob- 
servance, especially by our example. 

Silence also means abstaining 
from making noises at forbidden 
times and places, for example, open- 
ing or shutting doors noisily, using 
loud machinery, or running care- 
lessly down the corridor. Our elders 



47 



ised to walk barefooted down the 
corridor during the time of strict 
silence, and those who had to use 
i cane because of feebleness used 
to cover the end of it with cloth. 
Keeping silence also implies mod- 
erating one's voice, even when the 
Rule allows us to speak. Conse- 
quently, we should never shout to 
anyone at a distance, but when a 
religious is wanted, he should be 
sought for or summoned by the 
call-bell. When one has to speak 
in another's cell, the voice should 
be lowered and the door closed. 
Finally, the same care should al- 
ways be exercised even during 
recreations and walks and wher- 
ever we are doing any kind of 
work, for silence is greatly con- 
ducive to the end of our Congre- 
gation and the keeping of regular 
discipline. 

SPIRITUAL READING 

ANY of our religious who is free 
of other duties can occupy 
himself in reading spiritual books. 
Moreover, every priest and cleric 
must spend some time at such read- 
ing every day. This time was de- 
fined when the new order for the 
acts of our observance was drawn 
up, after some modification by the 
Holy See. The time for spiritual 
reading was reduced to a quarter 
hour, including the examination of 
conscience preceding it. 

At the time specified in the hor- 
arium, namely before the morning 
solitary walk, the sign for this ob- 



servance is given by tapping the 
community bell. If anyone is im- 
peded at that time, he should make 
his spiritual reading at his con- 
venience. This is the practice of 
those religious who are habitually 
employed at that time, such as 
major Superiors, Lectors, confes- 
sors in retreats where many peni- 
tents come. This reading is an 
onus diei, and if it cannot be got 
in, there is no obligation of spend- 
ing double time at it the next day. 
This applies to religious on a journ- 
ey or occupied with some work of 
the ministry, to those at home who 
have some extraordinary business, 
to the sick and convalescent, and to 
all on whole days of recreation. 
As the Holy Rule leaves all of us 
free on feast days to apply to ex- 
ercises of devotion, no bell is rung 
then for spiritual reading. The 
more observant religious make use 
of this freedom by spending a half 
hour in pious reading, if their nec- 
essary occupations allow it. 

Those who attend the last Mass 
may spend the time in spiritual 
reading. The celebrant can read 
during the time of the community 
morning prayer, when he finishes 
his preparation for Mass. Although 
the Holy Rule says that the selec- 
tion of spiritual books should be 
made on the advice of one's spir- 
itual director, yet in practice only 
the clerics and brothers ask this 
advice. Only those books should be 
used during this time which offer 



48 



spiritual nourishment for the soul, 
excite it to the practice of perfec- 
tion, and increase the fire of divine 
love. It would not be considered 
spiritual reading to study scholastic 
tracts, sermons, catechetical in- 
structions, and so forth for the 
sake of acquiring knowledge. 



STUDIES 



BOTH in the morning and in the 
afternoon after prayer and 
their other duties, such as cleaning 
up their cells, our priests shall de- 
vote themselves to study until the 
sign for the next act of observance. 
The subject matter of their studies 
can easily be inferred from the 
purpose of our Congregation. Any 
kind of knowledge can be useful 
for those devoted to the salvation 
of souls, but our own study should 
be more restricted. Certainly that 
priest would be deceived who would 
think that he satisfied his obliga- 
tion by studying things foreign to 
our vocation, or by wasting time 
reading light literature, romances, 
newspapers, and the like. Likewise, 
the priests should consider it a 
fault to spend this time attending 
to other things or wandering out- 
side their cell, unless for some work 
of obedience or for hearing con- 
fessions. 

This obligation binds particularly 
our younger clerics engaged in for- 
mal study. Their education is a 
heavy burden upon the Congrega- 
tion, and they are the greatest hope 



of its future welfare. They conse- 
quently have a serious duty to put 
their best efforts into developing 
whatever talents Divine Providence 
has given them. Our clerics begin 
their studies immediately after 
their profession. The Provincial 
assigns them to the class they are 
prepared to enter. There are four 
main departments of studies : Clas- 
sical Studies, ordinarily finished be- 
fore the novitiate, Philosophy, The- 
ology, and Sacred Eloquence. While 
occupied in these, the young clerics 
remain apart from the professed. 
They are said to be in student 
life, under the direction of a priest 
called the Father Director, or, if 
he is also the teacher, he has the 
broader title of Lector. 

The training of the clerics is 
not much different from that of 
the novices. Students do not wait, 
as the novices do, for the Director 
to knock before they leave the choir 
and church, but follow the priest 
out. They do not have the rosary 
after Vespers, nor do they ask a 
special mortification in the refec- 
tory. They are not made to wear 
an eye-shade as a penance for not 
mortifying their eyes, nor do they 
have to recite three Pater's, Ave's 
and Gloria's in the middle of the 
choir with their arms outstretched 
when they arrive after the second 
bell. They never have to wear a 
blanket over their shoulder when 
they have come late to choir, but 
they must consult the Director be- 



49 



fore making an extra culpa. In 
recreation and on walks each re- 
mains with his appointed compan- 
ion, unless the Director permits 
otherwise. In other matters the 
training and customs of the noviti- 
ate are observed exactly. 

The horarium is usually as fol- 
lows : They make the hour of morn- 
ing prayer with community. After 
prayer on class days they begin 
their study, first in the study hall 
(usually the recreation room) 
where there is a light. When the 
daylight becomes sufficient, each 
goes to straighten up his room, 
until the bell for washing hands 
and face, and for breakfast. On 
days when there is enough light 
the students study in their rooms. 
After their breakfast they return 
to their rooms for study until the 
class bell rings. Class is followed 
by a quarter hour of spiritual read- 
ing, then by solitary walk, during 
which time they do their manual of- 
fices. They study again in the after- 
noon after vespers, spiritual read- 
ing (and prayer during the summer 
schedule). There is an afternoon 
class lasting till the second bell for 
Compline. The time for class shall 
be determined by each province ; 
but the time for meditation and 
solitary walk is set by the Regula- 
tions. 

The clerics shall have the same 
slight breakfast in the morning as 
the other religious ; but whenever 
there is to be a real breakfast, per- 



mission must be sought from the 
Superior. On such occasions there 
is a meal of bread, a dish of some 
kind of food such as cheese, fruit, 
and outside of Italy, butter. On 
special walk days there is a bigger 
breakfast, when anything at all may 
be eaten. 

On occasion of special solemnities 
all the clerics under the lead of 
their Director, help to decorate the 
church, serve at the sacred func- 
tions, and be ministers, if they are] 
in sacred orders. They do the sing- 
ing too, if they are good enough 
for the occasion. Therefore, those 
capable are taught to sing the cus- 
tomary selections, and for this 
there is a whole hour of practice 
each Saturday afternoon before 
Compline. The students also pre- 
pare the novena slips to be drawn 
by the religious at the beginning 
of the prescribed novenas. When 
the brothers are absent, they set 
the refectory, serve the meal, wash 
the dishes, ring the bell, and in 
brief do anything necessary to keep 
the daily observance in order. But 
the Superior and Director should 
restrict these extraordinary duties 
to those which the brothers at home 
are absolutely unable to do. 

When a student gets sick, his i 
confreres should take care of him. 
After meals someone is appointed 
by the Director to take the meal 
tray to the sickroom and to re- 
main there during recreation time. 
The professed may visit the sick 



50 



student, but he must behave humbly 
and modestly toward them. 

Student priests must rise on 
study days a half-hour before 
Prime and Tierce, so as to prepare 
to celebrate Mass during the first 
half-hour of prayer. One of them 
is given an alarm clock, and he 
awakens the others. Whoever has 
the last Mass, rises with the others 
but immediately after Tierce re- 
turns to his room. When the bell 
rings for the late Mass, he goes to 
the sacristy and makes a few min- 
utes recollection before putting on 
the sacred vestments. Once a month, 
according to the Holy Rule, each 
student goes to Father Rector for 
a spiritual conference. Except for 
some special case, this conference 
consists in seeking any desired ad- 
vice, or in receiving such admon- 
ition as the Superior deems timely. 
If there is anything to be reported 
about the professed, the student 
should first talk the matter over 
with his Director. 

If the Lector is absent or sick 
and there is no substitute for him, 
the students spend the time in 
study, with no change whatever in 
the schedule. There is no study 
or class on Saturday afternoon or 
on the vigils of the major feasts, 
because then more time is needed 
for manual offices and chant prac- 
tice. If anyone has time left over, 
he should go to his room. To keep 
the students occupied, it is the 
practice to have some scientific and 



ascetical books for their use, with 
permission of their Director. 

The Thirtieth General Chapter 
decreed that the scholastic year 
should last ten and a half months, 
with a vacation from school and 
studies for six weeks. This occurs 
in Italy and regions of similar cli- 
mate during August and Septem- 
ber; in provinces further north, 
earlier in the summer. During va- 
cation the clerics have the same 
observance as the professed, but 
with a whole-day and a half-day 
walk each week, as given by the 
Regulations. Of these days they 
have a big breakfast, even if the 
weather prevents them from leav- 
ing the monastery. If they do not 
wish or are not able to take a 
whole-day walk, they can go out 
in the morning, return for dinner, 
and go out again in the afternoon. 
All is done as determined by the 
Director, but observing the condi- 
tions laid down in the Regulations. 
On other vacation days, as well 
as on days when the weather pre- 
vents a walk, the Director some- 
times summons his charges to the 
recreation room where they can 
speak together for an hour or so. 



TAILOR SHOP 

ONE of the most necessary offices 
in our monasteries is the 
tailor shop, where our clothing is 
made, repaired, and kept. Hence, 
the room aside for this purpose 
should be sufficiently large, well 

51 



lighted, and free from dampness. 
There should be a table in the mid- 
dle ample enough to spread out a 
habit or mantle upon it. Along the 
walls are cabinets for clothing and 
linens. The tailor shop and the 
cabinets are kept locked, and the 
tailor keeps the key. The Brother 
Tailor should become experienced 
in making our clothes according to 
the usual form and of washing 
them. Hence, he will have to know 
how to make soap from left-over 
fats and oils. 

As our outer garments are kept 
in our cells, therefore only the un- 
der garments and certain other 
items are kept in the tailor shop, 
such as: pillowslips, night-caps, 
handkerchiefs towels, blankets, lin- 
ens, as well as table-cloths and nap- 
kins for the religious and visitors. 
All these things are to be purchased 
by the tailor, with the consent of 
the Superior, so that they will be on 
hand when needed. 

Habits and mantles are made and 
given to the religious in the order 
of dignity and of profession, be- 
ginning from the Superior. The 
old habits are turned in, and the 
tailor washes them and keeps them 
for the brothers to use as third 
habits. If they are useless, they 
are cut into pieces and kept for 
patching. Old mantle-cloth can be 
used to replace the sleeves of habits, 
which usually wear out in a year's 
time. Some usuable mantles and 
habits should be kept on hand for 



unforeseen necessities. During 
habit-making season in larger 
monasteries, the Brother is usually 
given the help of another Brother 
or even a neighboring secular tail- 
or, at least for part of the time. 

The tailor makes the other 
clothes as needed, but always under 
the direction of the Superior. He 
usually does this during the time 
of the year that is freest. How- 
ever, he should be on hand to sew 
and wash the tunics and mantles 
of the religious, especially when 
one is transferred to another re- 
treat or when one is going to a 
more refined and urbane district. 
The brothers ordinarily do their 
own sewing and washing, but the 
tailor helps them as much as nec- 
essary. 

There should be complete laun- 
dry accommodations in the monas- 
tery. In due time the tailor in- 
forms the Superior of wash day, 
and he in turn tells the religious at 
evening sentiment, so that they 
may have time to change their 
clothing and throw all their wash 
in the appointed place. Handker- 
chiefs and blankets are washed 
separately at other times. All the 
brothers, except those who are un- 
able, lend a hand at the wash, under 
the direction of the tailor. General- 
ly, the wash is done at night, even 
after Matins, so that the brothers 
can be available during the morn- 
ing prayer time to serve Masses. 
(Continued on page 99) 



52 




PASSIONIST NEWS REVIEW 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE 



CHICAGO 



Immaculate Conception Retreat 
joyfully welcomed Very Rev. Fr. Pro- 
vincial home from his journey to 
Japan, where he was investigating 
the possiblities of a new foundation 
in that country. His December 20th 
return coincided with one of the 
worst snow storms the city has seen 
in a number of years. 

Mrs. Kathleen Barry Ahern, moth- 
er of Rev. Fr. Barnabas, C.P., Lector 
of Sacred Scripture, passed away sud- 
denly on Sunday, Dec. 16. She re- 
ceived all the sacraments of the 
Church, although Rev. Fr. Barnabas 
was unable to reach her bedside be- 
fore her death. She was buried from 
the Church of St. John Baptist de la 
Salle. Most of the Community was 
present at the funeral Mass, sung 
by the Students. R.I.P. 



The Sacred Eloquence Refresher 
Course opened January 6 for a two 
weeks stay. All were immensely 
pleased with the results, and are gen- 
uinely grateful to Rev. Fr. Pius, C.P., 
for his persevering hard work to 
make the Course eminently success- 
ful and useful. Recently, more than 
70 new Mission Units have arrived 
from the factory. After minor ad- 
justments they were shipped to the 
various Monasteries. 




View of the new garage recently com- 
pleted at Immaculate Conception Mon- 
astery, Chicago, Illinois. 

53 



This Retreat has been the scene of 
great and varied activity, and the im- 
provements were quite notable. First 
of all, the new garage, completed 
since the last issue of The Passionist, 
proved indispensable during the se- 
vere winter. Immaculate Conception 
Parish School has also completed its 
addition. The new wing contains, on 
the second floor, two large, very- 
bright classrooms, a washroom and 
the boys' Sacristy. The first floor 
houses the parish offices, reception 
room, large assembly room, filing 
room, etc. This much needed addi- 
tion provides the class room space 
that has been wanting for several 
years. Within the Monastery, 80 
standard library shelves have been 



installed in the recreation room, and 
more are to be placed in the Library. 
Plans include renovation of the Pub- 
lic Chapel. The Students have con- 
structed a handball court with col- 
lapsible walls in the old laundry 



CINCINNATI 

St. Paul of the Cross Laymen's 
Retreat League, of Holy Cross Mon- 
astery, held its third annual Thanks- 
giving Day Rally, November 22, at 
the Cathedral of St. Peter in Chains. 
The Old Cathedral was filled to cap- 
acity for the Mass and most of the 
men received Holy Communion. 

Rev. Fr. Emmanuel, C.P., preached 
an eloquent sermon, "Plymouth Rock, 




:?■' ■':''--• -''".'-. 



View of the wing to Immaculate Conception School, Norwood Park, Illinois. 
It contains two large class rooms, offices, assembly rooms, etc. 

54 





This picture was taken at a Shinto Temple in Nikko, Japan, about 75 miles 
North of Tokyo. Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick, left, and Most Rev. Fr. Malcolm, 
were in Japan to look over the possibilities of a new Passionist Mission to 
the Japanese. 



the Rock of the Altar and Freedom." 
He reminded the men that "Thanks 
giving is a most practical form of 
adoration. If we are truly thankful, 
we will make reparation for our sins, 
because these are nothing but in- 
gratitude. The most powerful way 
to obtain new favors is to be grateful 
for those already received. 'With 
thanksgiving, let your petitions be 
made known to God.' In the Mass, 



we have Christ offering thanks for 
us." 

Father Jansen, Pastor at the Cath- 
edral, celebrated the Mass, a Missa 
Recitata. During and before the 
Mass itself, Confessions were heard 
by Rev. Frs. Angelo, Hilary and 
Donald. Rev. Fr. Wilfrid, Retreat 
Director, led the men in the Missa 
Recitata. 



55 



One of the local papers noted, on 
Dec. 13, 1951, "The Passionist Fa- 
thers at Holy Cross Monastery, on 
Mt. Adams, are making plans for 
their 200th Retreat for Catholic Men 
since the Monastery was opened for 
Laymen's Retreats five years ago. 
Although the 200th Retreat will not 
occur until the week-end of April 18- 
20, 1952, the Passionist Fathers look 
ahead to the event with pride because 
it will symbolize the popularity the 
Retreat Movement for Laymen has 
gained in a short span of years. An 
average of 30 to 40 Catholic men 
have been attending the week-end 
Retreats from 6:30 p.m. Friday to 
7 p.m. Sunday, in the 80 year old 
Monastery on Mt. Adams. The Rev. 
Wilfrid Flannery, C.P. is the present 
Retreat Director, and the Rev. An- 
gelo Hamilton, C.P. is the Retreat 
Preacher." 



Rev. Fr. Arthur's sister, Mrs. Mary 
Brady, widow of Doctor Charles 
Brady, of Parsons, Kansas, died 
Christmas morning. Walter Maher, 
brother of Rev. Fr. Daniel, C.P., of 
Holy Cross Monastery, who was a 
radio and stage personality known 
to many of the Fathers, died Dec. 27, 
1951. R.I.P. 



LOUISVILLE 

Sacred Heart Retreat witnessed the 
inspiring ordination ceremony once 
more, December 22, when five Sub- 
deacons were raised to the Diaconate, 
Most Rev. John A. Floersh, D.D., 
Archbishop of Louisville, came to 
perform the ceremony at St. Agnes 
Church, and the Community took 
part in making the occasion a solemn 



and happy one. The five new Deacons 
are the Rev. Frs. Caspar, John Mary, 
Peter Claver, Luke and Clement. 

During January, Rev. Fr. Roger, 
C.P., Director of Students, added an- 
other endeavor to his excellent work 
with the Archconfraternity of the 
Passion. The first meeting, a sort of 
trial balloon, was held at Sacred 
Heart Retreat, January 18, 1952. The 
name given the new organization, if 
such it can be called, is The Passion 
Forum. Through the Forum it is pro- 
posed to give instructions or informal 
lectures upon the different aspects of 
the Passion — theological, scriptural, 
historical and spiritual. It is an at- 
tempt to help the Catholic layman 
deepen his knowledge of the Suffer- 
ings and Death of Christ, through 
informal study and lectures. 

The initial meeting drew a fine 
crowd. Consequently, the meetings 
will be held at Nazareth College, ev- 
ery third Friday. It is not intended 
that these classes or forums take the 
place of the monthly Confraternity 
meetings. On the contrary, it is hoped 
that the Passion Forum will make 
them more popular and helpful. 



Sacred Heart Retreat welcomed a 
new member to the Community when 
Rev. Fr. Francis Flaherty, C.P. was 
transferred to Louisville in January. 
He will assume the Chaplaincy of 
Our Lady of Peace Hospital. Father 
Francis was featured in a fine article 
in The Record, the local Archdiocesan 
paper. 

ST. PAUL, KANSAS 

St. Francis Retreat celebrated a 
memorable December 8th. That day 
saw the Temporary Profession of 



56 



three young Brothers, a happy oc- 
casion not only for the Community 
but likewise for the whole Province. 
It was an especially memorable day 
for Brothers Joachim, Francis and 
Leonard, one that saw for them the 
fulfillment of the words of the In- 
troit: "I will greatly rejoice in the 
Lord, and my soul shall be joyful in 
my God; for he hath clothed me with 
the garments of salvation, and with 
the robe of justice he hath covered 

me " 

Brother Joachim (Saunders) of 
Jesus and Mary, C.P. is a native of 
Florrissant, Mo. Brother Francis 
(Hanis) hails from Kansas City, 
Kansas, while Brother Leonard (Pas- 
chali) was born in Warren ville, Il- 
linois. 



The Novices, with characteristic 
good will and ingenuity, accomplished 
an excellent job decorating the 
Church, Chapel, Choir and Monastery 
for the feast of Christmas. The elab- 
orate preparations for the Christmas 
ceremonies was fully repaid those 
who participated in the beautiful lit- 
urgy of the feast. 

The monastery bells broke the si- 
lence of the Kansas night calling all 
to the midnight office. By eleven 
o'clock the large church was three- 
fourths filled. Very Rev. Fr. Rector 
was assisted by Rev. Fr. Master and 
Fr. Ronan during the Solemn Divine 
Office. Although the singing and 
recitation of the office occupied the 
space of an hour the parishioners 
were most attentive. As they entered 
the church each was given a program 
containing a short explanation and 
commentary on the hour of Matins. 



Thus they were able to follow the 
progress of the Church's official 
prayer with understanding and ease. 
At midnight every available seat 
in the church was filled by members 
of the parish who had gathered to 
take an active part in the celebration 
of the midnight Mass. Preparation 
for this event had begun the first 
Sunday of Advent when they re- 
mained ten minutes after each mass 
to practice singing the Kyrie, Gloria, 
Sanctus and Agnus Dei according 
to Fr. Claude's arrangement. All, 
including Fr. Charles who directed 
the practice periods and the singing 
on the occasion itself, were amply 
rewarded by the fine performance of 
an enthusiastic congregation. The 
Proper of the Mass, the Credo, and 
the traditional Christmas Hymns 
were expertly rendered by the Novi- 
tiate Choir. 



DES MOINES 

The fathers of St. Gabriel's Monas- 
tery spent the first two weeks of De- 
cember in the Refresher Course, this 
year dedicated to the work of preach- 
ing the Passion. Much valuable help 
and inspiration was imparted by Fr. 
Pius, by his lectures and in the prac- 
tice of Passion meditations and mo- 
tives. 



Brother Thomas Brummet, C.P., 
took his Final Vows and pronounced 
the Oath of Perseverance in the pres- 
ence of the Community, assembled on 
the Feast of the Purification, Febru- 
ary 2. Very Rev. Fr. Bernard Mary, 
C.P., Rector, was delegated to receive 
the profession. The occasion was 
made a happy one for the newly pro- 



57 



fessed Brother Thomas by the pres- 
ence of his mother, Mrs. John Brum- 
met, and his brothers and sisters, 
from Toledo, Ohio. 



Rev. Fr. Finan Storey, C.P., be- 
came a member of this Community 
in mid-December, following his trans- 
fer from Louisville. The province will 
be happy to learn that Rev. Fr. Ig- 
natius Conroy, C.P., returned from 
the hospital, and is feeling improved. 



DETROIT 

St. Paul's Monastery was very 
nearly snowbound part of the winter. 
Beginning shortly before Christmas, 
the snow totaled an official 31 inches 
by New Years. It was a constant 
fight against the elements to keep ap- 
proaches to the Monastery open, and 
sometimes it was a losing fight. 
Along would come another snow 
storm just as the roads were cleared. 

Rev. Fr. Robert Cook, C.P., has 
returned home from the hospital, 
where he had been taken following 
a severe heart attack the Thursday 
before Christmas. Father Robert had 
caught a cold with the coming of the 
snows. Subsequent sneezing and 
coughing caused him to slip a disk in 
his spine, causing a great deal of 
pain. The weakening effects of the 
cold and the pain in his back over- 
loaded his heart, and he suffered a 
severe heart attack. Because of the 
threatening weather, he was taken 
to the Hospital, where there would be 
constant care. By digging through 
snow banks, the car was able to get 
through, about ten o'clock, Dec. 21. 
At noon, he was apparently resting 
well, but at two o'clock the heart at- 



tack came, and in a short time he was 
in a serious condition. A fierce bliz- 
zard was raging, and it was impos- 
sible for any of the Fathers to reach 
the Hospital, so the Chaplain anoint- 
ed Father. By four o'clock, under 
oxygen, Father Robert had regained 
consciousness, but was in need of 
oxygen until New Years. Father is 
doing well, at present, but is still con- 
fined to the Infirmary and the first 
floor. 

Rev. Fr. Linus, C.P., who subbed 
for Fr. Robert after his heart attack, 
has done an excellent job preaching 
the Laymen's Retreats. In spite of 
the weather and the difficulty of tra- 
veling, the Retreats have been nearly 
up .to average. One Retreat brought 
44 men, two over capacity. 



SIERRA MADRE 

The torrential downpours so pub- 
licized in this area by the Eastern 
papers did not inflict too much dam- 
age on Mater Dolorosa Monastery 
and Retreat House property. Some of 
the surrounding district, nevertheless, 
was hard hit. The average quota for 
January was quintupled by the con- 
tinuous rains. 



Very Rev. Fr. James Patrick 
stopped here on his way to look over 
the prospects of making a new Jap- 
anese foundation in the Orient. His 
visit coincided with the death of an 
old friends of the Monastery, Mr. 
John Pionke, a brother-in-law of 
Mr. Joseph McNeil, contractor for the 
new Mater Dolorosa Laymen's Re- 
treat House and an outstanding bene- 
factor. Fr. Provincial, together with 
Fr. Michael, assisted at the death bed 



58 



and led the prayers for the dying. 
The presence of two Passionists was 
a great consolation to the relatives, 
for Mr. Pionke had always had a 
great devotion to the Passion of Our 
Lord. 



Rev. Fr. Jerome, C.P., of Christ the 
King Monastery, in Citrus Heights, 
conducted a splendid Community Re- 
treat, beginning January 8th. The 
Community some weeks later cele- 
brated with two of its members, as 
Rev. Frs. Martin Matthews and Phil- 
ip Gibbons, C.P., noted their Silver 
Jubilee in the Holy Priesthood, on 
February 27th. 



Mater Dolorosa Laymen's Retreat 
House, in noting the statistics for the 
past year, 1951, observed that 3388 
men came to make Retreats during 
the year. The week-end retreats av- 
eraged 71 men each, while the mid- 
week retreats averaged 10. 179 of 
the men were non-Catholics. 1301 
were new-comers to Mater Dolorosa. 



HOUSTON 

The past months at Holy Name Re- 
treat have been notable for the per- 
fect Texas weather. While the North 
and West Coast Coast have been 
staggering under the hardest blows 
delivered in years by Old Man Winter, 
South Texas has been luxuriating in 
tropical breezes. 

Outside the weather note, not much 
has happened down in our country's 
largest state. The Mayor of nearby 
Galveston was jailed for three days 
for not obeying the laws, but that is 
more or less normal. 



The health of the Community has 
been good, and the Missionaries are 
in the swing of a full Mission season. 
As of the present, the five priests at 
Holy Name Retreat count among 
them 17 weeks of Missions, 12 Re- 
treats, 3 Days of Recollection and 4 
Cana Conferences. 



OUR PARISHES 

At Holy Family Parish, Ensley, 
statistics showed that at the end of 
1951 it had seen 69 adult converts 
during the previous twelve months. 
This brings to 629 the grand total of 
baptisms since the Parish was found- 
ed. 

Rev. Fr. Edmund, C.P., built a 
forty foot stage for Holy Family Hall, 
and the choir put on a Christmas 
pageant that was most attractive. 
Mr. Bodde, of California, donated the 
stage and the spotlights for the per- 
formance. The Midnight Mass was 
completely crowded, and people were 
standing in the street. The Crib was 
the prettiest in town, and the Choir, 
which Most Rev. Bishop Toolen has 
praised as the best he has heard since 
he has been a Bishop, sang marvel- 
ously. 

The Government has given no fur- 
ther indication that the new Holy 
Family Hospital may proceed. Gov- 
ernment funds are still not available. 

Holy Family High School Basket- 
ball team is compiling an excellent 
record this year. They outlasted the 
Seminarians from Cullman 32-31. 
They won handily over four other 
teams, and expect to win over most 
of the remaining teams on the sche- 
dule. The boys are looking forward 
to the State Tournament. 



59 



PROVINCE OF ST. PAUL OF THE 
CROSS 

The houses of the Province are 
preparing for the Centenary celebra- 
tions to be held during the month of 
April, on or close to the Feast of St. 
Paul of the Cross. A special broad- 
cast on 'The Life of St. Paul of the 
Cross' will be heard on Sunday even- 
ing, April 27, on the Ave Maria Hour. 
The Atonement Fathers of Graymoor 
have graciously offered to sponsor 
this broadcast and as a special favor 
to the Congregation, they are making 
unusual arrangements to have the 
broadcast heard simultaneously over 
the more than 300 stations through- 
out the country which carry the Ave 



Maria Hour. The script was written 
by Father Kenan Carey, C.P. of the 
Hartford Community. 

In conjunction with the Centenary, 
both Provinces are collaborating on 
an illustrated Brochure which will 
show the growth of the Congregation 
in America during the past hundred 
years. Father Ronald Norris and 
Bonaventure Griffiths of the East and 
Father Warren Womack of the 
West are producing the Brochure. 

The Provincial Curia will sail for 
Rome on March 28 to attend the Gen- 
eral Chapter. As a result, the mem- 
bers of the Curia will not be able to 
be present for the Centenary celebra- 
tions in the United States. After the 




Holy Family Monastery and Retreat House (front), West Hartford, Conn. The 
Chapel, center, connects the two buildings. The Retreat House will accom- 
modate about 120 men for week-end retreats. The Community numbers 50. 
The Cross in the tower is lighted at night, and can be seen from miles away. 



60 



Chapter, the Curia will take part in 
the Eucharistic Congress to be held 
in Barcelona. 

FATHER MATTHEW KUEBEL 

The Province was very much sad- 
dened to learn of the sudden death 
of Father Matthew on All Souls Day. 
He was a member of the Community 
at Riverdale, N.Y., and Chronicler of 
the Province. While he was troubled 
for some time with a heart condi- 
tion, it was not so pronounced as to 
cause great alarm. On the day before 
All Souls he suffered an attack while 
at dinner. The next day he did not go 
out to say Mass for the Visitation Sis- 
ters as he did each day but remained 
home to rest a bit. He said his three 
Masses in the community chapel and 
then heard several more. After his 
breakfast, he went upstairs to begin 
another day's work on the Chronicles. 
Father Gerald Matejune heard Fa- 
ther Matthew call him and ran to his 
aid. He found him stricken with a 
severe heart attack. Father Benedict 
Huck, the Superior, had the doctor 
called, anointed the fast failing priest 
who died in the arms of his Superior 
before the doctor arrived. 

Father Matthew was appointed his- 
torian of the Province in 1944. Prior 
to that he had spent the greater part 
of his priestly life as a Lector. He 
was an English and Latin classi- 
cist. From 1928 to 1933 he taught 
Theology to the students of the Aus- 
trian-German Vice Province. For sev- 
en years after his return to the Unit- 
ed States he was Lector of Ascetical 
Theology in various monasteries. 

His funeral was held from our 
Monastery Church of St. Joseph in 
Baltimore on November 5. His Pa- 



ternity, Father Provincial was the 
celebrant, The Rector of St. Joseph's, 
Father Colman Healey, was the Dea- 
con and Father Harold Poletti, sub- 
deacon. Father Alfred Duffy, of St. 
Michael's, Union City, preached the 
eulogy. 

CHRIS MCKENNA 

The first death in the Province in 
the year 1952 was neither priest, 
student or brother but that of a great 
souled layman, Chris McKenna, who 
for 34 years served the community of 
St. Gabriel's, Brighton, night and 
day. In 1918, Chris made a week- 
end retreat with other laymen. A 
week later he came back to the mon- 
astery and never left it again. For 
some time he assisted in cleaning the 
retreat rooms and serving the meals. 
Later he was made the Porter of the 
monastery and decade after decade 
fulfilled that trying monotonous task 
faithfully and well. 

Everyone who came to the monas- 
tery knew Chris and Chris knew ev- 
eryone, Bishops and Monsignors, 
priests, officials, benefactors, pledge- 
seekers and the repertory of down 
and outers. He knew all by name and 
made everyone welcome in a cheery 
way. It was his delight to reserve a 
special welcome to the priests of our 
Congregation when they arrived at 
the monastery. Living always in the 
monastery, Chris McKenna never 
ventured to identify himself with the 
community or take the slightest lib- 
erty in his contact with the priests 
of the house. He was a layman, dedi- 
cated to the service of the monastery, 
but he ever had the deep respect and 
veneration for the priest. 

The last few years of his life were 



61 




The Funeral of Chris McKenna 



spent in suffering. He was ill and 
almost totally blind. Yet his life was 
an edification to all — daily he prayed 
and prayed. The day after Christ- 
mas, 1951, when death seemed immi- 
nent he was admitted to private vows 
in the congregation. He died on Jan- 
uary 4, and was buried in the Pas- 
sionist habit. 

Father Provincial sang the Solemn 
Funeral Mass assisted by the Rector 
of St. Gabriel's, Father Dennis Walsh, 
and Father Jude Meade as subdeacon. 
Father Lucian Ducie, Director of 
Laymen's Retreats preached the eu- 
logy. Chris McKenna was buried in 
the community cemetery. 

The Province of St. Paul of the 
Cross is happy to welcome into its 
ranks the Pere Antoine de Groeve, 



C.P., who for years was associated 
with the American Passionists in the 
mission fields of Hunan. Father An- 
toine was born in Bruges in 1885. He 
entered the French Vincentians and 
was ordained in 1910, leaving almost 
immediately for China where for ten 
years he labored in the French Vi- 
centian missions of Chekiang. 

He returned to France and entered 
the Passionist novitiate of the French 
Province and was professed on Jan- 
uary 1, 1921. He was appointed Vice 
Master and the Master of Novices. 
After his second term as Master he 
requested permission to return to 
China to serve with the Passionist 
Missionaries in Hunan. He arrived in 
Hunan in 1929. From then until 1951, 
with the exception of two short fur- 



62 



loughs, he spent himself working 
among the Chinese. In April of 1951, 
Pere Antoine was compelled to leave 
China and return to Europe because 
of the Communist activities in his 
mission area. 

Since the greater part of his life as 
a Passionist has been spent in the 
service of the Province of St. Paul 
of the Cross, permission was granted 
him to become a member of the pro- 
vince. He arrived in the United 
States on January 14 of this year. 

Pere Antoine is a noted linguist 
and classic latinist. He will be a 
valuable adjunct to the province. 

CHANGES IN THE PROVINCE 

Father Provincial has lately made 
a number of changes in the province. 
Father David Bulman, associate edi- 
tor of the Sign since 1943, was as- 
signed to Springfield as a member of 
the mission band. He was replaced 
on the Sign by Father FABIAN 
FLYNN. Father Fabian was or- 
dained in 1931. He was engaged in 
giving missions and retreats and for 
a few years was associate editor of 
the Sign. In 1942 he entered the army 
as a chaplain and saw service in the 
African, Sicilian and European cam- 
paigns, being awarded the Silver Star, 
the Bronze Star with two Oak Leaf 
Clusters, the Purple Heart and the 
Belgian Croix de Guerre. After VE 
day he was appointed port chaplain 
at Le Havre and later served with the 
French military in the French Zone 
of occupation. In 1945, Supreme 
Court Justice Jackson appointed him 
Catholic Chaplain to the Internation- 
al Tribunal at Nurnberg. While hold- 
ing this position Father Fabian was 



in contact with Goering and his as- 
sociates who were convicted and ex- 
ecuted. After his return to America 
he was sent as a field representative 
of the War Relief Services to French 
occupied Germany in Freiburg. At 
the termination of this work he was 
appointed to the Sign. 

Father James McAghon, assistant 
Business Manager of the Sign has 
been assigned to Hartford. Father 
Cronan Flynn, Sign Fieldman was 
appointed curate in the Jamaica par- 
ish succeeding Claude Ennis who was 
transferred to Union City. William 
Harding was transferred from Union 
City to Riverdale to replace Gerald 
Matejune who went to Hartford. Ber- 
ard Tierney was transferred from 
Hartford to Scranton, Benedict Mawn 




Pere Antione De Groeve 



63 



from Scranton to Dunkirk (St. 
Mary's) and Cletus Mulloy from 
Dunkirk to Boston. Columba McClos- 
key was transferred from Boston to 
Baltimore and Damian Rail from 
Baltimore to Union City. Bertrand 
Weaver and Kenneth Naudin were 
moved from Springfield to Union 
City and Myles McCarthy from Union 
City to Springfield. The missionaries 
who recently returned from China 
were given assignments: Reginald 
Arliss to Union City; Ronald Beaton 
to Hartford; Dominic Cohee to Bal- 
timore; Ernan Johnston to Pitts- 
burgh. 

Father Raphael Vance of China 
continues slowly to improve at St. 
Joseph's Hospital, Paterson, N.J. The 
Province is sorry to learn of Cyril 
Feeley's illness. He is in St. Mary's 
Hospital, Hoboken, with a coronary 
occlusion. His place as Mission Sec- 
retary is being filled temporarly by 
Clement Buckley, one of the directors 
of the Refresher Course. 

The Province offers its congratula- 
tions to the thirteen new priests who 
were ordained by Bishop McNulty, 
Auxiliary of Newark, in St. Michael's 
Monastery Church, Union City, Feb- 



ruary 28. A later issue of the Bulle- 
tin will contain information and pic- 
tures. 

Brother Damian of the Novitiate 
staff and Brother Simon, Supervisor 
of Junior Brothers in Hartford, vis- 
ited St. Meinrad's Monastery to study 
certain aspects in connection with 
the future training of our young 
brothers. They were well received 
and hospitably given every assist- 
ance. 

The Province offers sincere sym- 
pathy to members of the Province 
who have suffered bereavement since 
the last issue of the Bulletin. Broth- 
er Sebastian Bullen who lost his fa- 
ther on December 8, 1951; Father 
Chrysostom Ryan, mother on Janu- 
ary 13; Regis Mulligan, mother on 
January 23; Ignatius Formica, father 
on February 4. Brother Thomas Aul 
of Union City lost his brother John, 
an Army sergeant, who with his wife 
and two small children, was killed 
in a tragic accident in North Caro- 
lina. The car in which they were 
driving to Pittsburgh for a wedding 
was demolished in collision with a 
huge trailer truck and all killed in- 
stantly. 



PROVINCES ABROAD 



SPAIN 

Holy Family Province sends news 
of great interest to the whole Con- 
gregation. On December 6th, at Sara- 
goza, was solemnly closed the Dio- 
cesan Process for the Beatification of 
the 26 Passionists who were mar- 
tyred during the Civil War of 1936 
in Spain. The Ordinary Process for 
these members of the Holy Family 



Province, who now lie in the crypt of 
at Daimiel, Ciudad Real, was opened 
May 8, 1948. 

The official act of closing the Pro- 
cess was made notable by the pres- 
ence of many illustrious members of 
the Clergy, who, together with His 
Excellency, Don Emeterio Echeverria 
y Barrena, Bishop of Ciudad Real, 
and Very Rev. Fr. Innocent of the 



64 



MARTIRES PASIONISTA: 




% . • - 

Picture of the twenty-six Passionists who fell before the fury of the Com- 
munists during July, 1936. Their cause for Beatification is under way. (Cf. 
Passionist, Nov. 21, 1948). 

1. P. Juan Pedro de S. Antonio (Vicario) 2. Cho. Honorino de la V., 
Dolorosa 3. P. Niceforo de Jesus y Maria (Provincial) 4. Cho. Julio del 
Corazon de Jesus 5. P. German de Jesus y Maria (Rector) 6. Cho. 
Eufrasio del Amor Misericordioso 7. P. Ildefonso de la Cruz 8. Cho. 
Fulgencio del Corazon de Maria 9. Cho. Jose Maria de Jesus Agonizante 
10. Cho. Jose Maria de Jesus 11. Cho. Tomas del Santisimo Sacramento 
12. Cho Jose de los Sagrados Corazones 13. Cho Felix de las Cinco 
Llagas 14. Cho. Jose de Jesus y Maria 15. Cho. Abilio de la Cruz 
16. P. felipe del aSgrado Corazon de Maria 17. Cho. Laurino de Jesus 
Crucificado 18. Cho Zacarias del Santisimo Sacramento 19. Hno. 
Felipe de S. Miguel 20. Cho. Epifanio de S. Miguel 21. Hno. Benito 
de la V. del Villar 22. P. Pedro del Corazon de Jesus 23. P. Justiniano 
de S. Gabriel de la Dolorosa 24. Hno. Pablo Maria de S. Jose 25. Cho. 
Maurilio del Nino Jesus 26. Hno. Anacario de la Immaculada. 

65 







Picture taken at the Official Closing of the Process for Beatification of the 
26 Passionists of Holy Family Province killed by the Spanish Reds in 1936. 



Patronage of St. Joseph, Provincial 
of the Province of the Holy Family, 
took part in the ceremonies. 

Rev. Fr. Aureliano, C.P., Vice Pos- 
tulator of the cause, who did such 
excellent work in bringing the Pro- 
cess to a successful conclusion, has 
now gone to Rome to carry on his 
work with the Sacred Congregation 
of Rites. 




Rev. Fr. Aureliano, C.P., Vice-Postu- 
lator in the Cause of the 26 Passion- 
ists killed by the Reds. 

66 



On December 7th, the day follow- 
ing the closing of the Process, the 
city of Daimiel opened its Mission. 
Daimiel is a city of 25,000 people. The 
Mission was preached entirely by the 
Passionist Fathers, and was centered 
in four different Churches. This Mis- 
sion calls to mind the gigantic one 
that was staged at Barcelona, dur- 
ing the Holy Year. 



FRANCE 

Through the kindness of the Very 
Reverend Father Provincial of St. 
Michael's Province, we have received 
notice of an article on Our Holy 
Founder in a recent edition of Revue 
D'Ascetique et de Mystique. The ar- 
ticle is a lengthy study entitled "The 
Will of God in the Letters of St. Paul 
of the Cross." It covers over forty 
pages octavo, lavishly quoting and 



referring to the Letters. In an intro- 
ductory note the author, a M. Viller, 
refers to the excellent works of Rev. 
Fr. Cajetan of the Holy Name of 
Mary, C.P., saying: "I have always 
made use of the very meritorious 
works of Father Cajetan of the Holy 
Name of Mary, in particular his Doc- 
trine de Saint Paul de la Croix sur 
l'oraison et la mystique. In this book 
the author points out excellently how 




View of the new Calvary Group at Schwarzenfeld, Germany. This is the 12th 
Station in the Via Crucis recently constructed around the grounds. Left side, 
top to bottom: Very Rev. Fr. Victor Kock, Confr. Andrew, Fr. Celestino (Italy), 
Bro. Bernard, Fr. Paul. Right, top to bottom: Fr. Adrian, Bro. Gabriel, Fr. 
Frederick and Fr. Norbert. 



67 



the Saint is in such close accord with 
four of the great mystics: Tauler, 
St. Teresa, St. John of the Cross and 
St. Francis de Sales. It seems to me, 
nevertheless, that Fr. Cajetan, while 
very attentive to the resemblances, 
has not stressed enough their diver- 
gences and what is characteristic 
and personal. ... It is minimizing a 
man so original as the Founder of the 
Passionists to try to make him con- 
form to those who went before him. 
The part of the Passion in his mysti- 
cal teaching is even greater than he 
has pointed out. . . ." 



GERMANY 

In May, 1941, the Schwarzenfeld 
Monastery was occupied by the Nazis. 




The Fathers then present at the Ren 
treat, Very Rev. Fr. Victor, Very 
Rev. Fr. Walter, Rev. Frs. Paul and 
Bernhard, vowed to build a Via Cru. 
cis, if the Monastery would be spared 
and returned to the Passionists. The 
end of the war found the money situ^ 
ation such that the Fathers were 
unable to fulfill their vow until 1951, 
when they constructed the new Via 
Crucis. The 12th Station was built 
in the form of a Calvary Group, 
through the generosity of certain: 
benefactors. 



View of one of the new outdoor sta- 
tions at Schwarzenfeld, Germany. 

68 



ENGLAND 

St. Joseph's Province has recently 
undertaken a Mission to Sweden: 
The district assigned to the English 
Passionists by the Vicar Apostolic oft 
Sweden is the 7,000 square mile ter- 
ritory of Swaland, the center ofi 
which is Vaxjo. The number ofi 
known Catholics in this region isi 
approximately 120, most of whomi 
are displaced persons from Central, 
Europe. 

On Tuesday, October 16, 1951, Rev. 
Fr. Dominic Drumm, C.P., and Rev.< 
Fr. Ignatius McElligott, C.P., who 
have been appointed as pioneers of 
the mission, left St. Joseph's Retreat,: 
Highgate, London. Before their de- 
parture, Solemn High Mass was cele- 
brated in the presence of His Excel- 
lency, Most Rev. Jeremiah Pesce,? 
C.P., Vicar Apostolic of Dodoma, 
Tanganyka. 

In a letter to the Readers of II Divini 
Crocifisso, Monsignor Pesce wrote: j 
"The 16th of October was a memor-l 
able day for this Province, made soj 
by the departure of two missionaries! 
for Sweden. This entire nation hasi 



but one Vicar Apostolic, Monsignor 
Muller, who has forty priests to aid 
him. Catholics in Sweden number 
hardly 5000. After the last war, a 
considerable number of refugees 
found asylum in Sweden and raised 
the number of Catholics to 11,000, 
scattered here and there. 

"The zealous Bishop took his needs 
to the Sacred Congregation for the 
Propagation of the Faith and the 
Major Superiors of the Passionists 
in Rome, asking for their help in the 
vast field of his Vicariate. The Eng- 
lsh Province courageously accepted 

the difficult assignment The first 

two men chosen by Providence are 
Fathers Dominic Drumm and Igna- 
tius McElligott, the first of whom is 
the Superior. Father Ignatius is not 
new to this field of labour, for he first 
came early last Spring to learn the 
language and the problems of the 
new Mission. He was received cor- 
dially and began to preach after only 
one month. He was heard with great 
interest, and the Catholics came for- 
ward to welcome and congratulate 
him. He had but recently returned 
to England to acquaint his Superiors 
with conditions, and to prepare for 
the departure of the Mission. . . . 

Monsignor Pesce also wrote: "On 
October 21, 22 and 23, I gave the 
Tonsure and the Minor Orders to our 
Theology Students in London. My 
first ordinations were for our Eng- 
lsh students! The following morning 
(at Sutton) I descended into the crypt 
of our Church, to kneel before the 
tomb of the great Apostle of Eng- 
land, our own Venerable Dominic, 
and ask him to obtain for me the 
spirit of the apostolate for the salva- 



tion of the souls confided to my care. 
"Our Retreat here is the center of 
a magnificent spiritual garden, as it 
were, an oasis where Christian life 
flourishes vigorously. The schools 
conducted by our Passionist Sisters 
care for more than six hundred boys 
and girls. How much joy it must give 
Ven. Father Dominic to see his sons 
spend themselves with such zeal for 
the salvation of these people." 



IRELAND 

The Province of St. Patrick was 
invited by the Holy See, during the 
latter part of 1951, to undertake a 
Mission in Bechuanaland. The first 
group of Missionaries are preparing 




Dr. Albert Possenti, son of Dr. Michael 
Possenti, brother of St. Gabriel. He 
is 75 years old, very vigorous and 
witty. He is shown with the Rector 
of St. Gabriel's Retreat, at Isoltu 



69 



for their departure. The Superior of 
the Mission will be Rev. Fr. Theodore 
Matthews, C.P. He will be aided by 
Rev. Fr. Urban Murphy, C.P., Rev. 
Fr. Norbert Morris, C.P., and Rev. 
Fr. Carthage Power, C.P. 

Bechuanaland lies in the sub-trop- 
ics just North of the Union of South 
Africa. It is bounded on the West by 
Southwest Africa, on the East by 
Southern Rodesia and the Transvaal, 
and on the North by Northern Rho- 
desia. In size, it is roughly seven 
times that of Ireland, but it is very 
thinly populated. The total popula- 
tion is estimated at about 600,000, the 
majority of which inhabits the East- 
ern Border. 

The people belong to five or six 
different tribes, the most numerous 
and important of which is the Bam- 
angwato tribe. To these tribes has 
been given the collective name of 
Chuana, or Chwana, and Bechuana- 
land really means the country of the 
Chuana. Apart and distinct from th,e 
tribes there is an indeterminate num- 
ber of so-called Bushmen who inhab- 
it the desert land which stretches 
from the East of the Territory all the 
way to Southwest Africa. These 
Bushmen have had few contacts with 
Europeans, and comparatively little 
is known about them. 

The climate of the country is fairly 
good, varying from the dry heat of 
the desert to more equable conditions 
in the Northeast. Health conditions 
are good, and as the Territory is well 
outside the tropics, it enjoys immuni- 
ty from tropical disease. 

Bechuanaland is essentially a pas- 
toral country, the rain-fall being too 
uncertain to enable grain to be grown 



with a view to export. As a rule the 
crops are meager, though occasion- 
ally seasons of generous rain occur 
when the harvest is plentiful. 

Protestant Missionaries have been 
at work in Bechuanaland for over a 
century, and today there is a strong 
Protestant influence. Most of the 
Chiefs are Protestant — nominally at 
any rate. They are reluctant to give 
permission to Catholic Missionaries 
to settle in the Tribal Reserves. In 
spite of this handicap, however, the 
Oblate Fathers (O.M.I.) of the Ger- 
man Province have done magnificent 
work in South Bechuanaland, and 
their Secondary School at Khale is 
regarded as the principal Education- 
al Establishment in the Territory. 
There are two other smaller mission 
stations in South Bechuanaland. But 
in the main, the Territory is poorly 
developed from a Catholic Missionary 
point of view and offers scope for 
all the zeal and hard work that can 
be brought to bear on it. The Irish 
Passionists are under no illusions in 
regard to the magnitude of the task 
they are undertaking. 



ARGENTINA 

The Immaculate Conception Pro- 
vince held its Chapter during the lat- 
ter part of November. Most Rev. Fr. 
Albert Deane, C.P., General, presided 
over the Chapter. Very Rev. Fr. Am- 
brose, Provincial, was reelected. Very 
Rev. Fathers Ignatius and Peter were 
chosen Consultors, Very Rev. Fr. 
Peter being re-elected. The Rectors 
of the different Retreats are: Very 
Rev. Fr. Stephen, Holy Cross Retreat, 
Buenos Aires; Very Rev. Fr. Norbert, 
St. Paul's, Capitan Sarmiento; Very 



70 



Rev. Fr. Gabriel, Jesus Maria, Cor- 
doba; Very Rev. Fr. Vincent is Mas- 
ter of Novices. 



Shortly before Christmas, Most 
Rev. Fr. Albert gave the holy habit to 
six young men. With the coming of 
the New Year, three more received 
the habit, besides one aspirant for 
the Passionist Brotherhood. 



On December 27, Most Rev. Fr. 
General, and Very Rev. Fr. Provin- 
cial, officiated at the opening of the 
new Convent of the Passionist Nuns 
near Buenos Aires. It was a happy 
event, a mile-stone attained by the 
good Passionist Nuns. The Fathers 
were sincerely pleased to welcome 
them to Argentina. 



Santa Cruz, published by the Pro- 
vince of the Immaculate Conception, 
carried, in article form, a resume of 
the life history of our Fr. Fidelis 
Kent Stone. 



POLAND 

In a meeting of the General Curia, 
held July 7th, 1951, the Vice-Province 
of Poland was given the name of 
"Vice-Province of the Assumption of 
the Blessed Virgin Mary." The same 
Curia meeting chose the Superiors of 
the Vice-Province. Very Rev. Fr. 
Julius of the Heart of Mary was 
elected Vice-Provincial. His Consul- 
tors are Very Rev. Fr. Stanislaus of 
the Queen of Martyrs and Very Rev. 
Fr. Stephen of St. Joseph. 



The November, 1951, issue of 



This year marks the 30th anniver- 
sary of the first overtures that led to 




The Community at Holy Cross Monastery, Buenos Aires, Argentina. Sitting, 
left to right: Frs. Alphonsus, Vincent, Peter, Ambrose (Provincial), Albert 
(General), Ignatius, Stephen, Dominic and Joseph. Standing: Bros. Peter 
and Severiano, Frs. Lawrence, Gabriel, Fidelis, Anselm, Mark, Kieran, Con- 
stantine, Ildephonsus and Bro. Michael. Picture taken during the Provincial 
Chapter, December, 1951. 

71 



the foundation of the Vice-Province 
in Poland. The Passionists went to 
Poland at the express wish of His 
Holiness, Pope Pius XI, who before 
becoming Pope was Apostolic Nun- 
cio to Poland. His Holiness men- 
tioned to the Higher Superiors in 
Rome that he would like to see the 
Passionist Fathers established in Pol- 
and, for the country, which for over 
a century had been divided among 
Russia, Germany and Austria, had 
just earned its independence. To the 
Superiors, the Pope's wish was as a 
command, and they sought immedi- 
ately to bring it about. Two Polish 
Passionists, Very Rev. Fr. Julius 
(present Vice-Provincial) and Broth- 
er Casimir, went to Poland to look 
for a place for the new foundation. 

Once in their newly chosen home, 
the local prelate, Archbishop Nowo- 
wiekski, who was later to die in the 
same Nazi concentration camp as 
seven Polish Passionists, insisted that 
the pioneer Passionists should take 
over the Retreat of Przasnysz, which 
had been founded originally by Paul 
Kotska, brother of St. Stanislaus 
Kotska. At the time the Monastery, 
until 1864 the property of the Ber- 
nardine Fathers, was in complete 
ruin, but, thanks to the kindness of 
the authorities and the generosity of 
benefactors, it was completely re- 
constructed. 

The Passionists took possession of 
their new foundation on June 27, 1923. 
Three members of the Congregation 
were present for the occasion, Very 
Rev. Fr. Tiburzio, General Consultor 
from Spain, Very Rev. Fr. Julius, the 
present Vice-Provincial, and Brother 
Casimir, now in Rome. The Przas- 



nysz Retreat was occupied by the* 
Nazis during the recent war, and suf- 
fered considerably from war damage.i 
Nevertheless, despite the great dif- 
ficulties, the Retreat is returning) 
slowly to its original beauty. 

During the past year, 1951, there 
still were not too many requests for 1 
Missions. At the conclusion of thei 
war, Missions were held in every 
parish to provide a spiritual renewal i 
for the devastated country. Now,' 
though the requests for Missions are 1 
few, those for public spiritual exer- 
cises have increased. These numbered! 
38 during 1951. 



BETHANY 

The Retreat of St. Martha, at Beth- 




Our Lord as the Guest of St. Martha 



72 






Members of St. Gabriel's Province, Belgium, who partook in the Missionary 
Congress, at Kruishoutem, July, 1951. 



any, in Palestine, was reactivated 
some months ago, after the unfortun- 
ate series of events that almost 
spelled tragedy for the struggling 



foundation. On the patronal feast of 
the Retreat, July 29th, 1951, the Latin 
Patriarch of Jerusalem came to cele- 
brate a Pontifical Mass in the re- 




Members of the Missionary Congress, Kruishoutem, Belgium, at work. 
Rev. Fr. General presided at the Congress. 



Most 



73 



stored Chapel, and while there blessed 
the new painting above the main al- 
tar. It was a happy day for the Re- 
treat and its little Community. 

At the request of His Holiness, the 
Retreat has been used temporarily to 
provide accommodations for Pilgrims 
to the Holy Land. Among other out- 
standing guests of the Retreat have 
been Eamon de Valera, President of 
the Irish Free State, several Bishops, 
and the members of the Pontifical Aid 
to Palestine. 



PORTUGAL 

Very Rev. Fr. Theophilus of the 
Cross, C.P., is the Rector of the new 
Preparatory Seminary that openec 
its doors this past school term for 
the first time. At present the Com- 
munity at Barroselas numbers elevei 
priests, six Subdeacons, three broth-i 
ers and 20 Prep students. The nev 
Seminary, recently completed, aisc 
includes a beautiful church, dedicatee 
to Our Lady of Fatima. 




YOU KNOW NOT THE DAY NOR THE HOUR 

St. Benedict's Parish, Kansas City, Kansas, during a recent mission conducted 
by Rev. Fr. Justin Smith, C.P. and Rev. Fr. Mark Hoskins, C.P., had the un- 
usual experience of seeing five persons die. All were men; all died during 
the men's mission. One man collapsed during the Kyrie of Fr. Mark's Mass< 
Father Mark left the altar to give absolution, before Fr. Justin arrived tc 
anoint him. He died shortly after, his Rosary in his hand. Two other men 
died in an auto accident. Another collapsed on his way to Church for Mass 
and Holy Communion. 



74 



ifr 

The 



ITEMS flf 



%« 



ffulletin 
Hoard 



83-/ 



% 



%%/l 



NCE 



Rev. Father Bertrand Abell, C.P., 
,»f Holy Name Retreat, Houston, Tex- 
ts, has recently published a pamphlet 
Untitled: "Holy Hour for Religious," 
[ubtitled "An Hour Spent With Jesus 
n The Memorial of His Passion." As 
he Preface states, this is a Holy 
flour booklet prepared especially for 
jeligious, thus answering a need long 
felt in religious communities. The 
bamphlet consists of a series of short 
neditations and prayers. The theme 
b the doctrine of the Blessed Sacra- 
ment as the Memorial of Christ's Pas- 
sion. The meditations suggested ap- 
)ly directly to the life of a religious, 
rhe second half of the pamphlet con- 
;ains a number of supplementary 
>rayers, all very appropriate for Re- 
igious. The pamphlet is excellently 
lone. At present, however, only a 
rial run of copies has been printed. 
Dopies may be obtained from Rev. Fr. 
Bertrand, Route 12, Box 820, Hous- 
on, Texas. 



in the Province this communication 
which came to our notice recently. 
We quote: "In an effort to make my 
children 'mission-minded', in the 
capacity of teacher and Sodality 
Moderator, I have found one very 
effective way to be direct contact 
with our Missionary priests. In two 
cases vocations have been fostered. 
My problem today is that I do not 
have at hand names and addresses 
of Missionaries who would appreciate 
correspondence and spiritual alms of 
children. If you know any such, Rev. 
Father, and it would not inconveni- 
ence you too greatly, I would deeply 
appreciate you forwarding them to: 
Sister M. Justina, Epiphany Convent, 
10425 Crocuslawn, Detroit 4, Michi- 
gan." 



The Passionist passes on to any of 
he Missionaries and Retreat Masters 



"I'll Not Be A Traitor" is Father 
Raphael Grashoff's latest pamphlet 
off the Press. It was published No- 
vember 1st by The Grail Publications, 
St. Meinrad, Indiana. A review of the 
booklet by Father Lelen is reprinted 
in another section of this issue of 



75 



The Passionist. Those who have seen 
his new pamphlet agree that Father 
Raphael's booklets are improving 
with each publication. 'Til Not Be 
A Traitor" is probably the most at- 
tractive thus far. It is the life of 
St. Vincent Mary Strambi. The title 
utilizes St. Vincent's words of refusal 
to sign the false oath demanded by 
Napoleon. The pamphlet sells for 25^ 
and may be obtained from Father 
Raphael, C.P., 1055 St. Paul Place, 
Cincinnati 2, Ohio, or from The Grail, 
The Abbey Press, St. Meinrad, In- 
diana. 



The September 1951 issue of Thei 
Passionist carried an article by 
Brother Simon Mary Wood, C.P., of 
the Province of St. Paul of the Cross, 
entitled "Health, Our Holy Founder, 
and the Passionist Diet." The article 
included also a chart, headed "Guide 
for Common Diets," in which the 
headings of the four columns of com- 
mon diets was omitted by the printer. 
It likewise slipped by the Proof- 
reader. The Guide is on page 246 of 
the September 1951 issue. It should 
read: "Ulcer-Colon," "Gall Bladder," 
"Diabetic" and "Reducing," in that 
order. 




76 



WHO IS WHO AND WHERE 



HOLY CROSS PROVINCE, MARCH 1952 



ROME 

Malcolm 1 

CHICAGO 

James Patrick 

Neil 3 

Joseph 4 

Camillus 5 

Kilian 7 

Benedict 

:yril 

David 

\ugustine 

Vincent 

tforbert 

yban 

Richard 9 

Matthias 

rregory Mc 

oseph M. 13 

>ius 

Uan 26 
iCenneth 
Jenet 10 
Jarnabas M. 27 
Vm Gail 14 

regory Jos 13 
Patrick 

aul 

Jodfrey 

bhn Baptist 12, 
Toel 10 
tene 16 

larroll 23 

imon 33 

Undents 
parry 

ohn Francis 
ictor 
Vail 

, Gabriel 

[yron 

enis 

lbert 

Jugene 

[einrad 

ruce 

erchmans 



17' 



Francis Martin 
Carl Anthony 

Brothers 

Felix 
Gilbert 
Leo 
Robert 

CINCINNATI 

Gilbert 5 

Egbert 7 

Aurelius 

Alphonsus 

Edwin 

Raphael 

Bernard 

Arthur 9 

Angelo 20 

Louis 

Nicholas 15 

Cyprian F. 9 

Daniel 

Emmanuel 

Donald 

Howard 

Wilfrid 18 

James 10 

Brothers 

Columban 

William 

James 

LOUISVILLE 

Gordian 6 
Bartholomew 7 
Adalbert 
Charles C. 
Lawrence 
Anselm 9 
Andrew 
Thomas 
Hubert 
Marion 
Kraticis F. 
Arnold 
Robert B. 
Alfred 



Flannon 
Thaddeus 
Roger 17 
John 29 
Forrest 28 
Fergus 10 
Warren 

Students 

Caspar 

John Mary 

Peter Claver 

Luke 

Clement 

Paul Mary 

Augustine Paul 

Joachim 

Bede 

Rian 

Jude 

Brothers 

Luke 
Gabriel 
Casimir 
Denis 

ST. LOUIS 

Kyran 5 
Walter 9 
Celestine 31 
John Philip 
Aloysius 
Herbert 
Kevin 
Claude 
Edgar 32 
Ervan 32 
Anthony 
Germain 32 
Cyprian 32 
William Jos. 
Emil 32 
Roch 17, 32 
Joel 32 
Leon 32 
Campion 32 
Raymund 32 
Alvin 30 



82 



Brothers 

Conrad 
Regis 
David 
John 

ST. PAUL 

Elmer 5 
Faustinus 6 
Cormac 7 
Matthew M 
Hyacinth 
Julian 
Edward 
George 
Urban 
Brendan 9 
Leopold 
Jeremias 
Paschal 
Charles G. 
Ronan 
Jordan 10 
Stephen M. 
Firmian 11 

Brothers 

Louis 
Philip 

Bro. Joachim 
Bro. Francis 
Bro. Leonard 

Novices 

Edwin 

Cletus 

Kevin 

Ambrose 

Andrew Mary 

Stephen 

Vincent 

Bernard 

Leonard 

Gerald 

Louis 

Joseph M 

Philip 

Bro. Paul 



Postulant 

Kenneth 

DES MOINES 

Bernard Mary 5 

Miles 7 

Ignatius C. 

Justin 

Cornelius 

Sylvester 

Malachy 

Paulinus 

Peter 

Matthew V. 17 

Regis 

Finan 

Ignatius B. 24 

Thomas More 25 

Frederick 25 

Keith 

Columban 22 

Randal 

Clyde 

Loran 

Students 

Gerard 

Peter 

Michael Jos. 

Raphael 

Benedict 

Theodore 

Owen 

Francis 

Casimir 

Sebastian 

Brothers 

Romuald 
Thomas 
George 
Charles 

DETROIT 

Julius 5 
Ralph 7 
David F. 
Alexis 



77 



Gerald 
Linus 
Boniface 
Gerard 
Mark 
Conrad 
Timothy- 
Roland 
Fidelis 
Patrick 9 
Colum 
Robert C. 
Mel 
Nilus 
Roderick 
Harold 
Declan 18 

Brothers 

Aloysius 
Bernard 
Justin 



20 



SIERRA 
MADRE 

Herman 5 
Paul Francis 7 
Reginald 
Gabriel 19 
Maurice 21 
Ferdinand 
Martin 
Philip 
Austin 
Eustace 20 
Theophane 
Aidan 
Joyce 17 
Edw. Guido 
Ernest 
I'sadore 18 



Students 

Melvin 

Emmet 

Kent 

Michael 

Ward 

Dominic 

Bernardine 

Brothers 

Richard 

Gerald 

Joseph 

BIRMINGHAM 

Canute 8 

Hilary 

Lambert 

Terence 

Brice 

Bro. Henry 



SACRAMENTO 

Basil 5 
Leo 

Damian 18 
Dunstan 
Henry 
Jerome 20 
Bro. Patrick 
HOUSTON 
Conleth 8 
Stanislaus 
Bertrand 
Clarence 
John Aelred 
Bro. Daniel 

ENSLEY 

Nathanael 9 
Ludger 
Canisius 
Carl 10 

FAIRFIELD 

Edmund 



ST. LOUIS 

Quentin 8 
Christopher 
Valentine 18 
Conell 20 
Bro. Anthony 
Bro. Theodore 

CHINA 

Anthony M. 41] 
William W. 41 
Cyprian L. 41 
Harold Trav. 4 

CHAPLAINS 

Fabian 34 
Leonard 35 
Xavier 36 
Brian 37 
Cyril M. 38 
Kenny 39 
Lucian 40 



REFERENCES 



1. SS. Giovanni e Paolo, Rome (147), Italy 


25. 


2. Provincial 


26. 


3. First Consultor 


27 


4. Second Consultor 


28 


5. Rector 


29. 


6. Master of Novices 


30 


7. Vicar 


31 


8. Superior 


32 


9. Pastor 


33 


10. Assistant Pastor 


34. 


11. Vice Master 


35. 


12. Lector of Church History 




13. Lector of Dogma 


36. 


14. Chaplain at Dunning 




15. Chaplain for Passionist Nuns 


37. 


16. Provincial Secretary 




17. Director of Students 


38. 


18. Retreat Director 




19. Assistant Retreat Director 


39. 


20. Retreat Master 




21. Lector of Sacred Eloquence 


40. 


22. Lector of History 




23. Box 1246, Catholic University, Wash- 


41. 


ington 17, D.C. 




24. Lector of English 


42. 



Lector of Philosophy 

Sign Fieldman 

Lector of Scripture 

Lector of Canon Law 

Lector of Moral Theology 

Vice Director 

Chaplain, St. Vincent's 

Lector 

Vocational Director 

723 5th Avenue, Kalispell, Mont. 

Veterans Administration, P.O. Box 982 

Aspinwall, Pa. 

LCDR CHC USNR, U.S. Naval Sta 

Navy No. 720, FPO— New York 

Box 21, Navy No. 127, c/o P.M., Seattl< 

Washington 

HQ CCB 2 AD, APO 42, c/o P.M., Ne> 

York 

HQ 31st Inf. Regt, APO 7, c/o P.MI 

San Francisco 

USS McCaffrey D.D.E. 860, Fleet P.O 

New York 

c/o Fr. Anthony Maloney, C.P., Kov 

loon Box 3323, Hongkong 

The Sign, Union City, N.J. 



78 



PROVINCE OF SAINT PAUL OF THE CROSS 



UNION CITY 

Provincial Staff 

■Ernest Welch 1 
flCanisius Hazlett 2 
jbabriel Gorman 3 
(Frederick Harrer 8 
iBrendan Boyle 9 
Cyril Feeley 10 
JFerdinand Braun 10 
ijCyprian McGarvey 11 
flCornelius McArdle 4 
IRonald Murray 7 
KJerald O'Neill 
'Herbert McDevitt 
Xavier Gonter 
Michael Rausch 17 
[Hyacinth Sullivan 
lAlfred Duffy 
(Ernest Cunningham 33 
Ronald Norris 22 
(Bernard Gilleran 
Stephen P. Kenny 16 
Kenneth Naudin 
I Raymond J. Foerster 
[Malachy Hegarty 17 
Justinian McLaughin 
Andrew Ansbro 21 
Michael Sullivan 
Agatho Dukin 
jAthanasius Drohan 
Theophane Kapcar 
Richard Kugelman 14 
Bertrand Weaver 
Reginald Arliss 
Claude Ennis 
Leo J. Byrnes 
Nicholas Gill 14 
Bennet Kelly 
Cyril Swcinberg 
Cuthbcrt Sullivan 

Newly Ordained 

Cajetan Bendernagrl 
Cornelius Davin 
Luigi Malorzo 
Giles Ahrens 
Cronan Regan 
Norman Demeck 
Thomas Carrol 
Edmund Hanlon 
David Robe its 
Daniel Free 
Edgar Crowe 



Bonaventure Moccia 
Maurus Schenck 

The Sign 

Ralph Gorman 24 
Damian Reid 25 
Fabian Flynn 25 
Wilfrid Scanlon 25 
Donald Nealis 26 
Emmanuel Trainor 27 
Pius Trevoy 28 
Timothy McDermott 29 
Hugh Carrol 29 
Terence Brodie 29 

St. Joseph's 

Benjamin Wirtz 16 
Julius Reiner 17 
Germain Heilman 17 

Cleric 

Canice McQuillan 

Brothers 

Xavier McNamee 
Thomas Aul 
Brian Forrestal 

PITTSBURG 

Gregory Flynn 4 
Paul F. Nager 5 
Arthur Derrig 7 
Alexander Croker 
Urban Manley 
Fulgentius Ventura 
Adrian Lynch 20 
Norman Kelly 
Jeremiah McNamara 
Theophane Maguire 
Thomas Sullivan 
Kevin Conley 
Raphael Duffy 
Gabriel Jaskal 
Robert O'Hara 
Bede Cameron 
Camillus Barth 
Cajetan Sullivan 18 
Vincent M. Frahlick 
Julian Connor 
Owen Lynch 
Clement Pavlick 
Ernan Johnston 
Angelo Jacavone 
Hilarion Valteris 
George Nolan 13 



Brothers 

Sebastian Bullen 
Damian Carroll 
Edward Blair 
Michael Stowber 
Albert La Machia 

ST. MICHAEL'S 

Adolph SchmittJ£-- 
Wendelin Meis 17 
Harold Poletti 17 
Edward Hennessey 17 

DUNKIRK 

St. Mary's 

Egbert Gossart 4 
Eugene Fitzpatrick 7 
Isidore Smith 
Mark Seybold 
Hyacinth Malkowiak 
Eugene Kiernan 16 
Flavian O'Donnell 
Herman Kollig 
Sylvester Cannon 17 
Victor Donovan 14 
Basil Stockmeyer 17 
Hugh McKeown 14 
Bertin Farrel 14 
Benedict Mawn 
Anselm Lacomara 12 
Gerald A. Orlando 
Richard Leary 14 

Students 

Cyprian Regan 
Regis Eichmiller 
Stephen Haslach 
John F. McLoughlin 
Justin Brady 
Justinian Manning 
Ronald Hilliard 
Leo Gerrity 
Anthony Neary 
Jude Dowling 

Brothers 

Stanislaus Tansey 
Andrew Winkelman 

BALTIMORE 

Colman Healey l 
Wendelin Moore 7 
George Hack 
Hilarion O'Rourke 



Arthur Benson 
Hubert Sweeney 
Vincent Connors 
Conor Monaghan 35 
Columba McCloskey 
Paul M. Carroll 
Arthur May 
John F. Poole 17 
Cyril Maguire 
Adrian Poletti 16 
Silvan Brennan 36 
Fidelis Rice 
Myles Whalen 
Leonard Amhrein 17 
Anthony Feerey 
Dominic Cohee 
Leo F. Vanston 17 
Albert Catanzaro 17 
Kenneth Walsh 
Fidelis Connolly 
Nilus Hubble 
Brendan Breen 

Brothers 

Aloysius Blair 
Anthony Callahan 

DUNKIRK 

Holy Cross 
Seminary 

Carrol Ring 4 
Rupert Langenstein 7 
Columba Courtman 14 
Gerald Keeney 
Athanasius Burke 
Luke Hay 

Columban Ashton 14 
Boniface Buckley 14 
Silvio de Luca 
Paschal Drew 14 
Christopher Collins 32 
Luke Misset 
Aquinas Sweeney 14 
Francis Kuba 
Leopold Secundo 
Simon P. Wood 14 
Hilary Sweeney 14 
Timothy Stockmr\ «r 14 
Cletus Dawson 30 
Malachy McGill 14 
Colman Haggerty 14 
Jeremiah Kennedy 14 
Declan Maher 31 



79. 



Brothers 

Vincent Cunningham 
Ronan Caulson 
Gabriel Chilbert 
Joseph Holzer 

SCRANTON 

Hubert Arliss 4 
Michael Connors 7 
Bernard Hartman 
Henry Brown 
Stephen Sweeney- 
Gilbert Smith 
Andrew Maguire 
Austin Luckenbill 
Winfred Guenther 
Canice Gardner 
William Cavanaugh 
Theodore Stout 
Roland Hoffman 
Brian Murphy 
Alban Carroll 
Ambrose Diamond 
Alfred Weaver 16 
Ronan Carroll 
Arnold Horner 
Edgar Vanston 
Ignatius Formica 
Edmund McMahon 
John M. Aleckna 17 
Norbert Herman 
John S. Gresser 14 
Robert Mulgrew 17 
Paulinus Gepp 
Conan Conaboy 
Justinian Gilligan 14 
Chrysostom Ryan 12 
Berard Tierney 

Students 

Benedict Berlo 
Clement Kasinskas 
Barnabas Gorman 
Vincent M. Boney 
Louis McCue 
Kiernan Earley 
Augustine Sheehan 
Colman Connolly 
Gerard Griffiths 
Donald Mclnnis 
Gabriel Shields 
Alfred J. Ruzak 
Aelred Lacomara 



Patrick Fallon 

BOSTON 

Dennis Walsh 4 
Walter Wynn 7 
Damian O'Rourke 
Dunstan Thomas 
Francis Shea 
Bertrand McDewell 16 
Lucian Ducie 18 
Justin Mulcahy 14 
Jordan Black 
Alphonsus Cooley 
Leo J. Berard 
Finbar O'Meara 
Matthias O' Byrne 
Jerome O' Grady 
Cletus Mulloy 
Dunstan Stout 17 
Xavier Welch 14 
Alexis Scott 
Gerard Rooney 19 
Joseph P. O'Neil 
Callistus Connolly 17 
Matthew Nestor 20 
Regis Mulligan 
Joseph Smith 
Paul J. Dignan 
Marcellus McFarland 17 
Bernardine Grande 
Neil Sharkey 14 
Roger Gannon 
Malcolm McGuinn 12 

Students 

Jerome McKenna 
James A. Wiley 
Gerald Surette 
Herbert Eberly 
Walter O'Keefe 
Henry Free 
Bartholomew Weeks 
Roger Ellicot 
Boniface Cousins 
Columban Hewitt 
Alban Harmon 
Gregory Paul 
Leonard Murphy 
Brendan Glynn 

Brothers 

Benedict Palese 
Jerome Cowan 



Linus Monahan 
Conrad Eiben 
Bede Horgan 
Eugene Kozar 
Frederick Corcoran 
Joseph Kerr 
Hilary McGowan 
Rupert Langenbacher 
Myes McCarthy 
Conell Hopkins 
Dominic Grande 
Clement Buckley 
Lawrence Steinhoff 
Gilbert Walser 18 
Winfrid McDermott 
Bartholomew Dean 
Venard Johnson 
Casimir Horvat 
Louis Maillet 
Bonaventure Gonnella 
Alban Lynch 20 



Paulinus Hughes 
Conran Kane 
Austin Busby 
Joseph L Flynn I 
Jordan Loiselle 
Vincent Durkin 
Alan McSweeney 
Gerald Matejune 
Daniel Hunt 
Raymond Houlahe 
James A. McAgho: 
Alphonsus Grande 
Ronald A. Beaton | 
Martin J. Tooker 
Columba Moore 12 
Nilus McAllister I 

Students 
(Sac. Eloq.) 

Gerald Hynes 
Dunstan Guzinski 



Augustine Hennessey 14 Peter Hallisy 



Brothers 

Robert McCormick 

Bernardine Carmassi Connell McKeown 7 



SPRINGFIELD 

Leonard Gownley 4 



Aidan Mahoney 14 
David Bulman 
Ambrose McGuire 12 
Jude Mead 
Lucien Morel 
Fintan Lombard 14 

Students 

James Verity 
Stanislaus Wasek 
Michael J. Brennan 
Aquinas McGurk 
Joyce Spencer 
Julian Morgan 
Lawrence Bellew 
Paul J. Fullam 
Quentin Amrhein 
Neil O'Donnell 
Harold Reusch 
Robert Ehrne 

Brothers 

Martin Smolinsky 
Timothy Foley 
Valentine Cashman 

HARTFORD 

Thaddeus Purdon 4 
Leander Delli Veneri 7 
Maurice Kanzleiter 15 
Leopold Snyder 
Bertin Donahue 20 
Sylvester Grace 
Kenan Carey 



Linus Rottloff 
Godfrey Kaspar 
Flavian Doughertjjl 
Cassian Yuhas 
Kieran Baker 
John B. Pesce 
Victor A. Mazzeo 
Paschal Smith 
Gregory Durkin 
Sebastian Kolinovsfl 
Canisius Lareau 
Christopher Czach<H 
Jogues McQuillan 
Ronan Callahan 
Cormac Kinkead 



Brother 

Simon West 37 
Junior Brothers' 

Daniel Borman 
Christopher Farrel | 
Cyprian Gionet 
Francis Dalton 
Henry Cavanaugh 
Xavier Vitacolonns 
Bernard Pughe 

JAMAICA 

Berchmans Lanags 
Basil Cavanaugh 7 
Theodore Noonan 
Timothy Fitzpatrk 
Patrick Darrah 
Edward Goggin 



80 



Richard Fay 

Bartholomew Mulligan 

Dosmas Shaughncssy 18 

Claude Leahy 

loger Monson 

Vdelbert Poletti 

Juentin Olwell 

)wen Doyle 16 

gnatius Ryan 

?onon O'Brien 

Jordian O'Reilly 

jambert Missack 

Moysius McDonough 

Jharles F. Lang 

3ernardine Gorman 

3enedict McNamara 
Alexander Hoffman 
Fohn G. McMenamin 

Jrban Curran 
Cosmas Boyle 
Peorge Sheehy 
jJKieran Richardson 17 
Philip Ryan 20 
Cronan Flynn 17 
bordian Murphy 
llohn J. Reardon 14 
(Linus McSheffrey 19 
Theodore Foley 14 
Brian Burke 17 
Boniface Hendricks 34 
Fergus McDonald 14 
Florian Pekar 
bolumkille Regan 12 
bamillus Gentakes 

Students 

William Davin 
Andrew Sedorovitz 
Roderick Bettendorf 
Raymond Pulvino 
Francis Hanlon 
Martin Grey 
Kilian M. McNamara 
lohn M. Kelly 
Edward M. Leger 
Kevin Casey 
Patrick McDonough 
Morbert Dorsey 
Nicholas Zitz 
Sugene Leso 
Matthew O'Brien 
Richard Grady 

1. Provincial 

2. 1st Consultor 

3. 2nd Consultor 



Brian Hogan 
Alexis Hewitt 
John F. McMillan 
Albert Pellicane 
Damian Towey 
Anselm Cimmonetti 
Timothy Fitzgerald 
Luke Mulligan 
Aloysius Fahy 

Brothers 

Valentine Rausch 
Edmund Kelly 
John Murphy 

TORONTO 

Felix Hackett 6-16 
Aloysius O'Malley 7 
Celestine McGonigal 
Cuthbert McGreevy 
Donald Keenan 
Crispin Lynch 17 

RIVERDALE 

Benedict Huck 6 
William Harding 
Albinus Kane 
Bonaventure Griffiths 23 
Constantine Phillips 

Brother 

Francis Boylan 

CATHOLIC 
UNIVERSITY 

Brice Ingelesby 
Emmanuel Gardon 

ROME 

Cormac Shanahan 
Kevin McCloskey 
Silvan Rouse 
Caspar Caulfield 
Venard Byrne 

MEXICO CITY 

Anthony J. Nealon 
William Whelan 

ARGENTINE 

Justinian Tobin 

INDIA 

Neil McBrearty 42 

SICK LEAVE 

Martin Ford 
Terence Connelly 

REFERENCES 

4. Rector 

5. Master of Novices 

6. Superior 



Leander Steinmeyer 
Cyprian Walsh 
Quentin Cerullo 
Lawrence Culverhouse 

CAROLINA 

Washington 

John J. Endler 16 
Daniel McDevitt 17 
Gerald Ryan 17 

New Bern 

Julian Endler 16 
Michael Campbell 17 
Peter Quinn 17 
Howard Chirdon 17 

Greenville 

Maurice Tew 16 
Berchmans McHugh 17 

CHINA 

Bishop Cuthbert O'Gara 
Paul J. Ubinger 
Linus Lombard 
Basil Bauer 
Jerome Does 
Lawrence Mullin 
John B. Maye 
Justin Garvey 
Marcellus White 
Ernest Hotz 

ON FURLOUGH 

Raphael Vance 
Antoine de Groeve 

CHAPLAINS 

Sidney Turner 38 (Germany) 
James F. Follard 39 (Korea) 
Christopher Berlo 38 (Colo.) 
Timothy McGrath 39 (Florida) 
Godfrey Reilly 40 (N. Carolina) 
Albinus Lesch 38 (Philippines) 
Romuald Walsh 39 )S. Carolina) 
Conor Smith 38 (Texas) 
Gabriel Bendernagel 41 (Montana) 
Maurice Sullivan 38 (Korea) 
Thomas Berry 38 (Penna) 
Julius Durkan 38 (Penna) 
Eustace McDonald 41 (Texas) 
Conran Five 38 (Texas) 
Nilus McAndrew 38 (Georgia) 
Edward J. Banks 38 



7. Virar 

8. Provincial Secretary 

9. Provincial Eeonoine 



81 



10. Mission Secretary 21. Vocational Director 32. Dean of Studies Prep. 

11. Provincial Dean of Studies 22. Public Relations Director 33. Chaplain : Laurel Hill 

12. Director of Students 23. Chronicler 34. Chaplain: Creedmor 

13. Vce Master 24. Sign: Editor 35. Chaplain: St. Agnes Hos 

14. Lector 25. Sign: Assist. Ed. 36. Chaplain: Bon Secours 

15. Lector Sac. Eloq. 26. Eign: Business Manager 37. Supervisor Junior Bros. 

16. Pastor 27. Sign: Mission Proc. 38. Chaplain: Army 

17. Curate 28. Sign: Field Director 39. Chaplain: Navy 

18. Retreat Director 29. Sign: Fieldman 40. Chaplain: Marine 

19. Assist. Retreat Dir. 30. Director Prep. Sem. 41. Chaplain: Air Force 

20. Retreat Master 31. Assist. Dir. Prep. Sem. 42. Secretary Papal Nuncio 




82 



WORKS OF MINISTRY 

(The folloiviny enumeration does not pretend to be complete. It contains only those works, 
from Setember to March inclusive which have come to our notice.) 



9-16 



27-9 



16-23 



23-30 



30-7 



30-14 
30-21 



9-16 
9-23 
23-30 
30-14 
14-21 
21-28 



Panama, la. 
Payneville, Ky. 
Owatonna, Minn. 
Atlantic, la. 
Chariton, la. 
Gonzales, Calif. 
Holton, Kansas 
Louisville, Ky. 
St. Louis 
Neola, la. 
Westley, la. 
Greenfield, la. 
Mission & XL 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Selma, Alabama 
Houston, Tex. 
Portsmouth, la. 
Chicago, 111. 
Cincinnati, O. 
Osceola, la. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Chesaning, Mich. 
Mexia, Texas 
Mapleton, la. 
Blenker, Wis. 
Piqua, Kansas 
Louisville, Ky. 
Neodesha, Kans. 
Albia, la. 
Newcastle, Nebr. 
Porterville, Calif. 
Worland, Wyo. 
Sleepy Eye, Minn. 
Bismarck, N.D. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Peoria, 111. 
Waukegan, 111. 
Dayton, Ohio 
Flinthill, Mo., 
Cincinnati, O. 
Jennings, Mo. 



MISSIONS 

St. Mary 

St. Mary Magdln. 

St. Joseph 

Sts. Peter & Paul 

Sacred Heart 

St. Theodore 

St. Dominic 

St. Paul 

Nativity 

St. Patrick 

St. Joseph 

St. John 

St. Peter Claver 

Assumption 

O. L. of Fatima 

St. Francis B. 

St. Paul 

St. Bernard 

St. John Evang. 

O. L. of Perpet, Help 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

St. Kilian 

St. Martin 

St. Patrick 

St. Ignatius 

St. Patrick 

St. Peter 

St. Ann 

Mary Help of Xtians 

Cathedral 

St. John 

St. Cecilia 

St. Joseph & Mission 

Holy Family 

St. Theodore 

St. Marg. of Cortona 

Corpus Christi 



Emmanuel & Fidelis 

Roland 

Terence 

Daniel 

Cornelius 

Edward 

George 

Bartholomew 

Edwin and Ralph 

Robert B. & Keith 

Alban 

Keith 
Terence 
Canute 
Emmanuel 
Fidelis & Keith 
Timothy & Hilary 
Lambert 
Ronan 

Marion & Daniel 
Arnold & Kilian 
Bertrand 
Alban 
Finan 
Robert B. 
Bartholomew 
Stanislaus 
Cornelius 
Regis 
Edward 
Aidan 

Arnold & Fidelis 
Emmanuel & Nilus 
Roland 
Ronan 
Kilian 
Flannon 

Lambert & Fidelis 
Edwin & Matthias 
Boniface, Arnold, 
Bartholomew 



MONTANA MISSIONS September-October 

Eureka, Mont. O. L. of Mercy Justin 

Libby, Mont. St. Joseph Leo Patrick 

Whiteflsh, Mont. St. Charles Justin 

Kalispell, Mont. St. Matthew Justin Leo Patrick 

Ronan, Mont. Sacred Heart Leo Patrick 

Poison, Mont. Imm. Concept. Justin 



7-14 Seaside, Calif. 

Oakland, Calif. 

Bakersfield, Calif. 

Granville, la. 
7-21 Chicago, 111. 

Kewanee, 111. 
7-14 Loretto, Kans. 
7-28 Dearborn, Mich. 



7-14 



7-21 
7-14 



15-20 
14-28 
14-21 



14-28 
14-21 
21-28 
14-21 



21-28 



21-4 
28-4 
28-11 
28-4 



28-11 
28-4 



28-11 
28-4 



Emerson, Nebr. 
Hirlinger, Mo. 
Tampa, Kansas 
Louisville, Ky. 
Whorton, Tex. 
Andyville, Ky. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Orlando, Cal. 
Springfield, 111. 
Madison, S. Dak. 
Buechel, Ky. 
Beaumont, Tex. 
St. John, Ind. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Burnside, Mich. 
Brown City, Mich. 
Chillicothe, O. 
Lacona, la. 
Carsonville, Mich. 
Buffalo, Wyo. 
Siegel, 111. 
Emmetsburg, la. 
Danville, Ky. 
Richmond, Tex. 
Smithfield, Tex. 
Mission & XL 
New Buffalo, Mich. 
Waverly, Ky. 
Cutler, Calif. 
Grey bull-, Wyo. 
Kingsbury, Calif. 
Howardstown, Ky. 
Pasadena, Tex. 
Dearborn, Mich. 
Greene, la. 
Sioux City, la. 
Maysville, Ky. 
St. Paul, Minn. 
Spring Valley, Wis. 
Toledo, O. 
Woodsfield, O. 
Detroit, Mich. 
Greenbush, Kans 
Albia, la. 
Keokuk, la. 
Arcadia, Calif. 



St. Joseph 
St. Jerome 
Visitation 
St. Mary 
St. Alphonsus 

Sacred Heart 

Seven Dolors 

Holy Redeemer 

St. Stephen 

Holy Fam. & Mission 

St. Teresa 

St. John 

SS. Peter & Paul 

St. Thomas 

St. Bartholomew 

St. Anne 

St. John 

St. Gemma 

St. Mary 

Sacred Heart 

St. Peter 

St. Mary 

St. Mary 

St. Michael 
Assumption 
SS. Peter & Paul 
Sacred Heart 
St. Paul 

St. Mary of Lake 
St. Peter 



St. Ann 

St. Pius 

Sacred Heart 

St. Mary 

St. Michael 

St. Patrick 

St. Mary 

S. Heart & Miss. 

St. Michael 

St. John 

Presentation 

St. Aloysius 

St. Mary 

St. Francis De S. 



Philip 

Edward 

Martin 

Alban 

Timothy & Canute 

Hilary & Cormac 

Robert B. 

Clarence, Daniel, 

& Miles 
Cornelius 
Gilbert 
George 

Walter & Finan 
Bertrand & J. Aelred 
Marion 
Terence 
Edward 

Stanislaus & Flannon 
Lambert 
Roland 
Emmanuel 
Mark 
Kilian 
Julius 
Julius 

Ronan & Regis 
Fidelis 
Keith 
Aidan 
George 
Alban 
Robert B. 
Bertrand 
John Aelred 

Marion 

Edwin 

Edward 

Aidan 

Philip 

Pascal 

Emmanuel 

Valentine & Fidelis 

Lambert 

Matthias 

Arnold & Loran 

Terence 

Godfrey 

Nilus 

Gilbert 

Timothy 

Cormac 

Boniface 

Regis 

Ernest 



84 



4-11 


Spencer, la. 


Sacred Heart 


Alban 




St. Charleston, O. 


St. 


Charles B. 


Ronan 




Nogales, Ariz. 






Edward 




Baldwin Park, Cal. 






Theophane 




Opelousas, La. 


St. 


Jos